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Course 10: Chemical Engineering
IAP/Spring 2024


10.00 Molecule Builders
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: Chemistry (GIR) and Physics I (GIR)
Units: 1-3-2
Lecture: T1 (E18-676) or T4 (E18-676) Lab: W2-5 (E18-676) or R2-5 (E18-676)
______
Project-based introduction to the applications of engineering design at the molecular level. Working in teams, students complete an open-ended design project that focuses on a topic such as reactor or biomolecular engineering, chemical process design, materials and polymers, or energy. Provides students practical exposure to the field of chemical engineering as well as potential opportunities to continue their project designs in national/international competitions. Limited to 36; preference to first year students.
T. A. Kinney, J. K. Nash
No textbook information available

10.000 Engineering Molecular Marvels: Careers and ChemE at MIT
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-0 [P/D/F]
______
Exposes students to the ways in which chemical technologies have profoundly altered the course of history. Discusses the next century's great challenges, such as curing cancer and supplying the planet's surging demand for clean water, food and energy, sustainably. Provides an overview of how ChemE students apply fundamental engineering principles and leverage technology, from molecules to systems, in the pursuit of practical solutions for these problems and more. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first year students.
Staff

10.01 Ethics for Engineers
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring)
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 1.082, 2.900, 6.9320, 10.01, 16.676, 22.014)
(Subject meets with 6.9321, 20.005)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4
URL: https://e4e.mit.edu/
Lecture: M3-5 (66-148) or T3-5 (66-148) or W3-5 (66-148) or W EVE (7-9 PM) (66-148)
______
Explores how to be an ethical engineer. Students examine engineering case studies along with foundational ethical readings, and investigate which ethical approaches are best and how to apply them as engineers. Topics include justice, rights, cost-benefit analysis, safety, bias, genetic engineering, climate change, and the promise and peril of AI. Discussion-based. All sections cover the same core ethical frameworks, but some sections have a particular focus for engineering case studies, such as Computer Science or Bioengineering. Students are eligible to take any section of the course, regardless of their registered course number. The subject is taught in separate sections. For 20.005, students additionally undertake an ethical-technical analysis of a BE-related topic of their choosing.
Fall: B. L. Trout, P. Hansen, D. Lauffenburger, K. Hansen
Spring: P. Hansen, M. Hemann, D. Lauffenburger, K. Hansen
No required or recommended textbooks

10.02 Foundations of Entrepreneurship for Engineers
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Studies economic and leadership foundations of entrepreneurship as they relate to engineering. Case studies illustrate major impacts of engineering on the world and examine the leaders responsible for such impacts. Authors include Franklin, Keynes, Leonardo, Lincoln, Locke, Machiavelli, Marx, Schmidt, Schumpeter, Smith, Thiel, and Tocqueville. Discusses topics such as the difference between an entrepreneur and a manager, the entrepreneur as founder, and characteristics of principled entrepreneurship.
Staff

10.03[J] Advances in Biomanufacturing
______

Undergrad (Spring); second half of term
(Same subject as 7.458[J])
(Subject meets with 7.548[J], 10.53[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 1-0-2 [P/D/F]
Begins Apr 1. Lecture: TR11-12.30 (66-148)
______
Seminar examines how biopharmaceuticals, an increasingly important class of pharmaceuticals, are manufactured. Topics range from fundamental bioprocesses to new technologies to the economics of biomanufacturing. Also covers the impact of globalization on regulation and quality approaches as well as supply chain integrity. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
A. Sinskey, S. Springs
No textbook information available

10.04 A Philosophical History of Energy
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Philosophic and historical approach to conceptions of energy through the 19th century. Relation of long standing scientific and philosophic problems in the field of energy to 21st-century debates. Topics include the development of thermodynamics and kinetic theories, the foundation of the scientific project, the classical view of energy, and the harnessing of nature. Authors include Bacon, Boltzmann, Carnot, Compte, Descartes, Gibbs, Plato, Aristotle, Leibniz, Kant, Hegel, Mill, Peirce, Whitehead, and Maxwell. Key texts and controversies form topics of weekly writing assignments and term papers.
Staff

10.05 Foundational Analyses of Problems in Energy and the Environment
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Investigates key texts and papers on the foundational thought of current issues in energy and environmental science. Builds an understanding of key debates (scientific, ethical, and political). Aims to inform solutions to key problems related to procurement of energy and environmental degradation. Topics address alternative energy technologies and fossil fuel utilization and emissions, especially carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide sequestration, and geoengineering. Foundational readings from Homer and Greek playwrights, Aristotle, Genesis, Bacon, Locke, Rousseau, Coleridge, Carnot, Clausius, Marx, Heidegger, Carson, Gore, Singer, and Brundtland. Assignments include weekly analyses of readings, videos and related engineering calculations in addition to a final project. Limited to 18.
Staff

10.06 Advanced Topics in Ethics for Engineers
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 10.01, 10.05, or permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
______
In-depth study of varying advanced topics in ethics for engineers. Focuses on foundational works and their significance for the choices that engineers make, both as students and as practicing engineers. Each semester, different works and topics, based on current and perennial issues in ethics and engineering, will be chosen in order to explore facets of the extremely complex and varied subject of the place of engineering for the individual and society. Examples of topics include genetic engineering and what it means to be human, artificial intelligence and thought, the scope and limits of engineering, and engineering and freedom. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor. Limited to 20.
Staff

10.07[J] Debating About Society and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Humanities
(Same subject as 21W.733[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
Lecture: M3-5 (66-160)
______
Presents basic principles of argumentation and persuasive communication, and introduces students to thought-provoking, persuasive texts about science and engineering. Analysis of texts and practices together with case studies form the basis for students' weekly assignments. Students debate such topics as the future of biotechnology, genetic engineering, AI, climate change, social bias, and the connection between engineering and society. Includes oral presentations. Limited to 18.
B. L. Trout, K. Hansen, E. Schiappa
No textbook information available

10.08 Cultural Studies for Chemical Engineering Graduate Students
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4
______
Seminar explores some of the key cultural developments of human beings and their related engineering aspects together with insights into the evolution of chemical engineering. Begins with discussion of Warren K. Lewis on culture and civilization, in addition to other chemical engineering luminaries, Rutherford Aris and John Prausnitz, and Sam Florman. Following their leads, seminar addresses key developments in Greek culture, followed by Renaissance culture, and culminating with contemporary culture. Discusses the influence of chemical engineering throughout the term, but focuses on broader cultural understanding as advocated by Lewis and Aris. Weekly meetings and study question responses are complemented with direct experience of culture and its connection to engineering. Includes guests with various expertise in culture and chemical engineering.
B. L. Trout

10.09 Models of Molecular Systems: from Newtonian Mechanics to Machine Learning
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-7
______
Explores the significance and applicability of models of molecular systems, starting from modern modeling and going back to ancient possibilities. Newtonian mechanics and optics to thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, simulations, and machine learning are covered together with foundational modern and ancient concepts of modeling. Addresses the questions of what models of molecular systems aim towards, what makes a good model, and how one should think about model robustness from phenomenological to first-principles models and from concrete to abstract. Foundational readings inform current approaches, applications including biology, optics and vision, and atomic science. Work consists of weekly assignments, class participation, and a final project.
B. L. Trout

10.10 Introduction to Chemical Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring)
Prereq: Chemistry (GIR) and Physics I (GIR); Coreq: 18.03
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: MWF2 (66-110) Recitation: T11 (56-154) +final
______
Explores the diverse applications of chemical engineering through example problems designed to build computer skills and familiarity with the elements of engineering design. Solutions require application of fundamental concepts of mass and energy conservation to batch and continuous systems involving chemical and biological processes. Problem-solving exercises distributed among lectures and recitation.
Fall: K. E. Galloway, J. Kaczmarek Nash
Spring: K. E. Galloway, J. Kaczmarek Nash
No textbook information available

10.213 Chemical and Biological Engineering Thermodynamics
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 5.601 and 10.10
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: TR2.30-4 (66-110) Recitation: W10 (66-160) or W11 (66-160) +final
______
Thermodynamics of multicomponent, multiphase chemical and biological systems. Applications of first, second, and third laws of thermodynamics to open and closed systems. Properties of mixtures, including colligative properties, chemical reaction equilibrium, and phase equilibrium; non-ideal solutions; power cycles; refrigeration; separation systems.
W. Tisdale, J. Gu
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

10.22 Molecular Engineering
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 5.60 and 10.213
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces molecular concepts in relation to engineering thermodynamics. Includes topics in statistical mechanics, molecular description of gases and liquids, property estimation, description of equilibrium and dynamic properties of fluids from molecular principles, and kinetics of activated processes. Also covers some basic aspects of molecular simulation and applications in systems of engineering interest.
Staff

10.25 Industrial Chemistry and Chemical Process Pathways
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Chemistry (GIR), 10.213, and 10.37
Units: 3-0-6
______
Chemical and engineering principles involved in creation and operation of viable industrial processes. Topics: analysis of process chemistry by p-pathways (i.e., radical, ionic, and pericyclic reactions of organic syntheses) and d-pathways (i.e., catalysis by transition-metal complexes). Use of reaction mechanisms for inference of co-product formation, kinetics, and equilibria: process synthesis logic related to reaction selectivity, recycle, separations. Illustrations drawn from current and contemplated commercial practice.
Staff

10.26 Chemical Engineering Projects Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 10.27, 10.29)
Prereq: (10.302 and (2.671, 5.310, 7.003, 12.335, 20.109, (1.106 and 1.107), or (5.351, 5.352, and 5.353))) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-8-4
Lecture: TR1-5 (4-370) Lab: TR1-5 (TBD) or TR1-5 (TBD) or TR1-5 (TBD) or TR1-5 (TBD) or TR1-5 (TBD) or TR1-5 (TBD)
______
Projects in applied chemical engineering research. Students work in teams on one project for the term. Projects often suggested by local industry. Includes training in project planning and project management, execution of experimental work, data analysis, oral presentation, individual and collaborative report writing.
G. C. Rutledge, T. A. Kinney, A. Mariotta
No textbook information available

10.27 Energy Engineering Projects Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 10.26, 10.29)
Prereq: (10.302 and (2.671, 5.310, 7.003, 12.335, 20.109, (1.106 and 1.107), or (5.351, 5.352, and 5.353))) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-8-4
Lecture: TR1-5 (4-370) Lab: TR1-5 (TBD) or TR1-5 (TBD) or TR1-5 (TBD) or TR1-5 (TBD) or TR1-5 (TBD) or TR1-5 (TBD)
______
Projects in applied energy engineering research. Students work in teams on one project for the term. Projects often suggested by local industry. Includes training in project planning and project management, execution of experimental work, data analysis, oral presentation, individual and collaborative report writing. Preference to Energy Studies minors.
G. Stephanopoulos
No textbook information available

10.28 Chemical-Biological Engineering Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: ((5.07 or 7.05) and (5.310 or 7.003)) or permission of instructor
Units: 2-8-5
Credit cannot also be received for 10.28B
______
Introduces the complete design of the bioprocess: from vector selection to production, separation, and characterization of recombinant products. Utilize concepts from many fields, such as, chemical and electrical engineering, and biology. Student teams work through parallel modules spanning microbial fermentation and animal cell culture. With the bioreactor at the core of the experiments, students study cell metabolism and biological pathways, kinetics of cell growth and product formation, oxygen mass transport, scale-up and techniques for the design of process control loops. Introduces novel bioreactors and powerful analytical instrumentation. Downstream processing and recombinant product purification also included. Credit cannot also be received for 10.28A. Enrollment limited.
J. Hamel

10.28A Chemical-Biological Engineering Laboratory I: Introduction to Lab Experiments
______

Undergrad (IAP, Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: ((5.07 or 7.05) and (5.310 or 7.003)) or permission of instructor
Units: 1-3-0
______
First in a two-subject sequence that spans IAP and spring term, and covers the same content as 10.28; see 10.28 for description. Course utilizes online learning technologies and simulations in addition to traditional lab experiments. 10.28A comprises the major lab portion of the subject.  Credit cannot also be received for 10.28. Enrollment limited.
Staff

10.28B Chemical-Biological Engineering Laboratory II: Long-term, Online and Simulated Experiments
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 10.28A
Units: 1-2-8
Credit cannot also be received for 10.28
______
Second in a two-subject sequence that spans IAP and spring term, and covers the same content as 10.28; see 10.28 for description. Course utilizes online learning technologies and simulations in addition to traditional lab experiments. 10.28B comprises the simulation portion of the subject, and most of the communication component. Enrollment limited.
Staff

10.29 Biological Engineering Projects Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 10.26, 10.27)
Prereq: (10.302 and (2.671, 5.310, 7.003, 12.335, 20.109, (1.106 and 1.107), or (5.351, 5.352, and 5.353))) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-8-4
Lecture: TR1-5 (4-370) Lab: TR1-5 (TBD) or TR1-5 (TBD) or TR1-5 (TBD) or TR1-5 (TBD) or TR1-5 (TBD) or TR1-5 (TBD)
______
Projects in applied biological engineering research. Students work in teams on one project for the term. Projects often suggested by local industry. Includes training in project planning and project management, execution of experimental work, data analysis, oral presentation, individual and collaborative report writing.
J-F Hamel, B. Dekosky
No textbook information available

10.291[J] Introduction to Sustainable Energy
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.650[J], 22.081[J])
(Subject meets with 1.818[J], 2.65[J], 10.391[J], 11.371[J], 22.811[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-1-8
______
Assessment of current and potential future energy systems. Covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting 21st-century regional and global energy needs in a sustainable manner. Examines various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Investigates their attributes within a quantitative analytical framework for evaluation of energy technology system proposals. Emphasizes analysis of energy propositions within an engineering, economic and social context. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to juniors and seniors.
M. Golay

10.301 Fluid Mechanics
______

Undergrad (Spring) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
Prereq: 10.10 and 18.03
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: TR12-1.30 (66-110) Recitation: M11 (66-144) or M12 (66-144) +final
______
Introduces the mechanical principles governing fluid flow. Stress in a fluid. Conservation of mass and momentum, using differential and integral balances. Elementary constitutive equations. Hydrostatics. Exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. Approximate solutions using control volume analysis. Mechanical energy balances and Bernoulli's equation. Dimensional analysis and dynamic similarity. Introduces boundary-layer theory and turbulence.
P. Doyle, J. Drake
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

10.302 Transport Processes
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: (5.601, 10.213, and 10.301) or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
______
Principles of heat and mass transfer. Steady and transient conduction and diffusion. Radiative heat transfer. Convective transport of heat and mass in both laminar and turbulent flows. Emphasis on the development of a physical understanding of the underlying phenomena and upon the ability to solve real heat and mass transfer problems of engineering significance.
J. Drake, B. DeKosky

10.31 Nanoscale Energy Transport Processes
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 10.51)
Prereq: ((2.51 or 10.302) and (3.033 or 5.61)) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Explores the impact of nanoscale phenomena on macroscale transport of energy-carrying molecules, phonons, electrons, and excitons. Studies the effect of structural and energetic disorder, wave-like vs. particle-like transport, quantum and classical size effects, and quantum coherence. Emphasizes quantitative analysis, including the Boltzmann transport equation, Einstein relation, Wiedemann-Franz law, and Marcus electron transfer theory. Also addresses percolation theory and the connection to energy conversion technologies, such as solar cells, thermoelectrics, and LEDs. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

10.32 Separation Processes
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 10.213 and 10.302
Units: 3-0-6
Lecture: TR9.30-11 (66-110) +final
______
General principles of separation by equilibrium and rate processes. Staged cascades. Applications to distillation, absorption, adsorption, and membrane processes. Use of material balances, phase equilibria, and diffusion to understand and design separation processes.
Q. M. Qi, Z. Smith
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

10.321 Design Principles in Mammalian Systems and Synthetic Biology
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 10.521)
Prereq: 7.05 and 18.03
Units: 3-0-6
______
Focuses on the layers of design, from molecular to large networks, in mammalian biology. Formally introduces concepts in the emerging fields of mammalian systems and synthetic biology, including engineering principles in neurobiology and stem cell biology. Exposes advanced students from quantitative backgrounds to problem-solving opportunities at the interface of molecular biology and engineering. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
K. E. Galloway

10.333 Introduction to Modeling and Simulation
______

Undergrad (Spring) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 1.021, 3.021, 10.333, 22.00)
Prereq: 18.03, 3.016B, or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: TR3-4.30 (4-231) Recitation: W3 (24-121)
______
Basic concepts of computer modeling and simulation in science and engineering. Uses techniques and software for simulation, data analysis and visualization. Continuum, mesoscale, atomistic and quantum methods used to study fundamental and applied problems in physics, chemistry, materials science, mechanics, engineering, and biology. Examples drawn from the disciplines above are used to understand or characterize complex structures and materials, and complement experimental observations.
M. Buehler, A. Hoffman
No textbook information available

10.34 Numerical Methods Applied to Chemical Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Numerical methods for solving problems arising in heat and mass transfer, fluid mechanics, chemical reaction engineering, and molecular simulation. Topics: numerical linear algebra, solution of nonlinear algebraic equations and ordinary differential equations, solution of partial differential equations (e.g., Navier-Stokes), numerical methods in molecular simulation (dynamics, geometry optimization). All methods are presented within the context of chemical engineering problems. Familiarity with structured programming is assumed.
C. Coley, W. Green

10.345 Fundamentals of Metabolic and Biochemical Engineering: Applications to Biomanufacturing
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 10.545)
Prereq: 5.07, 7.05, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines the fundamentals of cell and metabolic engineering for biocatalyst design and optimization, as well as biochemical engineering principles for bioreactor design and operation, and downstream processing. Presents applications of microbial processes for production of commodity and specialty chemicals and biofuels in addition to mammalian cell cultures for production of biopharmaceuticals. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

10.352 Modern Control Design
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 10.552)
Prereq: 18.03 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Covers modern methods for dynamical systems analysis, state estimation, controller design, and related topics. Uses example applications to demonstrate Lyapunov and linear matrix inequality-based methods that explicitly address actuator constraints, nonlinearities, and model uncertainties. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.  Limited to 30.
R. D. Braatz

10.353 Model Predictive Control
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 10.553)
Prereq: 18.03 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Provides an introduction to the multivariable control of dynamical systems with constraints on manipulated, state, and output variables. Covers multiple mathematical formulations that are popular in academia and industry, including dynamic matrix control and state-space model predictive control of uncertain, nonlinear, and large-scale systems. Uses numerous real industrial processes as examples. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

10.354[J] Process Data Analytics
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.874[J])
(Subject meets with 2.884[J], 10.554[J])
Prereq: 18.03 or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
______
Provides an introduction to data analytics for manufacturing processes. Topics include chemometrics, discriminant analysis, hyperspectral imaging, machine learning, big data, Bayesian methods, experimental design, feature spaces, and pattern recognition as relevant to manufacturing process applications (e.g., output estimation, process control, and fault detection, identification and diagnosis). Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

10.37 Chemical Kinetics and Reactor Design
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 10.213 and 10.302
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR11 (66-110) Recitation: W11 (66-144) +final
______
Applies the concepts of reaction rate, stoichiometry and equilibrium to the analysis of chemical and biological reacting systems. Derivation of rate expressions from reaction mechanisms and equilibrium or steady state assumptions. Design of chemical and biochemical reactors via synthesis of chemical kinetics, transport phenomena, and mass and energy balances. Topics: chemical/biochemical pathways; enzymatic, pathway and cell growth kinetics; batch, plug flow and well-stirred reactors for chemical reactions and cultivations of microorganisms and mammalian cells; heterogeneous and enzymatic catalysis; heat and mass transport in reactors, including diffusion to and within catalyst particles and cells or immoblized enzymes.
H. J. Kulik, W. H. Green
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

10.380[J] Viruses, Pandemics, and Immunity
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 5.002[J], HST.438[J])
(Subject meets with 5.003[J], 8.245[J], 10.382[J], HST.439[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-1
______
Covers the history of infectious diseases, basics of virology, immunology, and epidemiology, and ways in which diagnostic tests, vaccines, and antiviral therapies are currently designed and manufactured. Examines the origins of inequities in infection rates in society, and issues pertinent to vaccine safety. Final project explores how to create a more pandemic-resilient world. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first-year students. Preference to first-year students; all others should take HST.439.
A. Chakraborty

10.382[J] Viruses, Pandemics, and Immunity
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 5.003[J], 8.245[J], HST.439[J])
(Subject meets with 5.002[J], 10.380[J], HST.438[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-1
______
Covers the history of infectious diseases, basics of virology, immunology, and epidemiology, and ways in which diagnostic tests, vaccines, and antiviral therapies are currently designed and manufactured. Examines the origins of inequities in infection rates in society, and issues pertinent to vaccine safety. Final project explores how to create a more pandemic-resilient world. HST.438 intended for first-year students; all others should take HST.439.
A. Chakraborty

10.390[J] Fundamentals of Advanced Energy Conversion
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Same subject as 2.60[J])
(Subject meets with 2.62[J], 10.392[J], 22.40[J])
Prereq: 2.006, (2.051 and 2.06), or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: MW12.30-2.30 (3-133)
______
Fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemistry, and transport applied to energy systems. Analysis of energy conversion and storage in thermal, mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical processes in power and transportation systems, with emphasis on efficiency, performance, and environmental impact. Applications to fuel reforming and alternative fuels, hydrogen, fuel cells and batteries, combustion, catalysis, combined and hybrid power cycles using fossil, nuclear and renewable resources. CO2 separation and capture. Biomass energy. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
A. Ghoniem
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

10.391[J] Sustainable Energy
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 1.818[J], 2.65[J], 11.371[J], 22.811[J])
(Subject meets with 2.650[J], 10.291[J], 22.081[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-1-8
______
Assessment of current and potential future energy systems. Covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting 21st-century regional and global energy needs in a sustainable manner. Examines various energy technologies in each fuel cycle stage for fossil (oil, gas, synthetic), nuclear (fission and fusion) and renewable (solar, biomass, wind, hydro, and geothermal) energy types, along with storage, transmission, and conservation issues. Emphasizes analysis of energy propositions within an engineering, economic and social context. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
M. Golay

10.392[J] Fundamentals of Advanced Energy Conversion
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 2.62[J], 22.40[J])
(Subject meets with 2.60[J], 10.390[J])
Prereq: 2.006, (2.051 and 2.06), or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: MW12.30-2.30 (3-133)
______
Fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemistry, and transport applied to energy systems. Analysis of energy conversion and storage in thermal, mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical processes in power and transportation systems, with emphasis on efficiency, performance and environmental impact. Applications to fuel reforming and alternative fuels, hydrogen, fuel cells and batteries, combustion, catalysis, combined and hybrid power cycles using fossil, nuclear and renewable resources. CO2 separation and capture. Biomass energy. Meets with 2.60 when offered concurrently; students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.
A. Ghoniem
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

10.40 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 10.213
Units: 4-0-8
______
Basic postulates of classical thermodynamics. Application to transient open and closed systems. Criteria of stability and equilibria. Constitutive property models of pure materials and mixtures emphasizing molecular-level effects using the formalism of statistical mechanics. Phase and chemical equilibria of multicomponent systems. Applications emphasized through extensive problem work relating to practical cases.
B. Olsen

10.407[J] Money for Startups
______

Graduate (Spring); second half of term
(Same subject as 2.916[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4
Begins Apr 1. Lecture: MW1-2.30 (66-168)
______
Introduction to the substance and process of funding technology startups. Topics include a comparative analysis of various sources of capital; templates to identify the optimal investor; legal frameworks, US and offshore, of the investment process and its related jargon; an introduction to understanding venture capital as a business; and market practice and standards for term sheet negotiation. Emphasizes strategy as well as tactics necessary to negotiate and build effective, long-term relationships with investors, particularly venture capital firms (VCs).
S. Loessberg
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

10.421[J] Energy Systems for Climate Change Mitigation
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 1.067[J], IDS.065[J])
(Subject meets with 1.670[J], 10.621[J], IDS.521[J])
Prereq: (Calculus I (GIR), Chemistry (GIR), and Physics I (GIR)) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Reviews the contributions of energy systems to global greenhouse gas emissions, and the levers for reducing those emissions. Lectures and projects focus on evaluating energy systems against climate policy goals, using performance metrics such as cost, carbon intensity, and others. Student projects explore pathways for realizing emissions reduction scenarios. Projects address the climate change mitigation potential of energy technologies (hardware and software), technological and behavioral change trajectories, and technology and policy portfolios. Background in energy systems strongly recommended. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments and explore the subject in greater depth. Preference to students in the Energy Studies or Environment and Sustainability minors.
J. Trancik

10.424 Pharmaceutical Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 10.524)
Prereq: 10.213
Units: 3-0-6
______
Presents engineering principles and unit operations involved in the manufacture of small molecules pharmaceuticals, from the isolation of purified active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) to the final production of drug product. Regulatory issues include quality by design and process analytical technologies of unit operations, such as crystallization, filtration, drying, milling, blending, granulation, tableting and coating. Also covers principles of formulation for solid dosage forms and parenteral drugs. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 50.
A. S. Myerson

10.426 Electrochemical Energy Systems
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 10.626)
Prereq: 10.302 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR11-12.30 (66-144) +final
______
Introduces electrochemical energy systems from the perspective of thermodynamics, kinetics, and transport. Surveys analysis and design of electrochemical reactions and processes by integrating chemical engineering fundamentals with knowledge from diverse fields, including chemistry, electrical engineering, and materials science. Includes applications to fuel cells, electrolyzers, and batteries. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
M. Bazant
No textbook information available

10.43 Introduction to Interfacial Phenomena
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 10.213 or introductory subject in thermodynamics or physical chemistry
Units: 3-0-6
______
Introduces fundamental and applied aspects of interfacial systems. Theory of capillarity. Experimental determination of surface and interfacial tensions. Thermodynamics of interfaces. The Gibbs adsorption equation. Charged interfaces. Surfactant adsorption at interfaces. Insoluble monolayers. Curvature effects on the equilibrium state of fluids. Nucleation and growth. Fundamentals of wetting and contact angle. Adhesion, cohesion, and spreading. Wetting of textured surfaces. Super-hydrophilic and super-hydrophobic surfaces. Self-cleaning surfaces.
Staff

10.437[J] Computational Chemistry
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 5.697[J])
(Subject meets with 5.698[J], 10.637[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Addresses both the theory and application of first-principles computer simulations methods (i.e., quantum, chemical, or electronic structure), including Hartree-Fock theory, density functional theory, and correlated wavefunction methods. Covers enhanced sampling, ab initio molecular dynamics, and transition-path-finding approaches as well as errors and accuracy in total and free energies. Discusses applications such as the study and prediction of properties of chemical systems, including heterogeneous, molecular, and biological catalysts (enzymes), and physical properties of materials. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 35; no listeners.
H. J. Kulik

10.441[J] Molecular and Engineering Aspects of Biotechnology
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
(Same subject as 7.37[J], 20.361[J])
Prereq: (7.06 and (2.005, 3.012, 5.60, or 20.110)) or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
Credit cannot also be received for 7.371
______
Covers biological and bioengineering principles underlying the development and therapeutic use of recombinant proteins and stem cells; glycoengineering of recombinant proteins; normal and pathological signaling by growth factors and their receptors; receptor trafficking; monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics; protein pharmacology and delivery; stem cell-derived tissues as therapeutics; RNA therapeutics; combinatorial protein engineering; and new antitumor drugs.
Staff

10.442 Biochemical Engineering and Biomanufacturing Principles
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 10.542)
Prereq: (Biology (GIR), 5.07, and 10.37) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
Lecture: MWF2 (66-156)
______
Explores the interactions of chemical engineering, biochemical engineering, and microbiology with particular emphasis on applications to bioprocess development. Examines mathematical representations of microbial systems, especially with regard to the kinetics of growth, death, and metabolism. Discusses the fundamentals of bioreactor design and operation, including continuous fermentation, mass transfer, and agitation. Examples encompass both enzyme and whole cell systems. Presents concepts in process development for microbial and animal cell cultures, with considerations towards production of biological products ranging from chiral specialty chemicals/pharmaceuticals to therapeutic proteins. Concludes with a discussion of aspects of cellular engineering and the role of molecular biology in addressing process development problems.
K. J. Prather, J. Leung
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

10.443 Future Medicine: Drug Delivery, Therapeutics, and Diagnostics
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 10.643[J], HST.526[J])
Prereq: 5.12 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Aims to describe the direction and future of medical technology. Introduces pharmaceutics, pharmacology, and conventional medical devices, then transitions to drug delivery systems, mechanical/electric-based and biological/cell-based therapies, and sensors. Covers nano- and micro drug delivery systems, including polymer-drug conjugates, protein therapeutics, liposomes and polymer nanoparticles, viral and non-viral genetic therapy, and tissue engineering. Previous coursework in cell biology and organic chemistry recommended. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 40.
Staff

10.450 Process Dynamics, Operations, and Control
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 10.302 and 18.03
Units: 3-0-6
______
Introduction to dynamic processes and the engineering tasks of process operations and control. Subject covers modeling the static and dynamic behavior of processes; control strategies; design of feedback, feedforward, and other control structures; model-based control; applications to process equipment.
Staff

10.466 Structure of Soft Matter
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 10.566)
Prereq: 5.60
Units: 3-0-6
______
Provides an introduction to the basic thermodynamic language used for describing the structure of materials, followed by a survey of the scattering, microscopy and spectroscopic techniques for structure and morphology characterization. Applies these concepts to a series of case studies illustrating the diverse structures formed in soft materials and the common length, time and energy scales that unify this field. For students interested in studying polymer science, colloid science, nanotechnology, biomaterials, and liquid crystals. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

10.467 Polymer Science Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: 5.12
Units: 2-7-6
______
Experiments broadly aimed at acquainting students with the range of properties of polymers, methods of synthesis, and physical chemistry. Examples: solution polymerization of acrylamide, bead polymerization of divinylbenzene, interfacial polymerization of nylon 6,10. Evaluation of networks by tensile and swelling experiments. Rheology of polymer solutions and suspensions. Physical properties of natural and silicone rubber. Preference to Course 10 seniors and juniors.
Z. Smith

10.489 Concepts in Modern Heterogeneous Catalysis
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 10.689)
Prereq: 10.302 and 10.37
Units: 3-0-6
______
Explores topics in the design and implementation of heterogeneous catalysts for chemical transformations. Emphasizes use of catalysis for environmentally benign and sustainable chemical processes. Lectures address concepts in catalyst preparation, catalyst characterization, quantum chemical calculations, and microkinetic analysis of catalytic processes. Shows how experimental and theoretical approaches can illustrate important reactive intermediates and transition states involved in chemical reaction pathways, and uses that information to help identify possible new catalysts that may facilitate reactions of interest. Draws examples from current relevant topics in catalysis. Includes a group project in which students investigate a specific topic in greater depth. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

10.490 Integrated Chemical Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: 10.37
Units: 3-0-6
Lecture: MWF10 (66-156)
______
Presents and solves chemical engineering problems in an industrial context. Emphasis on the integration of fundamental concepts with approaches in process design, and on problems that demand synthesis, economic analysis, and process design; consideration of safety analysis, process dynamics and the use of process simulators and related tools to approach such problems. The specific application of these fundamental concepts will vary each term, and may include chemical, electrochemical, pharmaceutical, biopharmaceutical (biologic) or related processes, operated in batch, semi-batch, continuous or hybrid mode. May be repeated once for credit with permission of instructor.
Fall: T. A. Kinney
Spring: C. Cooney. C. Love
No required or recommended textbooks

10.492A Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I
______

Undergrad (Fall) Can be repeated for credit; first half of term
Prereq: 10.301 and permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
______
Chemical engineering problems presented and analyzed in an industrial context. Emphasizes the integration of fundamentals with material property estimation, process control, product development, and computer simulation. Integration of societal issues, such as engineering ethics, environmental and safety considerations, and impact of technology on society are addressed in the context of case studies. 10.37 and 10.302 required for certain topic modules. See departmental website for individual ICE-T module descriptions.
H. D. Sikes

10.492B Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I
______

Undergrad (Fall) Can be repeated for credit; second half of term
Prereq: 10.301 and permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
______
Chemical engineering problems presented and analyzed in an industrial context. Emphasizes the integration of fundamentals with material property estimation, process control, product development, and computer simulation. Integration of societal issues, such as engineering ethics, environmental and safety considerations, and impact of technology on society are addressed in the context of case studies. 10.37 and 10.302 required for certain topic modules. See departmental website for individual ICE-T module descriptions.
K. Jensen

10.493 Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics II
______

Undergrad (IAP); partial term
Prereq: 10.301 and permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
______
Chemical engineering problems presented and analyzed in an industrial context. Emphasizes the integration of fundamentals with material property estimation, process control, product development, and computer simulation. Integration of societal issues, such as engineering ethics, environmental and safety considerations, and impact of technology on society are addressed in the context of case studies. 10.37 and 10.302 required for certain topic modules. See departmental website for individual ICE-T module descriptions.
J. Drake
No textbook information available

10.494A Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics III
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring) Can be repeated for credit; first half of term
Prereq: 10.301 and permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
______
Chemical engineering problems presented and analyzed in an industrial context. Emphasizes the integration of fundamentals with material property estimation, process control, product development, and computer simulation. Integration of societal issues, such as engineering ethics, environmental and safety considerations, and impact of technology on society are addressed in the context of case studies. 10.37 and 10.302 required for certain topic modules. See departmental website for individual ICE-T module descriptions.
Staff

10.494B Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics III
______

Undergrad (Spring) Can be repeated for credit; second half of term
Prereq: 10.301 and permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
Begins Apr 1. Lecture: MWF11 (66-168)
______
Chemical engineering problems presented and analyzed in an industrial context. Emphasizes the integration of fundamentals with material property estimation, process control, product development, and computer simulation. Integration of societal issues, such as engineering ethics, environmental and safety considerations, and impact of technology on society are addressed in the context of case studies. 10.37 and 10.302 required for certain topic modules. See departmental website for individual ICE-T module descriptions.
D. Anderson
No textbook information available

10.495 Molecular Design and Bioprocess Development of Immunotherapies
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 10.595)
Prereq: 7.06 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Examines challenges and opportunities for applying chemical engineering principles to address the growing global burden of infectious disease, including drug-resistant strains and neglected pathogens. Topics include a historical overview of vaccines and immunotherapies, the molecular design considerations for new immunotherapies and adjuvants, the economic challenges for process development and manufacturing of immunotherapies, and new technologies for designing and assessing therapies. Case studies to cover topics for specific diseases. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
J. C. Love

10.496[J] Design of Sustainable Polymer Systems
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 1.096[J])
Prereq: (10.213 and 10.301) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Capstone subject in which students are charged with redesigning consumable plastics to improve their recyclability and illustrate the potential future of plastic sourcing and management. Students engage with industry partners and waste handlers to delineate the design space and understand downstream limitations in waste treatment. Instruction includes principles of plastic design, polymer selection, cost estimation, prototyping, and the principles of sustainable material design. Students plan and propose routes to make enhanced plastic kits. Industry partners and course instructors select winning designs. Those students can elect to proceed to a semester of independent study in which prototype kits are fabricated (using polymer extrusion, cutting, 3D printing), potentially winning seed funds to translate ideas into real impacts. Preference to juniors and seniors in Courses 10, 1, and 2.
Staff

10.50 Analysis of Transport Phenomena
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 10.301 and 10.302
Units: 4-0-8
______
Unified treatment of heat transfer, mass transfer, and fluid mechanics, emphasizing scaling concepts in formulating models and analytical methods for obtaining solutions. Topics include conduction and diffusion, laminar flow regimes, convective heat and mass transfer, and simultaneous heat and mass transfer with chemical reaction or phase change.
M. Z. Bazant, M. Qi

10.51 Nanoscale Energy Transport Processes
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 10.31)
Prereq: ((2.51 or 10.302) and (3.033 or 5.61)) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Explores the impact of nanoscale phenomena on macroscale transport of energy-carrying molecules, phonons, electrons, and excitons. Studies the effect of structural and energetic disorder, wave-like vs. particle-like transport, quantum and classical size effects, and quantum coherence. Emphasizes quantitative analysis, including the Boltzmann transport equation, Einstein relation, Wiedemann-Franz law, and Marcus electron transfer theory. Also addresses percolation theory and the connection to energy conversion technologies, such as solar cells, thermoelectrics, and LEDs. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
W. A. Tisdale

10.52 Mechanics of Fluids
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 10.50
Units: 3-0-6
______
Advanced subject in fluid and continuum mechanics. Content includes kinematics, macroscopic balances for linear and angular momentum, the stress tensor, creeping flows and the lubrication approximation, the boundary layer approximation, linear stability theory, and some simple turbulent flows.
Staff

10.521 Design Principles in Mammalian Systems and Synthetic Biology
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 10.321)
Prereq: (7.05 and 18.03) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Focuses on the layers of design, from molecular to large networks, in mammalian biology. Formally introduces concepts in the emerging fields of mammalian systems and synthetic biology, including engineering principles in neurobiology and stem cell biology. Exposes advanced students from quantitative backgrounds to problem-solving opportunities at the interface of molecular biology and engineering. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
K. E. Galloway

10.524 Pharmaceutical Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 10.424)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
______
Presents engineering principles and unit operations involved in the manufacture of small molecules pharmaceuticals, from the isolation of purified active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) to the final production of drug product. Regulatory issues include quality by design and process analytical technologies of unit operations, such as crystallization, filtration, drying, milling, blending, granulation, tableting and coating. Also covers principles of formulation for solid dosage forms and parenteral drugs. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 50.
A. S. Myerson

10.53[J] Advances in Biomanufacturing
______

Graduate (Spring); second half of term
(Same subject as 7.548[J])
(Subject meets with 7.458[J], 10.03[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 1-0-2
Begins Apr 1. Lecture: TR11-12.30 (66-148)
______
Seminar examines how biopharmaceuticals, an increasingly important class of pharmaceuticals, are manufactured. Topics range from fundamental bioprocesses to new technologies to the economics of biomanufacturing. Also covers the impact of globalization on regulation and quality approaches as well as supply chain integrity. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
A. Sinskey, S. Springs
No textbook information available

10.531[J] Macromolecular Hydrodynamics
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 2.341[J])
Prereq: 2.25, 10.301, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Physical phenomena in polymeric liquids undergoing deformation and flow. Kinematics and material functions for complex fluids; techniques of viscometry, rheometry; and linear viscoelastic measurements for polymeric fluids. Generalized Newtonian fluids. Continuum mechnanics, frame invariance, and convected derivatives for finite strain viscoelasticity. Differential and integral constitutive equations for viscoelastic fluids. Analytical solutions to isothermal and non-isothermal flow problems; the roles of non-Newtonian viscosity, linear viscoelasticity, normal stresses, elastic recoil, stress relaxation in processing flows. Introduction to molecular theories for dynamics of polymeric fluids. (Extensive class project and presentation required instead of a final exam).
G. McKinley

10.534 Bioelectrochemistry
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
______
Provides an overview of electrochemistry as it relates to biology, with an emphasis on electron transport in living systems. Primary literature used as a guide for discussion. Objective is to enable students to learn the fundamental principles of electrochemistry and electrochemical engineering applied to biological systems, explore the role of electron transfer in the natural world using examples from the primary literature, analyze recent work related to bioelectrochemistry, and develop an original research proposal based on course material. Topics include thermodynamics and transport processes in bioelectrical systems, electron transport chains in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, electroanalytical techniques for the evaluation of biological systems, and engineering bioenergetic systems.
A. L. Furst

10.535[J] Protein Engineering
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 20.535[J])
Prereq: 18.03 and (5.07 or 7.05)
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR9.30-11 (66-154)
______
Introduces the field of protein engineering. Develops understanding of key biophysical chemistry concepts in protein structure/function and their applications. Explores formulation of simple kinetic, statistical, and transport models for directed evolution and drug biodistribution. Students read and critically discuss seminal papers from the literature.
K. D. Wittrup
No required or recommended textbooks

10.536[J] Thermal Hydraulics in Power Technology
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.59[J], 22.313[J])
Prereq: 2.006, 10.302, 22.312, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-2-7
______
Emphasis on thermo-fluid dynamic phenomena and analysis methods for conventional and nuclear power stations. Kinematics and dynamics of two-phase flows. Steam separation. Boiling, instabilities, and critical conditions. Single-channel transient analysis. Multiple channels connected at plena. Loop analysis including single and two-phase natural circulation. Subchannel analysis.
M. Bucci

10.537[J] Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Biomechanics
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 2.798[J], 3.971[J], 6.4842[J], 20.410[J])
(Subject meets with 2.797[J], 3.053[J], 6.4840[J], 20.310[J])
Prereq: Biology (GIR) and 18.03
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR1-2.30 (4-237)
______
Develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales. Topics include structure of tissues and the molecular basis for macroscopic properties; chemical and electrical effects on mechanical behavior; cell mechanics, motility and adhesion; biomembranes; biomolecular mechanics and molecular motors. Experimental methods for probing structures at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
P. So, R. Raman
No textbook information available

10.538[J] Principles of Molecular Bioengineering
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 20.420[J])
Prereq: 7.06 and 18.03
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides an introduction to the mechanistic analysis and engineering of biomolecules and biomolecular systems. Covers methods for measuring, modeling, and manipulating systems, including biophysical experimental tools, computational modeling approaches, and molecular design. Equips students to take systematic and quantitative approaches to the investigation of a wide variety of biological phenomena.
A. Jasanoff, E. Fraenkel

10.539[J] Fields, Forces, and Flows in Biological Systems
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.795[J], 6.4832[J], 20.430[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Molecular diffusion, diffusion-reaction, conduction, convection in biological systems; fields in heterogeneous media; electrical double layers; Maxwell stress tensor, electrical forces in physiological systems. Fluid and solid continua: equations of motion useful for porous, hydrated biological tissues. Case studies of membrane transport, electrode interfaces, electrical, mechanical, and chemical transduction in tissues, convective-diffusion/reaction, electrophoretic, electroosmotic flows in tissues/MEMs, and ECG. Electromechanical and physicochemical interactions in cells and biomaterials; musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and other biological and clinical examples. Prior undergraduate coursework in transport recommended.
M. Bathe, A. Hansen

10.540 Intracellular Dynamics
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 7.06, 10.302, 18.03, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers current models and descriptions of the internal cell dynamics of macromolecules due to reaction and transport. Two major areas will be explored: the process of gene expression, including protein-DNA interactions, chromatin dynamics, and the stochastic nature of gene expression; and cell signaling systems, especially those that lead to or rely on intracellular protein gradients. This class is intended for graduate students or advanced undergraduates with some background in cell biology, transport, and kinetics. An introductory class in probability is recommended.
Staff

10.542 Biochemical Engineering and Biomanufacturing Principles
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 10.442)
Prereq: (5.07, 10.37, and (7.012, 7.013, 7.014, 7.015, or 7.016)) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
Lecture: MWF2 (66-156)
______
Explores the interactions of chemical engineering, biochemical engineering, and microbiology with particular emphasis on applications to bioprocess development. Examines mathematical representations of microbial systems, especially with regard to the kinetics of growth, death, and metabolism. Discusses the fundamentals of bioreactor design and operation, including continuous fermentation, mass transfer, and agitation. Examples encompass both enzyme and whole cell systems. Presents concepts in process development for microbial and animal cell cultures, with considerations towards production of biological products ranging from chiral specialty chemicals/pharmaceuticals to therapeutic proteins. Concludes with a discussion of aspects of cellular engineering and the role of molecular biology in addressing process development problems.
K. J. Prather, J. Leung
No textbook information available

10.544 Metabolic and Cell Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 7.05, 10.302, and 18.03
Units: 3-0-9
______
Presentation of a framework for quantitative understanding of cell functions as integrated molecular systems. Analysis of cell-level processes in terms of underlying molecular mechanisms based on thermodynamics, kinetics, mechanics, and transport principles, emphasizing an engineering, problem-oriented perspective. Objective is to rationalize target selection for genetic engineering and evaluate the physiology of recombinant cells. Topics include cell metabolism and energy production, transport across cell compartment barriers, protein synthesis and secretion, regulation of gene expression, transduction of signals from extracellular environment, cell proliferation, cell adhesion and migration.
Staff

10.545 Fundamentals of Metabolic and Biochemical Engineering: Applications to Biomanufacturing
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 10.345)
Prereq: 5.07, 7.05, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines the fundamentals of cell and metabolic engineering for biocatalyst design and optimization, as well as biochemical engineering principles for bioreactor design and operation, and downstream processing. Presents applications of microbial processes for production of commodity and specialty chemicals and biofuels in addition to mammalian cell cultures for production of biopharmaceuticals. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

10.546[J] Statistical Thermodynamics
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 5.70[J])
Prereq: 5.60 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Develops classical equilibrium statistical mechanical concepts for application to chemical physics problems. Basic concepts of ensemble theory formulated on the basis of thermodynamic fluctuations. Examples of applications include Ising models, lattice models of binding, ionic and non-ionic solutions, liquid theory, polymer and protein conformations, phase transition, and pattern formation. Introduces computational techniques with examples of liquid and polymer simulations.
B. Zhang, J. Cao

10.547[J] Principles and Practice of Drug Development
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 15.136[J], HST.920[J], IDS.620[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Description and critical assessment of the major issues and stages of developing a pharmaceutical or biopharmaceutical. Drug discovery, preclinical development, clinical investigation, manufacturing and regulatory issues considered for small and large molecules. Economic and financial considerations of the drug development process. Multidisciplinary perspective from faculty in clinical; life; and management sciences; as well as industry guests.
S. Finkelstein

10.548[J] Tumor Microenvironment and Immuno-Oncology: A Systems Biology Approach
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as HST.525[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4
______
Provides theoretical background to analyze and synthesize the most up-to-date findings from both laboratory and clinical investigations into solid tumor pathophysiology. Covers different topics centered on the critical role that the tumor microenvironment plays in the growth, invasion, metastasis and treatment of solid tumors. Develops a systems-level, quantitative understanding of angiogenesis, extracellular matrix, metastatic process, delivery of drugs and immune cells, and response to conventional and novel therapies, including immunotherapies. Discussions provide critical comments on the challenges and the future opportunities in research on cancer and in establishment of novel therapeutic approaches and biomarkers to guide treatment.
R. K. Jain

10.55 Colloid and Surfactant Science
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Introduces fundamental and applied aspects of colloidal dispersions, where the typical particle size is less than a micrometer. Discusses the characterization and unique behavior of colloidal dispersions, including their large surface-to-volume ratio, tendency to sediment in gravitational and centrifugal fields, diffusion characteristics, and ability to generate osmotic pressure and establish Donnan equilibrium. Covers the fundamentals of attractive van der Waals forces and repulsive electrostatic forces. Presents an in-depth discussion of electrostatic and polymer-induced colloid stabilization, including the DLVO theory of colloid stability. Presents an introductory discussion of surfactant physical chemistry.
D. Blankschtein

10.551 Systems Engineering
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 10.213, 10.302, and 10.37
Units: 3-0-6
Lecture: TR9.30-11 (56-114)
______
Introduction to the elements of systems engineering. Special attention devoted to those tools that help students structure and solve complex problems. Illustrative examples drawn from a broad variety of chemical engineering topics, including product development and design, process development and design, experimental and theoretical analysis of physico-chemical process, analysis of process operations.
R. D. Braatz, A. Dighe
No textbook information available

10.552 Modern Control Design
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 10.352)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
______
Covers modern methods for dynamical systems analysis, state estimation, controller design, and related topics. Uses example applications to demonstrate Lyapunov and linear matrix inequality-based methods that explicitly address actuator constraints, nonlinearities, and model uncertainties. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 30.
R. D. Braatz

10.553 Model Predictive Control
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 10.353)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
______
Provides an introduction to the multivariable control of dynamical systems with constraints on manipulated, state, and output variables. Covers multiple mathematical formulations that are popular in academia and industry, including dynamic matrix control and state-space model predictive control of uncertain, nonlinear, and large-scale systems. Uses numerous real industrial processes as examples. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
R. D. Braatz

10.554[J] Process Data Analytics
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.884[J])
(Subject meets with 2.874[J], 10.354[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 4-0-8
______
Provides an introduction to data analytics for manufacturing processes. Topics include chemometrics, discriminant analysis, hyperspectral imaging, machine learning, big data, Bayesian methods, experimental design, feature spaces, and pattern recognition as relevant to manufacturing process applications (e.g., output estimation, process control, and fault detection, identification and diagnosis). Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
R. D. Braatz, B. Anthony

10.555[J] Bioinformatics: Principles, Methods and Applications
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as HST.940[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduction to bioinformatics, the collection of principles and computational methods used to upgrade the information content of biological data generated by genome sequencing, proteomics, and cell-wide physiological measurements of gene expression and metabolic fluxes. Fundamentals from systems theory presented to define modeling philosophies and simulation methodologies for the integration of genomic and physiological data in the analysis of complex biological processes. Various computational methods address a broad spectrum of problems in functional genomics and cell physiology. Application of bioinformatics to metabolic engineering, drug design, and biotechnology also discussed.
Staff

10.557 Mixed-integer and Nonconvex Optimization
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 10.34 or 15.053
Units: 3-0-9
______
Presents the theory and practice of deterministic algorithms for locating the global solution of NP-hard optimization problems. Recurring themes and methods are convex relaxations, branch-and-bound, cutting planes, outer approximation and primal-relaxed dual approaches. Emphasis is placed on the connections between methods. These methods will be applied and illustrated in the development of algorithms for mixed-integer linear programs, mixed-integer convex programs, nonconvex programs, mixed-integer nonconvex programs, and programs with ordinary differential equations embedded. The broad range of engineering applications for these optimization formulations will also be emphasized. Students will be assessed on homework and a term project for which examples from own research are encouraged.
P. I. Barton

10.56 Advanced Topics in Surfactant Science
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Introduces fundamental advances and practical aspects of surfactant self-assembly in aqueous media. In-depth discussion of surfactant micellization, including statistical-thermodynamics of micellar solutions, models of micellar growth, molecular models for the free energy of micellization, and geometric packing theories. Presents an introductory examination of mixed micelle and vesicle formation, polymer-surfactant complexation, biomolecule-surfactant interactions, and micellar-assisted solubilization. Discusses molecular dynamics simulations of self-assembling systems. Covers recent advances in surfactant-induced dispersion and stabilization of colloidal particles (e.g., carbon nanotubes and graphene) in aqueous media. Examines surfactant applications in consumer products, environmental and biological separations, enhanced oil recovery using surfactant flooding, mitigation of skin irritation induced by surfactant-containing cosmetic products, and enhanced transdermal drug delivery using ultrasound and surfactants.
D. Blankschtein

10.560 Structure and Properties of Polymers
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 10.213 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Review of polymer molecular structure and bulk morphology; survey of molecular and morphological influence on bulk physical properties including non-Newtonian flow, macromolecular diffusion, gas transport in polymers, electrical and optical properties, solid-state deformation, and toughness. Case studies for product design.
Staff

10.562[J] Pioneering Technologies for Interrogating Complex Biological Systems
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 9.271[J], HST.562[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: MW10.30-12 (46-5313)
______
Introduces pioneering technologies in biology and medicine and discusses their underlying biological/molecular/engineering principles. Topics include emerging sample processing technologies, advanced optical imaging modalities, and next-gen molecular phenotyping techniques. Provides practical experience with optical microscopy and 3D phenotyping techniques. Limited to 15.
K. Chung
No required or recommended textbooks

10.566 Structure of Soft Matter
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 10.466)
Prereq: 5.60
Units: 3-0-6
______
Provides an introduction to the basic thermodynamic language used for describing the structure of materials, followed by a survey of the scattering, microscopy and spectroscopic techniques for structure and morphology characterization. Applies these concepts to a series of case studies illustrating the diverse structures formed in soft materials and the common length, time and energy scales that unify this field. For students interested in studying polymer science, colloid science, nanotechnology, biomaterials, and liquid crystals. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

10.568 Physical Chemistry of Polymers
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 3.063, 3.942)
Prereq: Prereq: 10.213, 10.40, or (5.601 AND 5.602)
Units: 3-0-9
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Introduction to polymer science from a molecular perspective. Covers topics in macromolecular confirmation and spatial extent, polymer solution thermodynamics and the theta state, linear viscoelasticity, rubber elasticity, and the thermodynamics and kinetics of formation of glasses and semicrystalline solids. Also provides a basic introduction to dynamics of macromolecules in solutions and melts, with entanglements. Presents methods for characterizing the molecular structure of polymers.
G. C. Rutledge, A. Alexander-Katz

10.569 Synthesis of Polymers
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 5.12
Units: 3-0-6
Lecture: MWF11 (66-154)
______
Studies synthesis of polymeric materials, emphasizing interrelationships of chemical pathways, process conditions, and microarchitecture of molecules produced. Chemical pathways include traditional approaches such as anionic, radical condensation, and ring-opening polymerizations. New techniques, including stable free radicals and atom transfer free radicals, new catalytic approaches to well-defined architectures, and polymer functionalization in bulk and at surfaces. Process conditions include bulk, solution, emulsion, suspension, gas phase, and batch vs continuous fluidized bed. Microarchitecture includes tacticity, molecular-weight distribution, sequence distributions in copolymers, errors in chains such as branches, head-to-head addition, and peroxide incorporation.
A. Furst
No textbook information available

10.571[J] Atmospheric Physics and Chemistry
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 12.806[J])
(Subject meets with 12.306)
Prereq: (18.075 and (5.60 or 5.61)) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR1.30-3 (54-517)
______
Introduction to the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere including experience with computer codes. Aerosols and theories of their formation, evolution, and removal. Gas and aerosol transport from urban to continental scales. Coupled models of radiation, transport, and chemistry. Solution of inverse problems to deduce emissions and removal rates. Emissions control technology and costs. Applications to air pollution and climate.
R. Prinn
No textbook information available

10.580 Solid-State Surface Science
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 10.213
Units: 3-0-6
______
Structural, chemical, and electronic properties of solids and solid surfaces. Analytical tools used to characterize surfaces including Auger and photoelectron spectroscopies and electron diffraction techniques. Surface thermodynamics and kinetics including adsorption-desorption, catalytic properties, and sputtering processes. Applications to microelectronics, optical materials, and catalysis.
Staff

10.585 Engineering Nanotechnology
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 10.213, 10.302, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Review of fundamental concepts of energy, mass and electron transport in materials confined or geometrically patterned at the nanoscale, where departures from classical laws are dominant. Specific applications to contemporary engineering challenges are discussed including problems in energy, biology, medicine, electronics, and material design.
M. Strano

10.586 Crystallization Science and Technology
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 10.213
Units: 3-0-6
______
Studies the nucleation and growth of crystals from a melt or a liquid solution and their important role in a wide range of applications, including pharmaeuticals, proteins, and semiconductor materials. Provides background information and covers topics needed to understand, perform experiments, construct and simulate mechanistic models, and design, monitor, and control crystallization processes. Limited to 30.
Staff

10.591 Case Studies in Bioengineering
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Biology (GIR) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Analysis and discussion of recent research in areas of bioengineering, including drug delivery, protein and tissue engineering, physiological transport, stem cell technology, and quantitative immunology by senior investigators in the Boston area. Students will read and critique papers, then have discussions with authors about their work.
C. K. Colton

10.595 Molecular Design and Bioprocess Development of Immunotherapies
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 10.495)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Examines challenges and opportunities for applying chemical engineering principles to address the growing global burden of infectious disease, including drug-resistant strains and neglected pathogens. Topics include a historical overview of vaccines and immunotherapies, the molecular design considerations for new immunotherapies and adjuvants, the economic challenges for process development and manufacturing of immunotherapies, and new technologies for designing and assessing therapies. Case studies to cover topics for specific diseases. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
J. C. Love

10.600[J] Dimensions of Geoengineering
______

Graduate (Fall); first half of term
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 1.850[J], 5.000[J], 11.388[J], 12.884[J], 15.036[J], 16.645[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4
______
Familiarizes students with the potential contributions and risks of using geoengineering technologies to control climate damage from global warming caused by greenhouse gas emissions. Discusses geoengineering in relation to other climate change responses: reducing emissions, removing CO2 from the atmosphere, and adapting to the impacts of climate change. Limited to 100.
J. Deutch, M. Zuber

10.606 Picturing Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (Spring); second half of term
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 1-2-2 [P/D/F]
______
Provides instruction in best practices for creating more effective graphics and photographs to support and communicate research in science and engineering. Discusses in depth specific examples from a range of scientific contexts, such as journal articles, presentations, grant submissions, and cover art. Topics include graphics for figures depicting form and structure, process, and change over time. Prepares students to create effective graphics for submissions to existing journals and calls attention to the future of published graphics with the advent of interactivity. Limited to 10.
Staff

10.621[J] Energy Systems for Climate Change Mitigation
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 1.670[J], IDS.521[J])
(Subject meets with 1.067[J], 10.421[J], IDS.065[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Reviews the contributions of energy systems to global greenhouse gas emissions, and the levers for reducing those emissions. Lectures and projects focus on evaluating energy systems against climate policy goals, using performance metrics such as cost, carbon intensity, and others. Student projects explore pathways for realizing emissions reduction scenarios. Projects address the climate change mitigation potential of energy technologies (hardware and software), technological and behavioral change trajectories, and technology and policy portfolios. Background in energy systems strongly recommended. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments and explore the subject in greater depth.
J. Trancik

10.625[J] Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage: Fundamentals, Materials and Applications
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 2.625[J])
Prereq: 2.005, 3.046, 3.53, 10.40, (2.051 and 2.06), or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
______
Fundamental concepts, tools, and applications in electrochemical science and engineering. Introduces thermodynamics, kinetics and transport of electrochemical reactions. Describes how materials structure and properties affect electrochemical behavior of particular applications, for instance in lithium rechargeable batteries, electrochemical capacitors, fuel cells, photo electrochemical cells, and electrolytic cells. Discusses state-of-the-art electrochemical energy technologies for portable electronic devices, hybrid and plug-in vehicles, electrical vehicles. Theoretical and experimental exploration of electrochemical measurement techniques in cell testing, and in bulk and interfacial transport measurements (electronic and ionic resistivity and charge transfer cross the electrode-electrolyte interface).
Y. Shao-Horn

10.626 Electrochemical Energy Systems
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 10.426)
Prereq: 10.50 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR11-12.30 (66-144) +final
______
Introduces electrochemical energy systems from the perspective of thermodynamics, kinetics, and transport. Surveys analysis and design of electrochemical reactions and processes by integrating chemical engineering fundamentals with knowledge from diverse fields, including chemistry, electrical engineering, and materials science. Includes applications to fuel cells, electrolyzers, and batteries. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
M. Z. Bazant
No textbook information available

10.631 Structural Theories of Polymer Fluid Mechanics
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 10.301
Units: 3-0-6
______
Structural and molecular models for polymeric liquids. Nonequilibrium properties are emphasized. Elementary kinetic theory of polymer solutions. General phase space kinetic for polymer melts and solutions. Network theories. Interrelations between structure and rheological properties.
Staff

10.637[J] Computational Chemistry
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 5.698[J])
(Subject meets with 5.697[J], 10.437[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Addresses both the theory and application of first-principles computer simulations methods (i.e., quantum, chemical, or electronic structure), including Hartree-Fock theory, density functional theory, and correlated wavefunction methods. Covers enhanced sampling, ab initio molecular dynamics, and transition-path-finding approaches as well as errors and accuracy in total and free energies. Discusses applications such as the study and prediction of properties of chemical systems, including heterogeneous, molecular, and biological catalysts (enzymes), and physical properties of materials. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 35; no listeners.
H. J. Kulik

10.643[J] Future Medicine: Drug Delivery, Therapeutics, and Diagnostics
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as HST.526[J])
(Subject meets with 10.443)
Prereq: 5.12 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Aims to describe the direction and future of medical technology. Introduces pharmaceutics, pharmacology, and conventional medical devices, then transitions to drug delivery systems, mechanical/electric-based and biological/cell-based therapies, and sensors. Covers nano- and micro drug delivery systems, including polymer-drug conjugates, protein therapeutics, liposomes and polymer nanoparticles, viral and non-viral genetic therapy, and tissue engineering. Previous coursework in cell biology and organic chemistry recommended. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 40.
Staff

10.65 Chemical Reactor Engineering
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 10.37 or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: MW9-11 (66-110) +final
______
Fundamentals of chemically reacting systems with emphasis on synthesis of chemical kinetics and transport phenomena. Topics include kinetics of gas, liquid, and surface reactions; quantum chemistry; transition state theory; surface adsorption, diffusion, and desorption processes; mechanism and kinetics of biological processes; mechanism formulation and sensitivity analysis. Reactor topics include nonideal flow reactors, residence time distribution and dispersion models; multiphase reaction systems; nonlinear reactor phenomena. Examples are drawn from different applications, including heterogeneous catalysis, polymerization, combustion, biochemical systems, and materials processing.
M. Strano
No textbook information available

10.652[J] Kinetics of Chemical Reactions
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 5.68[J])
Prereq: 5.62, 10.37, or 10.65
Units: 3-0-6
______
Experimental and theoretical aspects of chemical reaction kinetics, including transition-state theories, molecular beam scattering, classical techniques, quantum and statistical mechanical estimation of rate constants, pressure-dependence and chemical activation, modeling complex reacting mixtures, and uncertainty/ sensitivity analyses. Reactions in the gas phase, liquid phase, and on surfaces are discussed with examples drawn from atmospheric, combustion, industrial, catalytic, and biological chemistry.
W. H. Green

10.668[J] Statistical Mechanics of Polymers
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 3.941[J])
Prereq: 10.568 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Concepts of statistical mechanics and thermodynamics applied to macromolecules: polymer conformations in melts, solutions, and gels; Rotational Isomeric State theory, Markov processes and molecular simulation methods applied to polymers; incompatibility and segregation in incompressible and compressible systems; molecular theory of viscoelasticity; relation to scattering and experimental measurements.
G. C. Rutledge, A. Alexander-Katz

10.677 Topics in Applied Microfluidics
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 10.301 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Provides an introduction to the field of microfluidics. Reviews fundamental concepts in transport phenomena and dimensional analysis, focusing on new phenomena which arise at small scales. Discusses current applications, with an emphasis on the contributions engineers bring to the field. Local and visiting experts in the field discuss their work. Limited to 30.
P. Doyle

10.689 Concepts in Modern Heterogeneous Catalysis
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 10.489)
Prereq: 10.302 and 10.37
Units: 3-0-6
______
Explores topics in the design and implementation of heterogeneous catalysts for chemical transformations. Emphasizes use of catalysis for environmentally benign and sustainable chemical processes. Lectures address concepts in catalyst preparation, catalyst characterization, quantum chemical calculations, and microkinetic analysis of catalytic processes. Shows how experimental and theoretical approaches can illustrate important reactive intermediates and transition states involved in chemical reaction pathways, and uses that information to help identify possible new catalysts that may facilitate reactions of interest. Draws examples from current relevant topics in catalysis. Includes a group project in which students investigate a specific topic in greater depth. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

10.7003[J] Applied Molecular Biology Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Partial Lab
(Same subject as 7.003[J])
Prereq: 7.002
Units: 2-7-3
Lecture: T1 (68-181) Lab: T2-5,R1-5 (68-074) Recitation: T11-12.30 (68-121, 68-156)
______
Laboratory-based exploration of modern experimental molecular biology. Specific experimental system studied may vary from term to term, depending on instructor. Emphasizes concepts of experimental design, data analysis and communication in biology and how these concepts are applied in the biotechnology industry. Satisfies 6 units of Institute Laboratory credit. Enrollment limited; admittance may be controlled by lottery.
Fall: E. Calo
Spring: L. Case
No required or recommended textbooks

10.792[J] Global Operations Leadership Seminar
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
(Same subject as 2.890[J], 15.792[J], 16.985[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-0 [P/D/F]
Lecture: M EVE (4-6 PM) (E62-223)
______
Integrative forum in which worldwide leaders in business, finance, government, sports, and education share their experiences and insights with students aspiring to run global operations. Students play a large role in managing the seminar. Preference to LGO students.
Fall: T. Roemer
Spring: T. Roemer
No textbook information available

10.801 Project Management and Problem Solving in Academia and Industry
______

Graduate (IAP)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-3
______
Teaches both soft and hard skills to foster student success through one-month team projects, as part of the Master of Science in Chemical Engineering Practice (M.S.CEP) program. The same skills are expected to be valuable for problem-solving in both academic and industrial settings at large. Themes to be covered include career development, project management, leadership, project economics, techniques for problem solving, literature search, safety, professional behavior, and time management. Students participate in activities and discussions during class time, study preparatory and review materials on MITx and complete active-learning assessments between meetings, and complete a quiz at the end of the course. Enrollment will be limited to students in the School of Chemical Engineering Practice.
T. Hatton
No textbook information available

10.805[J] Technology, Law, and the Working Environment
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as IDS.436[J])
(Subject meets with 1.802[J], 1.812[J], 11.022[J], 11.631[J], IDS.061[J], IDS.541[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Addresses relationship between technology-related problems and the law applicable to work environment. National Labor Relations Act, Occupational Safety and Health Act. Toxic Substances Control Act, state worker's compensation, and suits by workers in the courts discussed. Problems related to occupational health and safety, collective bargaining as a mechanism for altering technology in the workplace, job alienation, productivity, and the organization of work addressed. Prior courses or experience in the environmental, public health, or law-related areas.
Staff

10.806 Management in Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 2.96, 6.9360, 10.806, 16.653)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-1-8
______
Introduction and overview of engineering management. Financial principles, management of innovation, technical strategy and best management practices. Case study method of instruction emphasizes participation in class discussion. Focus is on the development of individual skills and management tools. Restricted to juniors and seniors.
J-H Chun, A. Weiss

10.807[J] Innovation Teams
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.907[J], 15.371[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 4-4-4
______
Introduces skills and capabilities for real-world problem solving to take technology from lab to societal impact: technical and functional exploration, opportunity discovery, market understanding, value economics, scale-up, intellectual property, and communicating/working for impact across disciplines. Students work in multidisciplinary teams formed around MIT research breakthroughs, with extensive in-class coaching and guidance from faculty, lab members, and select mentors. Follows a structured approach to innovating in which everything is a variable and the product, technology, and opportunities for new ventures can be seen as an act of synthesis. Teams gather evidence that permits a fact-based iteration across multiple application domains, markets, functionalities, technologies, and products, leading to a recommendation that maps a space of opportunity and includes actionable next steps to evolve the market and technology.
L. Perez-Breva, D. Hart

10.817[J] Atmospheric Chemistry
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 1.84[J], 12.807[J])
Prereq: 5.601 and 5.602
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides a detailed overview of the chemical transformations that control the abundances of key trace species in the Earth's atmosphere. Emphasizes the effects of human activity on air quality and climate. Topics include photochemistry, kinetics, and thermodynamics important to the chemistry of the atmosphere; stratospheric ozone depletion; oxidation chemistry of the troposphere; photochemical smog; aerosol chemistry; and sources and sinks of greenhouse gases and other climate forcers.
J. Kroll

School of Chemical Engineering Practice

10.80 (10.82, 10.84, 10.86) School of Chemical Engineering Practice -- Technical Accomplishment
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring, Summer)
Prereq: None
Units: 0-6-0
10.80: TBA.
10.82: TBA.
10.84: TBA.
10.86: TBA.
______
Conducted at industrial field stations of the School of Chemical Engineering Practice. Group problem assignments include process development design, simulation and control, technical service, and new-product development. Grading based on technical accomplishment. Credit granted in lieu of master's thesis. See departmental descripton on School of Chemical Engineering Practice for details. Enrollment limited and subject to plant availability.
Fall: T. Hatton
Spring: T. Hatton
Summer: T. Hatton
10.80: No textbook information available
10.82: No textbook information available
10.84: No required or recommended textbooks
10.86: No required or recommended textbooks

10.81 (10.83, 10.85, 10.87) School of Chemical Engineering Practice -- Communication Skills and Human Relations
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring, Summer)
Prereq: None
Units: 0-6-0
10.81: TBA.
10.83: TBA.
10.85: TBA.
10.87: TBA.
______
Conducted at industrial field stations of the School of Chemical Engineering Practice. Group problem assignments include process development, design, simulation and control, technical service, and new-product development. Grading based on communication skills and human relations in group assignments. Credit granted in lieu of master's thesis; see departmental description on School of Chemical Engineering Practice for details. Enrollment limited and subject to plant availability.
Fall: T. Hatton
Spring: T. Hatton
Summer: T. Hatton
10.81: No textbook information available
10.83: No textbook information available
10.85: No textbook information available
10.87: No textbook information available


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