Registrar Home | Registrar Search:
 
  MIT Course Picker | MIT Course Planner     
Home | Subject Search | Help | Symbols Help | Pre-Reg Help | Final Exam Schedule
 

Course 1: Civil and Environmental Engineering
IAP/Spring 2024


Fundamentals

1.00 Engineering Computation and Data Science
______

Undergrad (Spring) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
(Subject meets with 1.001)
Prereq: Calculus I (GIR)
Units: 3-2-7
Lecture: MW9.30-11 (1-390) Lab: F9-11 (1-390)
______
Presents engineering problems in a computational setting with emphasis on data science and problem abstraction. Covers exploratory data analysis and visualization, filtering, regression. Building basic machine learning models (classifiers, decision trees, clustering) for smart city applications. Labs and programming projects focused on analytics problems faced by cities, infrastructure, and environment. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments and project work.
J. Williams
No required or recommended textbooks

1.000 Introduction to Computer Programming and Numerical Methods for Engineering Applications
______

Undergrad (Fall) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
Prereq: None. Coreq: 18.03
Units: 3-2-7
______
Presents the fundamentals of computing and computer programming (procedural and object-oriented programming) in an engineering context. Introduces logical operations, floating-point arithmetic, data structures, induction, iteration, and recursion. Computational methods for interpolation, regression, root finding, sorting, searching, and the solution of linear systems of equations and ordinary differential equations. Control of sensors and visualization of scientific data. Draws examples from engineering and scientific applications. Students use the MATLAB programming environment to complete weekly assignments.
R. Juanes

1.001 Engineering Computation and Data Science
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.00)
Prereq: Calculus I (GIR)
Units: 3-2-7
Lecture: MW9.30-11 (1-390) Lab: F9-11 (1-390)
______
Presents engineering problems in a computational setting with emphasis on data science and problem abstraction. Covers exploratory data analysis and visualization, filtering, regression. Building basic machine learning models (classifiers, decision trees, clustering) for smart city applications. Labs and programming projects focused on analytics problems faced by cities, infrastructure and environment. Students taking graduate version will complete additional assignments and project work.
J. Williams
No required or recommended textbooks

1.004 Startup Sustainable Tech
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.147)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides a practical introduction to key innovations in the fields of civil and environmental engineering that are currently having an impact. Structured around the different aspects of starting and maintaining a company in the first years after incorporation. Key topics include idea protection, team formation, and seed funds. Guest speakers who are involved in the startup process or are successful entrepreneurs present. Under faculty supervision, students work on case studies in areas such as renewable energy, sustainable design, food security, climate change, new infrastructures, and transportation. Concludes with the writing of a SBIR/STTR-type grant or business model. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
B. Marelli

1.005 Experiential Sustainability
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 1-0-2
______
Examines the frameworks, governance, science, and social science of sustainability around students' summer internships, research, and other experiential learning activities. During the summer (virtually) and through the first four weeks of the fall term, students engage in small group discussions on diverse topics in sustainability, from environmental justice to corporate social responsibility. Includes global climate action negotiation simulation activities, roundtables with experts in sustainability, and/or similar opportunities for interaction with broad topics in sustainability. In the fall, students reflect on their engagement with sustainability during their summer experience, culminating in a showcase of final presentations. Students planning to take this subject must apply in the spring; consult the program website for details.
D. Plata

1.006 Tools for Sustainable Design
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Conveys the principles, tools, and practice of environmentally sustainable design. Augments understanding of societal limitations to implementation of sustainable solutions, such that they may be strategically navigated. Presents the arguments and historical motivation for early evaluation of environmental impact metrics; illustrates and utilizes modern, rigorous tools for environmental optimization; and highlights national and global experts drawn from non-governmental organizations (NGOs), government, industry, and academia. Provides an overview of the principles of Green Chemistry and Engineering, Life Cycle Analysis, toxicity prediction, and basic chemical and materials flows knowledge.
D. Plata

1.008 Engineering for a Sustainable World
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 1-1-1 [P/D/F]
______
Introduces engineering principles for sustainable development of infrastructure, environmental, and societal systems. Faculty members discuss case studies that highlight challenges and opportunities in the areas of smart cities, cyber-physical systems (transportation, electricity, and societal networks), sustainable resource management (land, water, and energy), and resilient design under the changing environment. Instruction covers the use of computation and data analytics for generating insights, and exercises designed to promote systems thinking and problem-solving skills. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first-year students.
S. Amin

1.009 Climate Change
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 1-0-2 [P/D/F]
______
Provides an introduction to global climate change processes, drivers, and impacts. Offers exposure to exciting MIT research on climate change. Students explore why and how the world should solve this global problem and how they can contribute to the solutions. Students produce a mini-project on the topic. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first year students.
E. Eltahir

1.010 Probability and Causal Inference
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Calculus II (GIR)
Units: 5-0-7
______
Introduces probability and causal inference with an emphasis on understanding, quantifying, and modeling uncertainty and cause-effect relationships in an engineering context. Topics in the first half include events and their probability, the total probability and Bayes' theorems, discrete and continuous random variables and vectors, and conditional analysis. Topics in the second half include covariance, correlation, regression analysis, causality analysis, structural causal models, interventions, and hypothesis testing. Concepts illustrated through data and applications. credit cannot also be received for 1.010A or 1.010B.
S. Saavedra

1.010A Probability: Concepts and Applications
(New)
______

Undergrad (Fall); first half of term
Prereq: Calculus II (GIR)
Units: 2-0-4
______
Introduces probability with an emphasis on probabilistic systems analysis. Readings about conceptual and mathematical background are given in advanced of each class. Classes revise background and are centered on developing problem-solving skills. The course is exam-based and focused on the analysis of probabilistic outcomes, estimating what can happen under uncertain environments. Topics include random events and their probability, combinatorial analysis, conditional analysis, random vectors, functions of random vectors, propagation of uncertainty, and prediction analysis. Credit cannot also be received for 1.010.
S. Saavedra

1.010B Causal Inference for Data Analysis
(New)
______

Undergrad (Fall); second half of term
Prereq: 1.010A or permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
______
Introduces causal inference with an emphasis on probabilistic systems analysis. Readings about conceptual and mathematical background are given in advanced of each class. Class is focused on understanding theory based on real-world applications. The course is project-based and focused on cause-effect relationships, understanding why probabilistic outcomes happen. Topics include correlation analysis, Reichenbach's principle, Simpson's paradox, structural causal models and graphs, interventions, do-calculus, average causal effects, dealing with missing information, mediation, and hypothesis testing. Credit cannot also be received for 1.010.
S. Saavedra

1.013 Senior Civil and Environmental Engineering Design
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 1-3-2
Lecture: T2-4 (1-246) Lab: TBA
______
Students engage with faculty around a topic of mutual interest, building on the knowledge/skills gained throughout their program. Synthesizes prior coursework and experiences through a semester-long design project and related assignments. Students form teams and work on projects advised by faculty representatives from each core in the 1-ENG curriculum. Teams demonstrate creativity in applying theories and methodologies while considering their project's technical, environmental and social feasibility. Includes lectures on a variety of related engineering concepts, as well as scholarship and engineering practice and ethics. Provides instruction and practice in oral and written communication.
Fall: B. Marelli, O. Cordero
Spring: B. Marelli, O. Cordero
No required or recommended textbooks

1.015[J] Design of Electromechanical Robotic Systems
______

Undergrad (Spring) Partial Lab
(Same subject as 2.017[J])
Prereq: 2.003, 2.016, and 2.678; Coreq: 2.671
Units: 3-3-6
Lecture: TR11-12.30 (1-134) Lab: W2-5 (NW98-100)
______
Design, construction, and testing of field robotic systems, through team projects with each student responsible for a specific subsystem. Projects focus on electronics, instrumentation, and machine elements. Design for operation in uncertain conditions is a focus point, with ocean waves and marine structures as a central theme. Basic statistics, linear systems, Fourier transforms, random processes, spectra and extreme events with applications in design. Lectures on ethics in engineering practice included. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication provided. Satisfies 6 units of Institute Laboratory credit. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity.
M. Triantafyllou, T. Consi
No required or recommended textbooks

1.016[J] Design for Complex Environmental Issues
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Same subject as 2.00C[J], EC.746[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-1-5
Lecture: MW3-4.30 (4-409) Recitation: F3 (4-409)
______
Working in small teams with real clients, students develop solutions related to the year's Terrascope topic. They have significant autonomy as they follow a full engineering design cycle from client profile through increasingly sophisticated prototypes to final product. Provides opportunities to acquire skills with power tools, workshop practice, design, product testing, and teamwork. Focuses on sustainability and appropriate technology that matches the client's specific situation and constraints. Products are exhibited in the public Bazaar of Ideas and evaluated by an expert panel. Class taught in collaboration with D-Lab and Beaver Works. Limited to first-year students. Open to students outside of Terrascope.
A. W. Epstein, S. L. Hsu, J. Grimm
No required or recommended textbooks

1.018[J] Fundamentals of Ecology
______

Undergrad (Fall) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
(Same subject as 7.30[J], 12.031[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 4-0-8
______
Fundamentals of ecology, considering Earth as an integrated dynamic living system. Coevolution of the biosphere and geosphere, biogeochemical cycles, metabolic diversity, primary productivity, competition and the niche, trophic dynamics and food webs, population growth and limiting factors. Population modeling, global carbon cycle, climate change, geoengineering, theories of resource competition and mutualism, allometric scaling, ecological genomics, niche theory, human population growth. Applied ecology.
D. Des Marais

1.020 Engineering Sustainability: Analysis and Design
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: Physics I (GIR), 18.03, and (1.00 or 1.000)
Units: 3-2-7
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Introduces a systems approach to modeling, analysis, and design of sustainable systems. Covers principles of dynamical systems, network models, optimization, and control, with applications in ecosystems, infrastructure networks, and energy systems. Includes a significant programming component. Students implement and analyze numerical models of systems, and make design decisions to balance physical, environmental, and economic considerations based on real and simulated data.
S. Amin

1.021 Introduction to Modeling and Simulation
______

Undergrad (Spring) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 1.021, 3.021, 10.333, 22.00)
Prereq: 18.03, 3.016B, or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: TR3-4.30 (4-231) Recitation: W3 (24-121)
______
Basic concepts of computer modeling and simulation in science and engineering. Uses techniques and software for simulation, data analysis and visualization. Continuum, mesoscale, atomistic and quantum methods used to study fundamental and applied problems in physics, chemistry, materials science, mechanics, engineering, and biology. Examples drawn from the disciplines above are used to understand or characterize complex structures and materials, and complement experimental observations.
M. Buehler, A. Hoffman
No required or recommended textbooks

1.022 Introduction to Network Models
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: (1.010, 18.03, and (1.00 or 1.000)) or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
______
Provides an introduction to complex networks, their structure, and function, with examples from engineering, applied mathematics and social sciences. Topics include spectral graph theory, notions of centrality, random graph models, contagion phenomena, cascades and diffusion, and opinion dynamics.
A. Ajorlou

1.032 Advanced Soil Mechanics
______

Undergrad (Fall); first half of term
(Subject meets with 1.361)
Prereq: 1.037
Units: 3-0-6
______
Covers topics in the characterization and nature of soils as multi-phase materials; the principle of effective stress; hydraulic conductivity and groundwater seepage; shear strength and stability analyses; stress-deformation properties, consolidation theory and calculation of settlements for clays and sands. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
A. Whittle

1.034[J] Materials in Human Experience
(New)
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as 3.094[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-3-4
Lecture: MW12 (4-237) Lab: M2-5 (4-006) or W2-5 (4-006)
______
Examines how people throughout history have selected, evaluated, processed, and utilized natural materials to create objects of material culture. Explores ideological and aesthetic criteria influential in materials development. As examples of ancient engineering and materials processing, topics may include ancient Roman concrete and prehistoric iron and steel production by the Mossi, Haya, and other African cultures. Particular attention paid to the climate issues surrounding iron and cement, and how the examination of ancient technologies can inform our understanding of sustainability in the present and illuminate paths for the future. Previous topics have included Maya use of lime plaster for frescoes, books, and architectural sculpture; the sound, color, and power of metals in Mesoamerica; and metal, cloth, and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. Laboratory sessions provide practical experience with materials discussed in class. Enrollment limited to 24.
M. Tarkanian, A. Masic, J. Hunter
No required or recommended textbooks

1.035 Mechanics of Materials
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 1.050 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-2-7
Lecture: MW11-12.30 (1-273) Lab: T2.30-4.30 (1-050) +final
______
Covers the structure and properties of natural and manufactured engineering materials with an emphasis on the fundamentals of mechanical behavior of materials, while considering their use in civil and environmental engineering design. Topics include linear elasticity, plasticity, viscoelasticity, fracture, and fatigue. Laboratory experiments present principles of experimental characterization techniques, materials selection, and design.
T. Cohen
No required or recommended textbooks

1.036 Structural Mechanics and Design
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: 1.035 and 1.050
Units: 3-1-8
______
Familiarizes students with structural systems, loads, and basis for structural design, including analysis of determinate and indeterminate structures (trusses, beams, frames, cables, and arches). Covers mechanical properties of construction materials, including concrete, steel, and composites. Studies concrete and steel structures through application of principles of structural mechanics. Evaluates behavior and design of reinforced concrete structural elements using limit strength design and serviceability principles. Introduces plastic analysis and design, and load factor design of structural steel members and connections. Team project emphasizes material covered through behavior and problem-based learning.
O. Buyukozturk

1.037 Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Design
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-2-7
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Provides an introduction to soils as engineering materials, including classification and characterization, pore pressures and seepage, principles of effective stress and consolidation, deformation, and shear strength properties. Surveys analysis methods, with a focus on slope stability, limiting earth pressures and bearing capacity, and settlements of foundations. Examines applications in the design of earth dams, earth retaining systems, foundations, and staged construction processes.
A. Whittle

1.041[J] Transportation: Foundations and Methods
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Same subject as IDS.075[J])
(Subject meets with 1.200[J], 11.544[J], IDS.675[J])
Prereq: (1.010 and (1.00 or 1.000)) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-1-8
Lecture: WF2.30-4 (1-135) Lab: M2 (1-150)
______
Covers core analytical and numerical methods for modeling, planning, operations, and control of transportation systems. Traffic flow theory, vehicle dynamics and behavior, numerical integration and simulation, graphical analysis. Properties of delays, queueing theory. Resource allocation, optimization models, linear and integer programming. Autonomy in transport, Markov Decision Processes, reinforcement learning, deep learning. Applications drawn broadly from land, air, and sea transport; private and public sector; transport of passengers and goods; futuristic, modern, and historical. Hands-on computational labs. Linear algebra background is encouraged but not required. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
C. Wu
No required or recommended textbooks

1.050 Solid Mechanics
______

Undergrad (Fall) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
Prereq: Physics I (GIR); Coreq: Calculus II (GIR)
Units: 3-2-7
______
Basic principles of mechanics to describe the behavior of materials, structures and fluids. Dimensional analysis, conservation of momentum, static equilibrium, stress and stress states, hydrostatics, moments and forces. Material and structural strength criteria. Deformation and strain. Conservation of energy in solid mechanics, elasticity and elasticity bounds. Energy dissipation, plasticity and fracture. Open-ended geotechnical and structural engineering studio exercises and experiments with natural and man-made physical systems.
J. Carstensen

1.052 Advancing Mechanics and Materials via Machine Learning
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.121[J], 2.174[J])
Prereq: Calculus II (GIR), Physics II (GIR), and (1.000, 6.100A, 6.100L, or 16.C20)
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR9.30-11 (1-150)
______
Concepts in mechanics (solid mechanics: continuum, micro, meso and molecular mechanics; elasticity, plasticity, fracture and buckling) and machine learning (stochastic optimization, neural networks, convolutional neural nets, adversarial neural nets, graph neural nets, recurrent neural networks and long/short-term memory nets, attention models, variational/autoencoders) introduced and applied to mechanics problems. Covers numerical methods, data and image processing, dataset generation, curation and collection, and experimental validation using additive manufacturing. Modules cover: foundations, fracture mechanics and size effects, molecular mechanics and applications to biomaterials (proteins), forward and inverse problems, mechanics of architected materials, and time dependent mechanical phenomena. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
M. Buehler
No required or recommended textbooks

1.053[J] Dynamics and Control I
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
(Same subject as 2.003[J])
Prereq: Physics II (GIR); Coreq: 2.087 or 18.03
Units: 4-1-7
Lecture: MW9.30-11 (3-270) Recitation: R10 (5-217) or R11 (5-217) or R12 (5-217) or R1 (5-217) or R2 (5-217) +final
______
Introduction to the dynamics and vibrations of lumped-parameter models of mechanical systems. Kinematics. Force-momentum formulation for systems of particles and rigid bodies in planar motion. Work-energy concepts. Virtual displacements and virtual work. Lagrange's equations for systems of particles and rigid bodies in planar motion. Linearization of equations of motion. Linear stability analysis of mechanical systems. Free and forced vibration of linear multi-degree of freedom models of mechanical systems; matrix eigenvalue problems.
Fall: T. Peacock
Spring: T. Peacock, D. Yue
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

1.054 Mechanics and Design of Concrete Structures
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.541)
Prereq: 1.036 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: MW1-2.30 (1-246)
______
Studies strength and deformation of concrete under various states of stress; failure criteria; concrete plasticity; and fracture mechanics concepts. Topics include fundamental behavior of reinforced concrete structural systems and their members; basis for design and code constraints; high-performance concrete materials and their use in innovative design solutions; and yield line theory for slabs. Uses behavior models and nonlinear analysis. Covers complex systems, including bridge structures, concrete shells, and containments. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
O. Buyukozturk
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

1.056[J] Introduction to Structural Design
______

Undergrad (Spring) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
(Same subject as 4.440[J])
(Subject meets with 4.462)
Prereq: Calculus II (GIR)
Units: 3-3-6
Lecture: MW9.30-11 (3-333) Lab: F10-12 (5-233)
______
Introduces the design and behavior of large-scale structures and structural materials. Emphasizes the development of structural form and the principles of structural design. Presents design methods for timber, masonry, concrete and steel applied to long-span roof systems, bridges, and high-rise buildings. Includes environmental assessment of structural systems and materials. In laboratory sessions, students solve structural problems by building and testing simple models. Graduate and undergraduate students have separate lab sections.
J. Ochsendorf
No required or recommended textbooks

1.057 Heritage Science and Technology
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-3-4
______
Interdisciplinary, applied introduction to ancient materials and technology. Students explore materials sustainability and durability from multiple perspectives, using ancient societies, architecture and building materials as time-proven examples of innovation in construction. Involves discussions of peer-reviewed literature and cultural heritage, project formulation, data collection, and data analysis. Culminates in presentation of research project(s), and write-ups of the research in manuscript form.
A. Masic

1.058 Structural Dynamics
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 1.581[J], 2.060[J], 16.221[J])
Prereq: 18.03 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines response of structures to dynamic excitation: free vibration, harmonic loads, pulses and earthquakes. Covers systems of single- and multiple-degree-of-freedom, up to the continuum limit, by exact and approximate methods. Includes applications to buildings, ships, aircraft and offshore structures. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
T. Cohen

1.060 Fluid Mechanics
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: None
Units: 4-2-6
Credit cannot also be received for 1.060A
Lecture: MWF10 (1-132) Lab: T10-12 (1-132) or F2.30-4.30 (1-132) +final
______
Mechanics principles for incompressible fluids. Review of hydrostatics. Conservation of mass, momentum and energy in fluid mechanics. Flow nets, velocity distributions in laminar and turbulent flows, groundwater flows. Momentum and energy principles in hydraulics, with emphasis on open channel flow and hydraulic structures. Drag and lift forces. Analysis of pipe systems, pumps and turbines. Gradually varied flow in open channels, significance of the Froude number, backwater curves and kinematic waves. Application of principles through open-ended studio exercises. Meets with 1.060A first half of term.
B. Marelli
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

1.060A Fluid Mechanics I
______

Undergrad (Spring); first half of term
Prereq: None. Coreq: 18.03; or permission of instructor
Units: 2-1-3
Credit cannot also be received for 1.060
Ends Mar 22. Lecture: MWF10 (1-132) Lab: T10-12 (1-132) or F2.30-4.30 (1-132) +final
______
Mechanics principles for incompressible fluids. Review of hydrostatics. Conservation of mass, momentum and energy in fluid mechanics. Flow nets, velocity distributions in laminar and turbulent flows, groundwater flows. Momentum and energy principles in hydraulics, with emphasis on open channel flow and hydraulic structures. Meets with 1.060 in first half of term.
B. Marelli
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

1.061 Transport Processes in the Environment
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 1.61)
Prereq: 1.060
Units: 3-1-8
Credit cannot also be received for 1.061A
______
Introduction to mass transport in environmental flows, with emphasis on river and lake systems. Covers derivation and solutions to the differential form of mass conservation equations, hydraulic models for environmental systems, residence time distribution, molecular and turbulent diffusion for continuous and point sources, boundary layers, dissolution, bed-water exchange, air-water exchange, and particle transport. Meets with 1.061A first half of term. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
H. Nepf

1.061A Transport Processes in the Environment I
______

Undergrad (Fall); first half of term
Prereq: 1.060A
Units: 2-1-3
Credit cannot also be received for 1.061, 1.61
______
Introduction to mass transport in environmental flows. Covers derivation and solution to the differential form of mass conservation, hydraulic models for environmental systems, residence time distribution, and molecular and turbulent diffusion for continuous and point sources. Meets with 1.061 first half of term.
H. Nepf

1.062[J] Nonlinear Dynamics: Continuum Systems
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Same subject as 12.207[J], 18.354[J])
(Subject meets with 18.3541)
Prereq: Physics II (GIR) and (18.03 or 18.032)
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR9.30-11 (2-135)
______
General mathematical principles of continuum systems. From microscopic to macroscopic descriptions in the form of linear or nonlinear (partial) differential equations. Exact solutions, dimensional analysis, calculus of variations and singular perturbation methods. Stability, waves and pattern formation in continuum systems. Subject matter illustrated using natural fluid and solid systems found, for example, in geophysics and biology.
B. Primkulov
No required or recommended textbooks

1.063 Fluids and Diseases
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.631[J], 2.250[J], HST.537[J])
Prereq: 18.03 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-3-6
Lecture: TR EVE (7-8.30 PM) (1-371)
______
Designed for students in engineering and the quantitative sciences who want to explore applications of mathematics, physics and fluid dynamics to infectious diseases and health; and for students in epidemiology, environmental health, ecology, medicine, and systems modeling seeking to understand physical and spatial modeling, and the role of fluid dynamics and physical constraints on infectious diseases and pathologies. The first part of the class reviews modeling in epidemiology and data collection, and highlights concepts of spatial modeling and heterogeneity. The remainder highlights multi-scale dynamics, the role of fluids and fluid dynamics in physiology, and pathology in a range of infectious diseases. The laboratory portion entails activities aimed at integrating applied learning with theoretical concepts discussed in lectures and covered in problem sets. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
L. Bourouiba
No required or recommended textbooks

1.066[J] Fluid Physics
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Same subject as 8.292[J], 12.330[J])
Prereq: 5.60, 8.044, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR2.30-4 (4-265)
______
A physics-based introduction to the properties of fluids and fluid systems, with examples drawn from a broad range of sciences, including atmospheric physics and astrophysics. Definitions of fluids and the notion of continuum. Equations of state and continuity, hydrostatics and conservation of momentum; ideal fluids and Euler's equation; viscosity and the Navier-Stokes equation. Energy considerations, fluid thermodynamics, and isentropic flow. Compressible versus incompressible and rotational versus irrotational flow; Bernoulli's theorem; steady flow, streamlines and potential flow. Circulation and vorticity. Kelvin's theorem. Boundary layers. Fluid waves and instabilities. Quantum fluids.
L. Bourouiba
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

1.067[J] Energy Systems for Climate Change Mitigation
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 10.421[J], IDS.065[J])
(Subject meets with 1.670[J], 10.621[J], IDS.521[J])
Prereq: (Calculus I (GIR), Chemistry (GIR), and Physics I (GIR)) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Reviews the contributions of energy systems to global greenhouse gas emissions, and the levers for reducing those emissions. Lectures and projects focus on evaluating energy systems against climate policy goals, using performance metrics such as cost, carbon intensity, and others. Student projects explore pathways for realizing emissions reduction scenarios. Projects address the climate change mitigation potential of energy technologies (hardware and software), technological and behavioral change trajectories, and technology and policy portfolios. Background in energy systems strongly recommended. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments and explore the subject in greater depth. Preference to students in the Energy Studies or Environment and Sustainability minors.
J. Trancik

1.068 Nonlinear Dynamics and Turbulence
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.686[J], 2.033[J], 18.358[J])
Prereq: 1.060A
Units: 3-2-7
______
Reviews theoretical notions of nonlinear dynamics, instabilities, and waves with applications in fluid dynamics. Discusses hydrodynamic instabilities leading to flow destabilization and transition to turbulence. Focuses on physical turbulence and mixing from homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Also covers topics such as rotating and stratified flows as they arise in the environment, wave-turbulence, and point source turbulent flows. Laboratory activities integrate theoretical concepts covered in lectures and problem sets. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
L. Bourouiba

1.070A[J] Introduction to Hydrology and Water Resources
______

Undergrad (Fall); first half of term
(Same subject as 12.320A[J])
Prereq: 1.060A; Coreq: 1.061A and 1.106
Units: 2-0-4
______
Water in the environment; Water resource systems; The hydrologic cycle at its role in the climate system; Surface water and energy balance; evaporation and transpiration through vegetation; Precipitation formation, infiltration, storm runoff, and flood processes; Groundwater aquifers, subsurface flow and the hydraulics of wells.
D. Entekhabi

1.070B[J] Introduction to Hydrology Modeling
______

Undergrad (Fall); second half of term
(Same subject as 12.320B[J])
Prereq: 1.070A
Units: 2-0-4
______
Develops understanding of numerical modeling of aquifers, groundwater flow and contaminant transport, as well as uncertainty and risk analysis for water resources.
D. Entekhabi

1.071[J] Global Change Science
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 12.300[J])
(Subject meets with 1.771)
Prereq: 18.03
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces the basic principles and concepts in atmospheric physics, and climate dynamics, through an examination of: greenhouse gases emissions (mainly CO2), global warming, and regional climate change. Case studies are presented for the regional impacts of climate change on extreme weather, water availability, and disease transmission. Introduction to regional and global environmental problems for students in basic sciences and engineering. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
E. Eltahir

1.072 Groundwater Hydrology
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.72)
Prereq: 1.061
Units: 3-1-8
Lecture: MW10.30-12 (48-308)
______
Presents the fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. Topics include Darcy equation, flow nets, mass conservation, the aquifer flow equation, heterogeneity and anisotropy, storage properties, regional circulation, unsaturated flow, recharge, stream-aquifer interaction, well hydraulics, flow through fractured rock, numerical models, groundwater quality, contaminant transport processes, dispersion, decay, and adsorption. Includes laboratory and computer demonstrations. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
C. Harvey
No required or recommended textbooks

1.073 Introduction to Environmental Data Analysis
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: 1.010
Units: 2-0-4
______
Covers theory and practical methods for the analysis of univariate data sets. Topics include basics of statistical inference, analysis of trends and stationarity; Gaussian stochastic processes, covariance and correlation analysis, and introduction to spectral analysis. Students analyze data collected from the civil, environment, and systems domains.
E. Eltahir

1.074 Multivariate Data Analysis
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: 1.010
Units: 2-0-4
______
Introduction to statistical multivariate analysis methods and their applications to analyze data and mathematical models. Topics include sampling, experimental design, regression analysis, specification testing, dimension reduction, categorical data analysis, classification and clustering.
S. Amin

1.075 Water Resource Systems
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 1.731)
Prereq: 1.070B or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Surveys optimization and simulation methods for management of water resources. Case studies illustrate linear, quadratic, nonlinear programming and real-time control. Applications include river basin planning, irrigation and agriculture, reservoir operations, capacity expansion, assimilation of remote sensing data, and sustainable resource development. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
D. McLaughlin

1.076 Carbon Management
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.760)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-2-7
______
Introduces the carbon cycle and "climate solutions." Provides specialized knowledge to manage and offset carbon emissions for government entities and large corporations through nature-based solutions and technology. Students prepare a mini-project simulating the assessment of practices and technologies for removing carbon dioxide from the air for a specific organization, which prepares them to become professionals with the skills to help evaluate and manage carbon emissions. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
C. Terrer

1.077 Land, Water, Food, and Climate
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 1.74)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
______
Examines land, water, food, and climate in a changing world, with an emphasis on key scientific questions about the connections between natural resources and food production. Students read and discuss papers on a range of topics, including water and land resources, climate change, demography, agroecology, biotechnology, trade, and food security. Supporting information used for background and context includes data and analysis based on government reports, textbooks, and longer peer-reviewed documents not included in the readings. Provides a broad perspective on one of the defining global issues of this century. Students carry out exercises with relevant data sets, write critiques of key issues, and complete a focused term project. Completion of MIT Science Core or equivalent recommended but not required. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
D. McLaughlin

1.080 Environmental Chemistry
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.800)
Prereq: Chemistry (GIR)
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: MF1-2.30 (48-308)
______
Introduction to environmental chemistry, focusing on the fate of chemicals in both natural and engineered systems. Covers equilibrium reactions (e.g., partitioning, dissolution/precipitation, acid-base, redox, metal complexation), and kinetically-controlled reactions (e.g., photolysis, free radical oxidation). Specific environmental topics covered include heavy metals in natural waters, drinking water, and soils; biogeochemical cycles; radioactivity in the environment; smog formation; greenhouse gases and climate change; and engineering for the prevention and remediation of pollution. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.
J. Kroll
No required or recommended textbooks

1.081[J] Environmental Cancer Risks, Prevention, and Therapy
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Same subject as 20.104[J])
Prereq: Biology (GIR), Calculus II (GIR), and Chemistry (GIR)
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR1-2.30 (16-771)
______
Analysis of the history of cancer and vascular disease mortality rates in predominantly European- and African-American US cohorts, 1895-2016, to discover specific historical shifts. Explored in terms of contemporaneously changing environmental risk factors: air-, food- and water-borne chemicals; subclinical infections; diet and lifestyles. Special section on occupational risk factors. Considers the hypotheses that genetic and/or environmental factors affect metakaryotic stem cell mutation rates in fetuses and juveniles and/or their growth rates of preneoplastic in adults.
W. Thilly, R. McCunney
No required or recommended textbooks

1.082 Ethics for Engineers
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring)
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 1.082, 2.900, 6.9320, 10.01, 16.676, 22.014)
(Subject meets with 6.9321, 20.005)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4
URL: https://e4e.mit.edu/
Lecture: M3-5 (66-148) or T3-5 (66-148) or W3-5 (66-148) or W EVE (7-9 PM) (66-148)
______
Explores how to be an ethical engineer. Students examine engineering case studies along with foundational ethical readings, and investigate which ethical approaches are best and how to apply them as engineers. Topics include justice, rights, cost-benefit analysis, safety, bias, genetic engineering, climate change, and the promise and peril of AI. Discussion-based. All sections cover the same core ethical frameworks, but some sections have a particular focus for engineering case studies, such as Computer Science or Bioengineering. Students are eligible to take any section of the course, regardless of their registered course number. The subject is taught in separate sections. For 20.005, students additionally undertake an ethical-technical analysis of a BE-related topic of their choosing.
Fall: B. L. Trout, P. Hansen, D. Lauffenburger, K. Hansen
Spring: P. Hansen, M. Hemann, D. Lauffenburger, K. Hansen
No required or recommended textbooks

1.084[J] Applied Microbiology
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 20.106[J])
Prereq: Biology (GIR) and Chemistry (GIR)
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introductory microbiology from a systems perspective - considers microbial diversity and the integration of data from a molecular, cellular, organismal, and ecological context to understand the interaction of microbial organisms with their environment. Special emphasis on specific viral, bacterial, and eukaryotic microorganisms and their interaction with animal hosts with focus on contemporary problems in areas such as vaccination, emerging disease, antimicrobial drug resistance, and toxicology.
J. Niles, K. Ribbeck

1.085[J] Air Pollution and Atmospheric Chemistry
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 12.336[J])
(Subject meets with 1.855)
Prereq: 18.03
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides a working knowledge of basic air quality issues, with emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach to investigating the sources and effects of pollution. Topics include emission sources; atmospheric chemistry and removal processes; meteorological phenomena and their impact on pollution transport at local to global scales; air pollution control technologies; health effects; and regulatory standards. Discusses regional and global issues, such as acid rain, ozone depletion and air quality connections to climate change. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Recommended for upper-level undergraduate students.
C. Heald

1.086 Physics of Renewable Energy Systems and Computational Analysis
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.861)
Prereq: (Physics I (GIR), Physics II (GIR), and 18.03) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR3-4.30 (48-316)
______
Introduction to renewable energy generation in the context of the energy grid system. Focuses on computational analysis and modeling of energy systems. Topics include the energy grid and energy markets; fossil fuel generation; wind, solar, hydroelectric, and ocean energy; and energy storage. Tools, including computational models of wind energy generation and energy forecasting algorithms, introduced. Final project focuses on the development of low-carbon, low-cost energy systems. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
M. Howland
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

1.088 Genomics and Evolution of Infectious Disease
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.881[J], HST.538[J])
Prereq: Biology (GIR) and (1.000 or 6.100B)
Units: 3-0-9
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Provides a thorough introduction to the forces driving infectious disease evolution, practical experience with bioinformatics and computational tools, and discussions of current topics relevant to public health. Topics include mechanisms of genome variation in bacteria and viruses, population genetics, outbreak detection and tracking, strategies to impede the evolution of drug resistance, emergence of new disease, and microbiomes and metagenomics. Discusses primary literature and computational assignments. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
T. Lieberman

1.089 Environmental Microbial Biogeochemistry
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.89)
Prereq: Biology (GIR)
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR1.30-3 (48-316)
______
Provides a thorough introduction to biogeochemical cycling from the vantage point of microbial physiology. Emphasizes molecular mechanisms, experimental design and methodology, hypothesis testing, and applications. Topics include aerobic and anaerobic respiration, trace metals, secondary metabolites, redox, plant-microbe interactions, carbon storage, agriculture, and bioengineering. Formal lectures and in-depth discussions of foundational and contemporary primary literature. Students use knowledge of microbial metabolisms to develop final projects on applied solutions to problems in agriculture and biogeochemistry. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
D. McRose
No required or recommended textbooks

1.091 Traveling Research Environmental eXperience (TREX): Fieldwork
______

Undergrad (IAP)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 1-2-0
______
Introduction to environmental fieldwork and research, with a focus on data collection and analysis. Subject spans three weeks, including two weeks of fieldwork, and involves one or more projects central to environmental science and engineering. Location varies year-to-year, though recent projects have focused on the island of Hawaii. Limited to Course 1 students.
D. Des Marais
No required or recommended textbooks

1.096[J] Design of Sustainable Polymer Systems
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 10.496[J])
Prereq: (10.213 and 10.301) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Capstone subject in which students are charged with redesigning consumable plastics to improve their recyclability and illustrate the potential future of plastic sourcing and management. Students engage with industry partners and waste handlers to delineate the design space and understand downstream limitations in waste treatment. Instruction includes principles of plastic design, polymer selection, cost estimation, prototyping, and the principles of sustainable material design. Students plan and propose routes to make enhanced plastic kits. Industry partners and course instructors select winning designs. Those students can elect to proceed to a semester of independent study in which prototype kits are fabricated (using polymer extrusion, cutting, 3D printing), potentially winning seed funds to translate ideas into real impacts. Preference to juniors and seniors in Courses 10, 1, and 2.
Staff

1.097 Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering Research
______

Undergrad (IAP)
Prereq: None
Units: 1-5-0 [P/D/F]
______
Students work one-on-one with a CEE graduate student or postdoc mentor on a project that aligns with their research interests. Previous project topics include transportation networks, structural mechanics, sediment transport, climate science, and microbial ecology. Includes weekly seminar-style talks. Intended for first-year students.
S. Smith
No required or recommended textbooks

Undergraduate Laboratory Subjects

1.101 Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering Design I
______

Undergrad (Fall) Partial Lab
Prereq: None
Units: 0-4-2
______
Introduces the creative design process in the context of civil and environmental engineering. Emphasizes the idea-to-product trajectory: identification of a design question/problem, evaluation of requirements/constraints set by the application and/or client, and implementation into a concrete product deliverable. Fosters active learning through open-ended, student-driven projects in which teams apply the design process to a design/planning problem. In labs, students design and build a working model or an experiment that addresses a specific engineering aspect of their project. In addition to written and oral presentations, students start a web-based portfolio. Satisfies 6 units of Institute Laboratory credit. Enrollment limited; preference to Course 1 majors and minors.
T. Cohen

1.102 Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering Design II
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring) Partial Lab
Prereq: 1.101 and (Physics II (GIR) or Coreq: 1.060)
Units: 1-3-2
______
Project-oriented subject focused on the principles and practice of engineering design. Emphasis on construction and deployment of designs, plus performance testing used to determine if designs behave as expected. Includes a major team project involving use and application of sensors, as well as environmentally-friendly, and energy-effective or energy-producing designs. Develops practical, teamwork and communication skills. Satisfies 6 units of Institute Laboratory credit. Enrollment limited; preference to Course 1 majors and minors.
A. Masic

1.103[J] Infrastructure Design for Climate Change
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 11.173[J])
(Subject meets with 1.303[J], 11.273[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 0-2-4
______
In this team-oriented, project-based subject, students work to find technical solutions that could be implemented to mitigate the effects of natural hazards related to climate change, bearing in mind that any proposed measures must be appropriate in a given region's socio-political-economic context. Students are introduced to a variety of natural hazards and possible mitigation approaches as well as principles of design, including adaptable design and design for failure. Students select the problems they want to solve and develop their projects. During the term, officials and practicing engineers of Cambridge, Boston, Puerto Rico, and MIT Facilities describe their approaches. Student projects are documented in a written report and oral presentation. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment limited; preference to juniors and seniors.
H. Einstein

1.104 Sensing and Intelligent Systems
(New)
______

Undergrad (Spring) Partial Lab
Prereq: (1.000 or 6.100A) and (1.101 or permission of instructor)
Units: 1-3-2
Lecture: T9.30 (1-134) Lab: R1-4 (1-050)
______
Introduces concepts and tools for modern sensing, data acquisition, and post-processing techniques, with applications to monitoring and control of infrastructure and environmental systems. Provides technical knowledge of sensing and monitoring technologies. Students collaborate to develop a design project that involves: selecting the right kind of sensors guided by the physical principles and sensing modalities; synthesizing multi-modal data for new applications; refining commercially available sensors for new real-world applications; designing a sensor network and building data-acquisition system for use in lab experiments and/or real-world deployments; sending the data over the Internet for visualization and post-processing; and using intuition and mathematical models to analyze the data. Guided visits to faculty research labs and field visits provide perspective. Provides instruction in oral and written communication.
S. Amin
No required or recommended textbooks

1.106 Environmental Fluid Transport Processes and Hydrology Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Fall) Partial Lab
Prereq: None. Coreq: 1.061A
Units: 0-4-2
______
Fundamentals of mass transport and flow measurement in environmental systems. Topics include analysis of measurement uncertainty, diffusion, dispersion, air-water exchange, dissolution, and porous media flow. Develops communication skills through the writing and revision of formal lab reports and short oral presentations. Satisfies 6 units of Institute Laboratory credit. Enrollment limited; preference to 1-ENG majors.
H. Nepf

1.107 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Spring) Partial Lab
Prereq: None. Coreq: 1.080
Units: 0-4-2
Lecture: R1 (48-308) Lab: R2-5 (48-109)
______
Laboratory and field techniques in environmental engineering and its application to the understanding of natural and engineered ecosystems. Exercises involve data collection and analysis covering a range of topics, spanning all major domains of the environment (air, water, soils, and sediments), and using a number of modern environmental analytical techniques. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication provided. Concludes with a student-designed final project, which is written up in the form of a scientific manuscript. Satisfies 6 units of Institute Laboratory credit. Enrollment limited; preference to 1-ENG.
D. Plata
No required or recommended textbooks

1.108 Climate and Sustainability Lab
(New)
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring) Institute Lab
Prereq: 12.003 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-4-5
______
Students work together on a project addressing climate mitigation and/or adaptation. The topic of the project changes from year to year but builds on the knowledge and skills gained in previous coursework in climate science and engineering. Students are challenged to demonstrate creativity in applying theories and methodologies while considering their project's technical, social, and theoretical feasibility. Includes lectures on related climate-change scientific and engineering concepts. Provides instruction and practice in oral and written communication.
C. Harvey

Engineering Information Systems and Computation

1.121[J] Advancing Mechanics and Materials via Machine Learning
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 2.174[J])
(Subject meets with 1.052)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR9.30-11 (1-150)
______
Concepts in mechanics (solid mechanics: continuum, micro, meso, and molecular mechanics; elasticity, plasticity, fracture and buckling) and machine learning (stochastic optimization, neural networks, convolutional neural nets, adversarial neural nets, graph neural nets, recurrent neural networks and long/short-term memory nets, attention models, variational/autoencoders) introduced and applied to mechanics problems. Covers numerical methods, data and image processing, dataset generation, curation and collection, and experimental validation using additive manufacturing. Modules cover: foundations, fracture mechanics and size effects, molecular mechanics and applications to biomaterials (proteins), forward and inverse problems, mechanics of architected materials, and time dependent mechanical phenomena. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
M. Buehler
No required or recommended textbooks

1.125 Architecting and Engineering Software Systems
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Software architecting and design of cloud-based software-intensive systems. Targeted at future engineering managers who must understand both the business and technical issues involved in architecting enterprise-scale systems. Student teams confront technically challenging problems. Introduces modern dev-ops concepts and cloud-computing, including cloud orchestration for machine learning. Also discusses cyber-security issues of key management and use of encrypted messaging for distributed ledgers, e.g., blockchain. Students face problem solving in an active learning lab setting, completing in-class exercises and weekly assignments leading to a group project. Some programming experience preferred. Enrollment limited.
J. Williams

1.127[J] Reinforcement Learning: Foundations and Methods
(New)
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 6.7920[J], IDS.140[J])
Prereq: 6.3700 or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
______
Examines reinforcement learning (RL) as a methodology for approximately solving sequential decision-making under uncertainty, with foundations in optimal control and machine learning. Provides a mathematical introduction to RL, including dynamic programming, statistical, and empirical perspectives, and special topics. Core topics include: dynamic programming, special structures, finite and infinite horizon Markov Decision Processes, value and policy iteration, Monte Carlo methods, temporal differences, Q-learning, stochastic approximation, and bandits. Also covers approximate dynamic programming, including value-based methods and policy space methods. Applications and examples drawn from diverse domains. Focus is mathematical, but is supplemented with computational exercises. An analysis prerequisite is suggested but not required; mathematical maturity is necessary.
C. Wu

Engineering Analysis Methods

1.138[J] Wave Propagation
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 2.062[J], 18.376[J])
Prereq: 2.003 and 18.075
Units: 3-0-9
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Theoretical concepts and analysis of wave problems in science and engineering with examples chosen from elasticity, acoustics, geophysics, hydrodynamics, blood flow, nondestructive evaluation, and other applications. Progressive waves, group velocity and dispersion, energy density and transport. Reflection, refraction and transmission of plane waves by an interface. Mode conversion in elastic waves. Rayleigh waves. Waves due to a moving load. Scattering by a two-dimensional obstacle. Reciprocity theorems. Parabolic approximation. Waves on the sea surface. Capillary-gravity waves. Wave resistance. Radiation of surface waves. Internal waves in stratified fluids. Waves in rotating media. Waves in random media.
T. R. Akylas, R. R. Rosales

See also 1.351, 1.541, 1.56J, 1.63, 1.691.

Engineering Systems, Economics, and Optimization

1.142[J] Robust Modeling, Optimization, and Computation
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 15.094[J])
Prereq: 18.06 or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: MW4-5.30 (E51-315) Recitation: F9 (E51-325) +final
______
Introduces modern robust optimization, including theory, applications, and computation. Presents formulations and their connection to probability, information and risk theory for conic optimization (linear, second-order, and semidefinite cones) and integer optimization. Application domains include analysis and optimization of stochastic networks, optimal mechanism design, network information theory, transportation, pattern classification, structural and engineering design, and financial engineering. Students formulate and solve a problem aligned with their interests in a final project.
D. Bertsimas
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

1.146 Engineering Systems Analysis for Design
______

Graduate (Fall)
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 1.146, 16.861, EM.422, IDS.332)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Credit cannot also be received for EM.423, IDS.333
______
Practical-oriented subject that builds upon theory and methods and culminates in extended application. Covers methods to identify, value, and implement flexibility in design (real options). Topics include definition of uncertainties, simulation of performance for scenarios, screening models to identify desirable flexibility, decision analysis, and multidimensional economic evaluation. Students demonstrate proficiency through an extended application to a system design of their choice. Complements research or thesis projects. Class is "flipped" to maximize student engagement and learning. Meets with IDS.333 in the first half of term. Enrollment limited.
R. de Neufville

1.147 Startup Sustainable Tech
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.004)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides a practical introduction to key innovations in the fields of civil and environmental engineering that are currently having an impact. Structured around the different aspects of starting and maintaining a company in the first years after incorporation. Key topics include idea protection, team formation, and seed funds. Guest speakers who are involved in the startup process or are successful entrepreneurs present. Under faculty supervision, students work on case studies in areas such as renewable energy, sustainable design, food security, climate change, new infrastructures, and transportation. Concludes with the writing of a SBIR/STTR-type grant or business model. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
B. Marelli

See also 1.202J, 1.203J, 1.283J, 1.731. For management of engineering systems, see also 1.040, 1.401J-1.482.


left arrow | 1.00-1.149 | 1.150-1.499 | 1.50-1.999 plus UROP and Thesis | right arrow



Produced: 18-APR-2024 05:10 PM