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Course 22: Nuclear Science and Engineering
IAP/Spring 2024


Undergraduate Subjects

22.00 Introduction to Modeling and Simulation
______

Undergrad (Spring) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 1.021, 3.021, 10.333, 22.00)
Prereq: 18.03, 3.016B, or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: TR3-4.30 (4-231) Recitation: W3 (24-121)
______
Basic concepts of computer modeling and simulation in science and engineering. Uses techniques and software for simulation, data analysis and visualization. Continuum, mesoscale, atomistic and quantum methods used to study fundamental and applied problems in physics, chemistry, materials science, mechanics, engineering, and biology. Examples drawn from the disciplines above are used to understand or characterize complex structures and materials, and complement experimental observations.
M. Buehler, A. Hoffman
No textbook information available

22.003 NEET Seminar: Renewable Energy Machines
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 1-0-2 [P/D/F]
Lecture: T EVE (7 PM) (3-001)
______
Seminar for students enrolled in the Renewable Energy Machines NEET thread. Focuses on topics around renewable energy via guest lectures and research discussions.
Fall: E. Melenbrink
Spring: E. Melenbrink
No required or recommended textbooks

22.01 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering and Ionizing Radiation
______

Undergrad (Fall) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
Prereq: None
Units: 3-1-8
______
Provides an introduction to nuclear science and its engineering applications. Describes basic nuclear models, radioactivity, nuclear reactions and kinematics. Covers the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter, with an emphasis on radiation detection, radiation shielding, and radiation effects on human health. Presents energy systems based on fission and fusion nuclear reactions, as well as industrial and medical applications of nuclear science. Lectures are viewed outside of class; in-class time is dedicated to problem-solving and discussion.
E. Jossou

22.011 Nuclear Engineering: Science, Systems, and Society
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: None
Units: 1-0-2 [P/D/F]
______
Discusses the field of nuclear science and engineering, including technologies essential to combating climate change and ensuring human health and well-being. Introduces and provides beginner-level experience with programming, radiation, detection, nuclear physics, and nuclear engineering. Students work on projects such as building radiation-sensing robots to navigate a maze of radioactive sources using autonomous navigation via machine learning. No previous experience with electronics, building robots, programming, or nuclear science required. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first-year students. Limited to 20. Preference to first-year undergraduates.
Staff

22.014 Ethics for Engineers
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring)
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 1.082, 2.900, 6.9320, 10.01, 16.676, 22.014)
(Subject meets with 6.9321, 20.005)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4
URL: https://e4e.mit.edu/
Lecture: M3-5 (66-148) or T3-5 (66-148) or W3-5 (66-148) or W EVE (7-9 PM) (66-148)
______
Explores how to be an ethical engineer. Students examine engineering case studies along with foundational ethical readings, and investigate which ethical approaches are best and how to apply them as engineers. Topics include justice, rights, cost-benefit analysis, safety, bias, genetic engineering, climate change, and the promise and peril of AI. Discussion-based. All sections cover the same core ethical frameworks, but some sections have a particular focus for engineering case studies, such as Computer Science or Bioengineering. Students are eligible to take any section of the course, regardless of their registered course number. The subject is taught in separate sections. For 20.005, students additionally undertake an ethical-technical analysis of a BE-related topic of their choosing.
Fall: B. L. Trout, P. Hansen, D. Lauffenburger, K. Hansen
Spring: P. Hansen, M. Hemann, D. Lauffenburger, K. Hansen
No required or recommended textbooks

22.015 Radiation and Life: Applications of Radiation Sources in Medicine, Research, and Industry
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-0 [P/D/F]
______
Introduces students to the basics of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation; radiation safety and protection; and an overview of the variety of health physics applications, especially as it pertains to the medical field and to radioactive materials research in academia. Presents basic physics of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation, known effects of the human body, and the techniques to measure those effects. Common radiation-based medical imaging techniques and therapies discussed. Projects, demonstrations, and experiments introduce students to standard techniques and practices in typical medical and MIT research lab environments where radiation is used. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first-year students. Limited to 10. Preference to first-year students.
T. Durak

22.016 Seminar in Fusion and Plasma Physics
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 1-0-0 [P/D/F]
______
Discusses the challenges and opportunities on the path to fusion energy through a range of plasma and fusion energy topics, including discussion of the global energy picture, basic plasma physics, the physics of fusion, fusion reactors, tokamaks, and inertial confinement facilities. Covers why nuclear science, computer science, and materials are so important for fusion, and how students can take next steps to study fusion while at MIT. Includes tours of laboratories at the Plasma Science and Fusion Center. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first-year students. Limited to 20. Preference to first years and sophomores majoring in Course 22.
E. Peterson

22.017 Nuclear in the News
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 1-0-1 [P/D/F]
______
Covers the state of nuclear energy and technologies in popular media and current events. Topics include: modern-day Chernobyl, advances in fission reactor building, and the corporate use of fusion devices. Discussions guided by student interest and questions. Includes presentations by expert faculty in nuclear science and engineering. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first-year students.
Staff

22.02 Introduction to Applied Nuclear Physics
______

Undergrad (Spring) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
Prereq: None
Units: 5-0-7
Lecture: MW9.30-11 (24-115) Recitation: F2-4 (24-112)
______
Covers basic concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on nuclear structure and interactions of radiation with matter. Topics include elementary quantum theory; nuclear forces; shell structure of the nucleus; alpha, beta and gamma radioactive decays; interactions of nuclear radiations (charged particles, gammas, and neutrons) with matter; nuclear reactions; fission and fusion.
M. Li
No required or recommended textbooks

22.022 Quantum Technology and Devices
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 8.751[J], 22.51[J])
Prereq: 8.04, 22.02, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR9-10.30 (36-372)
______
Examines the unique features of quantum theory to generate technologies with capabilities beyond any classical device. Introduces fundamental concepts in applied quantum mechanics, tools and applications of quantum technology, with a focus on quantum information processing beyond quantum computation. Includes discussion of quantum devices and experimental platforms drawn from active research in academia and industry. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
P. Cappellaro
No required or recommended textbooks

22.03[J] Introduction to Design Thinking and Rapid Prototyping
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 3.0061[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-2-2
______
Focuses on design thinking, an iterative process that uses divergent and convergent thinking to approach design problems and prototype and test solutions. Includes experiences in creativity, problem scoping, and rapid prototyping skills. Skills are built over the course of the semester through design exercises and projects. Enrollment limited; preference to Course 22 & Course 3 majors and minors, and NEET students.
E. Melenbrink

22.033 Nuclear Systems Design Project
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 22.33)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-12
______
Group design project involving integration of nuclear physics, particle transport, control, heat transfer, safety, instrumentation, materials, environmental impact, and economic optimization. Provides opportunity to synthesize knowledge acquired in nuclear and non-nuclear subjects and apply this knowledge to practical problems of current interest in nuclear applications design. Past projects have included using a fusion reactor for transmutation of nuclear waste, design and implementation of an experiment to predict and measure pebble flow in a pebble bed reactor, and development of a mission plan for a manned Mars mission including the conceptual design of a nuclear powered space propulsion system and power plant for the Mars surface, a lunar/Martian nuclear power station and the use of nuclear plants to extract oil from tar sands. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Z. Hartwig

22.039 Integration of Reactor Design, Operations, and Safety
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 22.39)
Prereq: 22.05 and 22.06
Units: 3-2-7
______
Covers the integration of reactor physics and engineering sciences into nuclear power plant design, focusing on designs projected to be used in the first half of this century. Topics include materials issues in plant design and operations, aspects of thermal design, fuel depletion and fission-product poisoning, and temperature effects on reactivity. Addresses safety considerations in regulations and operations, such as the evolution of the regulatory process, the concept of defense in depth, general design criteria, accident analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and risk-informed regulations.  Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
K. Shirvan

22.04[J] Social Problems of Nuclear Energy
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as STS.084[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Surveys the major social challenges for nuclear energy. Topics include the ability of nuclear power to help mitigate climate change; challenges associated with ensuring nuclear safety; the effects of nuclear accidents; the management of nuclear waste; the linkages between nuclear power and nuclear weapons, the consequences of nuclear war; and political challenges to the safe and economic regulation of the nuclear industry. Weekly readings presented from both sides of the debate, followed by in-class discussions. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication provided. Limited to 18.
R. Kemp

22.05 Neutron Science and Reactor Physics
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: 18.03, 22.01, and (1.000, 2.086, 6.100B, or 12.010)
Units: 5-0-7
______
Introduces fundamental properties of the neutron. Covers reactions induced by neutrons, nuclear fission, slowing down of neutrons in infinite media, diffusion theory, the few-group approximation, point kinetics, and fission-product poisoning. Emphasizes the nuclear physics bases of reactor design and its relationship to reactor engineering problems.
B. Ganapol

22.051 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 22.251)
Prereq: 22.05
Units: 3-2-7
______
Studies the relationship between technical and policy elements of the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment, fuel fabrication, in-core reactivity and fuel management of uranium and other fuel types, used fuel reprocessing, and waste disposal. Presents principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors. Examines nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of long lived radioisotopes in spent fuel. Several state-of-the-art computer programs relevant to reactor core physics and heat transfer are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers.  Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

22.052 Quantum Theory of Materials Characterization
(New)
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 22.52)
Prereq: 8.231 or 22.02
Units: 3-0-9
______
Holistic theoretical foundation of characterization techniques with photons, electrons, and neutron probes in various spaces. Techniques for assessing real space, reciprocal space, energy space, and time space utilizing microscopy, diffraction, spectroscopy, and time-domain methods. Elucidation of microscopic interaction mechanisms of materials. Practical assessment of what each characterization measures, methods for linking experimental features to microscopic materials information, state of the art methods for combining information, and machine learning aids. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
M. Li

22.054[J] Materials Performance in Extreme Environments
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 3.154[J])
Prereq: 3.013 and 3.044
Units: 3-2-7
______
Studies the behavior of materials in extreme environments typical of those in which advanced energy systems (including fossil, nuclear, solar, fuel cells, and battery) operate. Takes both a science and engineering approach to understanding how current materials interact with their environment under extreme conditions. Explores the role of modeling and simulation in understanding material behavior and the design of new materials. Focuses on energy and transportation related systems.
Staff

22.055 Radiation Biophysics
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 22.55[J], HST.560[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides a background in sources of radiation with an emphasis on terrestrial and space environments and on industrial production. Discusses experimental approaches to evaluating biological effects resulting from irradiation regimes differing in radiation type, dose and dose-rate. Effects at the molecular, cellular, organism, and population level are examined. Literature is reviewed identifying gaps in our understanding of the health effects of radiation, and responses of regulatory bodies to these gaps is discussed. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
R. Gupta

22.06 Engineering of Nuclear Systems
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 2.005
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: TR9.30-11 (24-121) Recitation: F11 (24-112)
______
Using the basic principles of reactor physics, thermodynamics, fluid flow and heat transfer, students examine the engineering design of nuclear power plants. Emphasizes light-water reactor technology, thermal limits in nuclear fuels, thermal-hydraulic behavior of the coolant, nuclear safety and dynamic response of nuclear power plants.
M. Bucci
No required or recommended textbooks

22.061 Fusion Energy
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 22.01 or permission of instructor
Units: 4-1-7
Lecture: MW11-12.30 (24-112) Lab: T3 (24-112)
______
Surveys the fundamental science and engineering required to generate energy from controlled nuclear fusion. Topics include nuclear physics governing fusion fuel choice and fusion reactivity, physical conditions required to achieve net fusion energy, plasma physics of magnetic confinement, overview of fusion energy concepts, material challenges in fusion systems, superconducting magnet engineering, and fusion power conversion to electricity. Includes in-depth visits at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and active learning laboratories to reinforce lecture topics.
Z. Hartwig
No required or recommended textbooks

22.071 Analog Electronics and Analog Instrumentation Design
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
Prereq: 18.03
Units: 3-3-6
______
Presents the basics of analog electronics, covering everything from basic resistors to non-linear devices such as diodes and transistors. Students build amplifiers with op amps and study the behavior of first- and second-order oscillating circuits. Lectures followed by short laboratory exercises reinforce theoretical knowledge with experiments. Includes project in second half of the term in which students design radiation instruments of their choice (e.g. Geiger radiation counters, or other types of sensors and instruments). Teaches use of Arduino microcontrollers as simple data acquisition systems, allowing for real-time data processing and display. Culminates in student presentations of their designs in an open forum. Limited to 20.
Staff

22.072 Corrosion: The Environmental Degradation of Materials
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 22.72)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Applies thermodynamics and kinetics of electrode reactions to aqueous corrosion of metals and alloys. Application of advanced computational and modeling techniques to evaluation of materials selection and susceptibility of metal/alloy systems to environmental degradation in aqueous systems. Discusses materials degradation problems in marine environments, oil and gas production, and energy conversion and generation systems, including fossil and nuclear.  Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. 
Staff

22.074 Radiation Damage and Effects in Nuclear Materials
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 3.31[J], 22.74[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Studies the origins and effects of radiation damage in structural materials for nuclear applications. Radiation damage topics include formation of point defects, defect diffusion, defect reaction kinetics and accumulation, and differences in defect microstructures due to the type of radiation (ion, proton, neutron). Radiation effects topics include detrimental changes to mechanical properties, phase stability, corrosion properties, and differences in fission and fusion systems. Term project required. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
M. Short
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

22.078 Nuclear Waste Management
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 22.78)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces the essential knowledge for understanding nuclear waste management. Includes material flow sheets for nuclear fuel cycle, waste characteristics, sources of radioactive wastes, compositions, radioactivity and heat generation, chemical processing technologies, geochemistry, waste disposal technologies, environmental regulations and the safety assessment of waste disposal. Covers different types of wastes: uranium mining waste, low-level radioactive waste, high-level radioactive waste and fusion waste. Provides the quantitative methods to compare the environmental impact of different nuclear and other energy-associated waste. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
H. Wainwright

22.081[J] Introduction to Sustainable Energy
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.650[J], 10.291[J])
(Subject meets with 1.818[J], 2.65[J], 10.391[J], 11.371[J], 22.811[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-1-8
______
Assessment of current and potential future energy systems. Covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting 21st-century regional and global energy needs in a sustainable manner. Examines various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Investigates their attributes within a quantitative analytical framework for evaluation of energy technology system proposals. Emphasizes analysis of energy propositions within an engineering, economic and social context. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to juniors and seniors.
M. Golay

22.09 Principles of Nuclear Radiation Measurement and Protection
______

Undergrad (Fall) Institute Lab
(Subject meets with 22.90)
Prereq: 22.01
Units: 1-5-9
______
Combines lectures, demonstrations, and experiments. Review of radiation protection procedures and regulations; theory and use of alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron detectors; applications in imaging and dosimetry; gamma-ray spectroscopy; design and operation of automated data acquisition experiments using virtual instruments. Meets with graduate subject 22.90, but homework assignments and examinations differ. Instruction and practice in written communication provided.
A. Danagoulian

22.091, 22.093 Independent Project in Nuclear Science and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
22.091: TBA.
22.093: TBA.
______
For undergraduates who wish to conduct a one-term project of theoretical or experimental nature in the field of nuclear engineering, in close cooperation with individual staff members. Topics and hours arranged to fit students' requirements. Projects require prior approval by the Course 22 Undergraduate Office. 22.093 is graded P/D/F.
Fall: Contact NSE Academic Office
IAP: Contact NSE Academic Office
Spring: Contact NSE Academic Office
Summer: Contact NSE Academic Office
22.091: No required or recommended textbooks
22.093: No required or recommended textbooks

22.099 Topics in Nuclear Science and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
TBA.
______
Provides credit for work on material in nuclear science and engineering outside of regularly scheduled subjects. Intended for study abroad with a student exchange program or an approved one-term or one-year study abroad program. Credit may be used to satisfy specific SB degree requirements. Requires prior approval. Consult department.
Fall: B. Baker
Spring: B. Baker
No required or recommended textbooks

22.S092-22.S094 Special Subject in Nuclear Science and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
22.S094: Lecture: TR11.30-1 (NW21-154A)
______
Seminar or lecture on a topic in nuclear science and engineering that is not covered in the regular curriculum.
E. Melenbrink
22.S094: No required or recommended textbooks

22.S095 Special Subject in Nuclear Science and Engineering
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
______
Seminar or lecture on a topic in nuclear science and engineering that is not covered in the regular curriculum.
Staff

22.S097 Special Subject in Nuclear Science and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Lecture: R4 (NW17-218)
______
Seminar or lecture on a topic in nuclear science and engineering that is not covered in the regular curriculum.
Fall: R. Shulman
Spring: R. Shulman
No required or recommended textbooks

22.C01 Modeling with Machine Learning: Nuclear Science and Engineering Applications
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 22.C51)
Prereq: Calculus II (GIR) and 6.100A; Coreq: 6.C01
Units: 2-0-4
Credit cannot also be received for 1.C01, 1.C51, 2.C01, 2.C51, 3.C01, 3.C51, 7.C01, 7.C51, 10.C01, 10.C51, 20.C01, 20.C51, 22.C51, SCM.C51
Lecture: F11-1 (24-115)
______
Building on core material in 6.C01, focuses on applying various machine learning techniques to a broad range of topics which are of core value in modern nuclear science and engineering. Relevant topics include machine learning on fusion and plasma diagnosis, reactor physics and nuclear fission, nuclear materials properties, quantum engineering and nuclear materials, and nuclear security. Special components center on the additional machine learning architectures that are most relevant to a certain field, the implementation, and picking up the right problems to solve using a machine learning approach. Final project dedicated to the field-specific applications. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Students cannot receive credit without simultaneous completion of the core subject 6.C01.
E. Jossou
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

22.C25[J] Real World Computation with Julia
(New)
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 1.C25[J], 6.C25[J], 12.C25[J], 16.C25[J], 18.C25[J])
Prereq: 6.100A, 18.03, and 18.06
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on algorithms and techniques for writing and using modern technical software in a job, lab, or research group environment that may consist of interdisciplinary teams, where performance may be critical, and where the software needs to be flexible and adaptable. Topics include automatic differentiation, matrix calculus, scientific machine learning, parallel and GPU computing, and performance optimization with introductory applications to climate science, economics, agent-based modeling, and other areas. Labs and projects focus on performant, readable, composable algorithms, and software. Programming will be in Julia. Expects students to have some familiarity with Python, Matlab, or R. No Julia experience necessary.
A. Edelman, R. Ferrari, B. Forget, C. Leiseron,Y. Marzouk, J. Williams

22.C51 Modeling with Machine Learning: Nuclear Science and Engineering Applications
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 22.C01)
Prereq: Calculus II (GIR) and 6.100A; Coreq: 6.C51
Units: 2-0-4
Credit cannot also be received for 1.C01, 1.C51, 2.C01, 2.C51, 3.C01, 3.C51, 7.C01, 7.C51, 10.C01, 10.C51, 20.C01, 20.C51, 22.C01, SCM.C51
Lecture: F11-1 (24-115)
______
Building on core material in 6.C51, focuses on applying various machine learning techniques to a broad range of topics which are of core value in modern nuclear science and engineering. Relevant topics include machine learning on fusion and plasma diagnosis, reactor physics and nuclear fission, nuclear materials properties, quantum engineering and nuclear materials, and nuclear security. Special components center on the additional machine learning architectures that are most relevant to a certain field, the implementation, and picking up the right problems to solve using a machine learning approach. Final project dedicated to the field-specific applications. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Students cannot receive credit without simultaneous completion of the core subject 6.C51.
Staff
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

22.EPE UPOP Engineering Practice Experience
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 1.EPE, 2.EPE, 3.EPE, 6.EPE, 8.EPE, 10.EPE, 15.EPE, 16.EPE, 20.EPE, 22.EPE)
Prereq: None
Units: 0-0-1 [P/D/F]
Lecture: TBA
______
Provides students with skills to prepare for and excel in the world of industry. Emphasizes practical application of career theory and professional development concepts. Introduces students to relevant and timely resources for career development, provides students with tools to embark on a successful internship search, and offers networking opportunities with employers and MIT alumni. Students work in groups, led by industry mentors, to improve their resumes and cover letters, interviewing skills, networking abilities, project management, and ability to give and receive feedback. Objective is for students to be able to adapt and contribute effectively to their future employment organizations. A total of two units of credit is awarded for completion of the fall and subsequent spring term offerings. Application required; consult UPOP website for more information.
Fall: D. Fordell, C. Greaney
Spring: D. Fordell, C. Greaney
No required or recommended textbooks

22.EPW UPOP Engineering Practice Workshop
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring)
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 1.EPW, 2.EPW, 3.EPW, 6.EPW, 10.EPW, 16.EPW, 20.EPW, 22.EPW)
Prereq: 2.EPE
Units: 1-0-0 [P/D/F]
TBA.
______
Provides sophomores across all majors with opportunities to develop and practice communication, teamwork, and problem-solving skills to become successful professionals in the workplace, particularly in preparation for their summer industry internship. This immersive, multi-day Team Training Workshop (TTW) is comprised of experiential learning modules focused on expanding skills in areas that employers report being most valuable in the workplace. Modules are led by MIT faculty with the help of MIT alumni and other senior industry professionals. Skills applied through creative simulations, team problem-solving challenges, oral presentations, and networking sessions with prospective employers. Enrollment limited to those in the UPOP program.
IAP: C. Greaney
Spring: C. Greaney
No textbook information available (IAP 2024); No required or recommended textbooks (Spring 2024)

22.THT Undergraduate Thesis Tutorial
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 1-0-2 [P/D/F]
______
A series of lectures on prospectus and thesis writing. Students select a thesis topic and a thesis advisor who reviews and approves the prospectus for thesis work in the spring term.
P. Cappellaro

22.THU Undergraduate Thesis
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: 22.THT
Units arranged
TBA.
______
Program of research, leading to the writing of an SB thesis, to be arranged by the student and appropriate MIT faculty member. See department undergraduate headquarters.
Fall: J. Buongiorno
IAP: J. Buongiorno
Spring: J. Buongiorno
Summer: J. Buongiorno
No required or recommended textbooks

22.UAR[J] Climate and Sustainability Undergraduate Advanced Research
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
(Same subject as 1.UAR[J], 3.UAR[J], 5.UAR[J], 11.UAR[J], 12.UAR[J], 15.UAR[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
Lecture: TR4 (32-144)
______
Provides instruction in effective research, experiential projects, internships, and externships, including choosing and refining problems, surveying previous work and publications, industry best practices, design for robustness, technical presentation, authorship and collaboration, and ethics. Supporting content includes background and context pertaining to climate change and sustainability, as well as tools for sustainable design. Focus for project work includes research topics relevant to the MIT Climate & Sustainability Consortium (MCSC). Students engage in extensive written and oral communication exercises, in the context of an approved advanced research project. A total of 12 units of credit is awarded for completion of the spring and subsequent fall term offerings. Application required; consult MCSC website for more information.
Fall: E. Olivetti, J. Grossman
Spring: E. Olivetti, J. Grossman
No required or recommended textbooks

22.UR Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
TBA.
______
The Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program is an excellent way for undergraduate students to become familiar with the Department of Nuclear Engineering. Student research as a UROP project has been conducted in areas of fission reactor studies, utilization of fusion devices, applied radiation research, and biomedical applications. Projects include the study of engineering aspects for both fusion and fission energy sources.
Fall: B. Baker
IAP: B. Baker
Spring: B. Baker
Summer: B. Baker
No required or recommended textbooks

22.URG Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
TBA.
______
The Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program is an excellent way for undergraduate students to become familiar with the department of Nuclear Science and Engineering. Student research as a UROP project has been conducted in areas of fission reactor studies, utilization of fusion devices, applied radiation physics research, and biomedical applications. Projects include the study of engineering aspects for fusion and fission energy sources, and utilization of radiations.
Fall: B. Baker
IAP: B. Baker
Spring: B. Baker
Summer: B. Baker
No required or recommended textbooks


left arrow | 22.00-22.099 plus UROP, UPOP, and ThU | 22.101-22.599 | 22.60-22.THG | right arrow



Produced: 18-APR-2024 05:10 PM