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Course 16: Aeronautics and Astronautics
IAP/Spring 2024


16.621 Experimental Projects I
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None. Coreq: 16.06 or 16.07
Units: 2-1-3
______
First in a two-term sequence that addresses the conception and design of a student-defined or selected experimental research project carried out by two-person team under faculty advisement. Principles of research hypothesis formulation and assessment, experimental measurements and error analysis, and effective report writing and oral presentation, with instruction both in-class and on an individual and team basis. Selection and detailed planning of a research project, including in-depth design of experimental procedure that is then carried through to completion in 16.622.
Staff

16.622 Experimental Projects II
______

Undergrad (Spring) Institute Lab
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 16.621
Units: 1-7-4
______
Execution of research project experiments based on the plan developed in 16.621. Working with their faculty advisor and course staff, student teams construct their experiment, carry out measurements of the relevant phenomena, analyze the data, and then apply the results to assess the research hypothesis. Includes instruction on effective report writing and oral presentations culminating in a written final report and formal oral presentation.
Staff

16.63[J] System Safety
______

Undergrad (Fall) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as IDS.045[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces the concepts of system safety and how to analyze and design safer systems. Topics include the causes of accidents in general, and recent major accidents in particular; hazard analysis, safety-driven design techniques; design of human-automation interaction; integrating safety into the system engineering process; and managing and operating safety-critical systems.
N. Leveson

16.632 Introduction to Autonomous Machines
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP)
Prereq: None. Coreq: 2.086 or 6.100A
Units: 2-2-2
______
Experiential seminar provides an introduction to the fundamental aspects of robust autonomous machines that includes an overall systems/component-level overview. Projects involve hands-on investigations with a variety of sensors and completely functioning, small-scale autonomous machines utilized for in-class implementation/testing of control algorithms. Students should have concurrent or prior programming experience. Preference to students in the NEET Autonomous Machines thread.
Fall: G. Long
IAP: G. Long
No required or recommended textbooks

16.633 NEET Junior Seminar: Autonomous Machines
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 1-1-1
______
Project-based seminar provides instruction on how to program basic autonomy algorithms for a micro aerial vehicle equipped with a camera. Begins by introducing the constituent hardware and components of a quadrotor drone. As this subject progresses, the students practice using simple signal processing, state estimation, control, and computer vision algorithms for mobile robotics. Students program the micro aerial vehicle to compete in a variety of challenges. Limited to students in the NEET Autonomous Machines thread.
G. Long, J. How

16.634 NEET Senior Seminar: Autonomous Machines
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 1-1-1
______
Provides a foundation for students taking 16.84 as part of the NEET Autonomous Machines thread. Through a set of focused activities, students determine the autonomous system they will design, which includes outlining the materials, facilities, and resources they need to create the system. Limited to students in the NEET Autonomous Machines thread or with instructor's permission.
G. Long

16.64 Flight Measurement Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 16.002
Units: 2-2-2
TBA.
______
Opportunity to see aeronautical theory applied in real-world environment of flight. Students assist in design and execution of simple engineering flight experiments in light aircraft. Typical investigations include determination of stability derivatives, verification of performance specifications, and measurement of navigation system characteristics. Restricted to students in Aeronautics and Astronautics.
R. J. Hansman
No textbook information available

16.645[J] Dimensions of Geoengineering
______

Graduate (Fall); first half of term
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 1.850[J], 5.000[J], 10.600[J], 11.388[J], 12.884[J], 15.036[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4
______
Familiarizes students with the potential contributions and risks of using geoengineering technologies to control climate damage from global warming caused by greenhouse gas emissions. Discusses geoengineering in relation to other climate change responses: reducing emissions, removing CO2 from the atmosphere, and adapting to the impacts of climate change. Limited to 100.
J. Deutch, M. Zuber

16.650 Engineering Leadership Lab
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 6.9110, 16.650)
(Subject meets with 6.9130[J], 16.667[J])
Prereq: None. Coreq: 6.9120; or permission of instructor
Units: 0-2-1
Lab: F9-11 (32-144) or F1-3 (32-144) or F3-5 (32-144)
______
Develops leadership, teamwork and communication skills by exposing students to leadership frameworks, models, and cases within an engineering context in an interactive, practice-based environment. Students are members of and lead teams, participate in guided reflections on individual and team successes, and discover opportunities for improvement in controlled settings. Experiential learning includes design-implement activities, role-play simulations, small group discussions, and performance and peer assessments by and of other students. Includes frequent engineering industry-guest participation. Content is frequently student-driven. First year Gordon Engineering Leadership Program (GEL) students register for 6.9110. Second year GEL Program students register for 6.9130. Preference to students enrolled in the Bernard M. Gordon-MIT Engineering Leadership Program.
Fall: L. McGonagle, J. Feiler
Spring: L. Mcgonagle
No required or recommended textbooks

16.651 Engineering Leadership
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 6.9120, 16.651)
Prereq: None. Coreq: 6.9110; or permission of instructor
Units: 1-0-2
Lecture: M11-12.30 (4-153) or M1-2.30 (4-153) or T11-12.30 (4-153) or T1-2.30 (4-153)
______
Exposes students to the models and methods of engineering leadership within the contexts of conceiving, designing, implementing and operating products, processes and systems. Introduces the Capabilities of Effective Engineering Leaders, and models and theories related to the capabilities. Discusses the appropriate times and reasons to use particular models to deliver engineering success. Includes occasional guest speakers or panel discussions. May be repeated for credit once with permission of instructor. Preference to first-year students in the Gordon Engineering Leadership Program.
Fall: J. Magarian, E. Schanne
Spring: J. Magarian, E. Schanne
No required or recommended textbooks

16.653 Management in Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 2.96, 6.9360, 10.806, 16.653)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-1-8
______
Introduction and overview of engineering management. Financial principles, management of innovation, technical strategy and best management practices. Case study method of instruction emphasizes participation in class discussion. Focus is on the development of individual skills and management tools. Restricted to juniors and seniors.
J-H Chun, A. Weiss

16.66 MATLAB Skills for Aeronautics and Astronautics
______

Undergrad (Fall); first half of term
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 1-0-2 [P/D/F]
______
Introduction to basic MATLAB skills in programming, analysis, and plotting. Recommended for sophomores without previous MATLAB experience. Preference to Course 16 majors.
Staff

16.6621[J] Introduction to Design Thinking and Innovation in Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring); first half of term
(Same subject as 2.7231[J], 6.9101[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-1 [P/D/F]
Ends Mar 22. Lecture: M EVE (7-9 PM) (32-124)
______
Introduces students to concepts of design thinking and innovation that can be applied to any engineering discipline. Focuses on introducing an iterative design process, a systems-thinking approach for stakeholder analysis, methods for articulating design concepts, methods for concept selection, and techniques for testing with users. Provides an opportunity for first-year students to explore product or system design and development, and to build their understanding of what it means to lead and coordinate projects in engineering design. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first-year students. Enrollment limited to 25; priority to first-year students.
Fall: C. Kotelly
Spring: C. Kotelly
No textbook information available

16.662A Design Thinking and Innovation Leadership for Engineers
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring); first half of term
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 2.723A, 6.910A, 16.662A)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-1
Ends Mar 22. Lecture: M EVE (7-9 PM) (32-141) Design: M EVE (9 PM) (32-141)
______
Introductory subject in design thinking and innovation. Develops students' ability to conceive, implement, and evaluate successful projects in any engineering discipline. Lessons focus on an iterative design process, a systems-thinking approach for stakeholder analysis, methods for articulating design concepts, methods for concept selection, and techniques for testing with users.
Fall: B. Kotelly
Spring: B. Kotelly
No textbook information available

16.662B Design Thinking and Innovation Project
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring); second half of term
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 2.723B, 6.910B, 16.662B)
Prereq: 6.910A
Units: 2-0-1
Begins Apr 1. Lecture: M EVE (7-9 PM) (32-141) Design: M EVE (9 PM) (32-141)
______
Project-based subject. Students employ design-thinking techniques learned in 6.902A to develop a robust speech-recognition application using a web-based platform. Students practice in leadership and teamwork skills as they collaboratively conceive, implement, and iteratively refine their designs based on user feedback. Topics covered include techniques for leading the creative process in teams, the ethics of engineering systems, methods for articulating designs with group collaboration, identifying and reconciling paradoxes of engineering designs, and communicating solution concepts with impact. Students present oral presentations and receive feedback to sharpen their communication skills.
Fall: B. Kotelly
Spring: C. Kotelly
No textbook information available

16.667 Engineering Leadership Lab
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 6.9130, 16.667)
(Subject meets with 6.9110[J], 16.650[J])
Prereq: 6.910A, 6.9110, 6.9120, or permission of instructor
Units: 0-2-4
Lab: F9-11 (32-144) or F1-3 (32-144) or F3-5 (32-144)
______
Advances students' leadership, teamwork and communication skills through further exposure to leadership frameworks, models, and cases within an engineering context in an interactive, practice-based environment. Students coach others, assess performance, and lead guided reflections on individual and team successes, while discovering opportunities for improvement. Students assist with programmatic planning and implementation of role-play simulations, small group discussions, and performance and peer assessments by and of other students and by instructors. Includes frequent engineering industry-guest participation and involvement. Content is frequently student-led. Second year Gordon Engineering Leadership Program (GEL) Program students register for 6.913. Preference to students enrolled in the second year of the Gordon-MIT Engineering Leadership Program.
Fall: L. Mcgonagle
Spring: L. Mcgonagle
No required or recommended textbooks

16.669 Project Engineering
______

Undergrad (IAP)
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 6.9140, 16.669)
Prereq: (6.910A and (6.9110 or 6.9120)) or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-0 [P/D/F]
______
Students attend and participate in a four-day off-site workshop covering an introduction to basic principles, methods, and tools for project management in a realistic context. In teams, students create a plan for a project of their choice in one of several areas, including: aircraft modification, factory automation, flood prevention engineering, solar farm engineering, small-business digital transformation/modernization, and disaster response, among others. Develops skills applicable to the planning and management of complex engineering projects. Topics include cost-benefit analysis, resource and cost estimation, and project control and delivery which are practiced during an experiential, team-based activity. Case studies highlight projects in both hardware/software and consumer packaged goods. Preference to students in the Bernard M. Gordon-MIT Engineering Leadership Program.
O. de Weck, J. Feiler, L. McGonagle, R. Rahaman
No textbook information available

16.671[J] Leading Innovation in Teams
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 6.9150[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
______
Empowers future innovators in engineering and technology with a foundation of leadership and teamwork skills. Grounded in research but practical in focus, equips students with leadership competencies such as building self-awareness, motivating and developing others, influencing without authority, managing conflict, and communicating effectively. Teamwork skills include how to convene, launch, and develop various types of teams, including project teams. Reviews recent advances in implementing innovations and building personal capacity for lifelong learning as a leading innovator. Enrollment limited to seating capacity of classroom. Admittance may be controlled by lottery.
D. Nino, J. Schindall

16.676 Ethics for Engineers
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring)
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 1.082, 2.900, 6.9320, 10.01, 16.676, 22.014)
(Subject meets with 6.9321, 20.005)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4
URL: https://e4e.mit.edu/
Lecture: M3-5 (66-148) or T3-5 (66-148) or W3-5 (66-148) or W EVE (7-9 PM) (66-148)
______
Explores how to be an ethical engineer. Students examine engineering case studies along with foundational ethical readings, and investigate which ethical approaches are best and how to apply them as engineers. Topics include justice, rights, cost-benefit analysis, safety, bias, genetic engineering, climate change, and the promise and peril of AI. Discussion-based. All sections cover the same core ethical frameworks, but some sections have a particular focus for engineering case studies, such as Computer Science or Bioengineering. Students are eligible to take any section of the course, regardless of their registered course number. The subject is taught in separate sections. For 20.005, students additionally undertake an ethical-technical analysis of a BE-related topic of their choosing.
Fall: B. L. Trout, P. Hansen, D. Lauffenburger, K. Hansen
Spring: P. Hansen, M. Hemann, D. Lauffenburger, K. Hansen
No required or recommended textbooks

16.680 Project in Aeronautics and Astronautics
______

Undergrad (IAP) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
______
Opportunity to work on projects related to aerospace engineering outside the department. Requires prior approval.
Z. Cordero
No textbook information available

16.681 Topics in Aeronautics and Astronautics
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units arranged
______
Opportunity for study or laboratory project work not available elsewhere in the curriculum. Topics selected in consultation with the instructor.
Fall: Consult M. A. Stuppard
Spring: Consult M. A. Stuppard

16.682 Selected Topics in Aeronautics and Astronautics
______

Undergrad (IAP) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
______
Study by qualified students. Topics selected in consultation with the instructor. Prior approval required.
L. Backus
No required or recommended textbooks

16.683 Seminar in Aeronautics and Astronautics
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-0 [P/D/F]
______
Speakers from campus and industry discuss current activities and advances in aeronautics and astronautics. Restricted to Course 16 students.
Fall: Consult: M.A. Stuppard
IAP: Consult: M.A. Stuppard
Spring: Consult: M.A. Stuppard

16.687 Selected Topics in Aeronautics and Astronautics
______

Undergrad (IAP) Can be repeated for credit; partial term
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
______
Study by qualified students. Topics selected in consultation with the instructor. Prior approval required.
T. Prabha Srivastava, P. Greenspun
No textbook information available

16.691 Practicum Experience
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
TBA.
______
For Course 16 students participating in curriculum-related off-campus experiences in aerospace engineering and related areas. Before enrolling, a student must have an offer from a company or organization; must identify an appropriate supervisor in the AeroAstro department who, along with the off-campus supervisor, evaluate the student's performance; and must receive prior approval from the AeroAstro department. At the conclusion of the training, the student submits a substantive final report for review and approval by the MIT supervisor. Can be taken for up to 3 units. Contact the AeroAstro Undergraduate Office for details on procedures and restrictions.
Fall: Consult M. Stuppard
IAP: Consult M. Stuppard
Spring: Consult M. Stuppard
Summer: Consult M. Stuppard
No textbook information available (IAP 2024); No required or recommended textbooks (Spring 2024)

Flight Transportation

16.707[J] The History of Aviation
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as STS.467[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Reading course in the history of aviation, focusing on science and technology and cultural and political context. Themes include: the science of aeronautics, pilots and piloting, control systems and electronics, engineering epistemology, infrastructure, industry, government and politics, evolution of aeronautics research, culture and experience, automation and autonomy, role of MIT, literature and film. Case studies of specific systems and engineering projects. Emphasis is on book-length texts, close reading, historical methods of analyzing technological change. Study of social and political dimensions of engineering projects, examination of aviation institutions. Students prepare weekly response papers to readings, make extended presentations to class twice per semester, and submit a final research paper.
D. Mindell

16.71[J] The Airline Industry
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 1.232[J], 15.054[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Overview of the global airline industry, focusing on recent industry performance, current issues and challenges for the future. Fundamentals of airline industry structure, airline economics, operations planning, safety, labor relations, airports and air traffic control, marketing, and competitive strategies, with an emphasis on the interrelationships among major industry stakeholders. Recent research findings of the MIT Global Airline Industry Program are showcased, including the impacts of congestion and delays, evolution of information technologies, changing human resource management practices, and competitive effects of new entrant airlines. Taught by faculty participants of the Global Airline Industry Program.
F. Allroggen

16.715 Aerospace, Energy, and the Environment
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Chemistry (GIR) and (1.060, 2.006, 10.301, 16.003, 16.004, or permission of instructor)
Units: 3-0-9
______
Addresses energy and environmental challenges facing aerospace in the 21st century. Topics include: aircraft performance and energy requirements, propulsion technologies, jet fuels and alternative fuels, lifecycle assessment of fuels, combustion, emissions, climate change due to aviation, aircraft contrails, air pollution impacts of aviation, impacts of supersonic aircraft, and aviation noise. Includes an in-depth introduction to the relevant atmospheric and combustion physics and chemistry with no prior knowledge assumed. Discussion and analysis of near-term technological, fuel-based, regulatory and operational mitigation options for aviation, and longer-term technical possibilities.
S. Eastham, P. Prakash, J. Sabnis

16.72 Air Traffic Control
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces the various aspects of present and future Air Traffic Control systems. Descriptions of the present system: systems-analysis approach to problems of capacity and safety; surveillance, including NAS and ARTS; navigation subsystem technology; aircraft guidance and control; communications; collision avoidance systems; sequencing and spacing in terminal areas; future directions and development; critical discussion of past proposals and of probable future problem areas. Requires term paper.
Staff

16.763[J] Air Transportation Operations Research
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 1.233[J])
Prereq: 6.3702, 15.093, 16.71, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Presents a unified view of advanced quantitative analysis and optimization techniques applied to the air transportation sector. Considers the problem of operating and managing the aviation sector from the perspectives of the system operators (e.g., the FAA), the airlines, and the resultant impacts on the end-users (the passengers). Explores models and optimization approaches to system-level problems, airline schedule planning problems, and airline management challenges. Term paper required.
Staff

16.767 Introduction to Airline Transport Aircraft Systems and Automation
______

Graduate (IAP)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-2-1 [P/D/F]
______
Intensive one-week subject that uses the Boeing 767 aircraft as an example of a system of systems. Focuses on design drivers and compromises, system interactions, and human-machine interface. Morning lectures, followed by afternoon desktop simulator sessions. Critique and comparison with other transport aircraft designs. Includes one evening at Boston Logan International Airport aboard an aircraft. Enrollment limited.
Staff

16.781[J] Planning and Design of Airport Systems
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 1.231[J], IDS.670[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on current practice, developing trends, and advanced concepts in airport design and planning. Considers economic, environmental, and other trade-offs related to airport location, as well as the impacts of emphasizing "green" measures. Includes an analysis of the effect of airline operations on airports. Topics include demand prediction, determination of airfield capacity, and estimation of levels of congestion; terminal design; the role of airports in the aviation and transportation system; access problems; optimal configuration of air transport networks and implications for airport development; and economics, financing, and institutional aspects. Special attention to international practice and developments.
R. de Neufville, H. Balakrishnan, A.R, Odoni

Aerospace Systems

16.810 Engineering Design and Rapid Prototyping
______

Undergrad (IAP)
Prereq: (6.9110 and 6.9120) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-3-0
______
Builds fundamental skills in engineering design and develops a holistic view of the design process through conceiving, designing, prototyping, and testing a multidisciplinary component or system. Students are provided with the context in which the component or system must perform; they then follow a process to identify alternatives, enact a workable design, and improve the design through multi-objective optimization. The performance of end-state designs is verified by testing. Though students develop a physical component or system, the project is formulated so those from any engineering discipline can participate. The focus is on the design process itself, as well as the complementary roles of human creativity and computational approaches. Designs are built by small teams who submit their work to a design competition. Pedagogy based on active learning, blending lectures with design and manufacturing activities.  Limited to 30 students. Preference given to students in the Gordon-MIT Engineering Leadership Program.
O. L. de Weck, J. Magarian
No required or recommended textbooks

16.82 Flight Vehicle Engineering
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-3-6
Lecture: TR2-5 (33-419)
______
Design of an atmospheric flight vehicle to satisfy stated performance, stability, and control requirements. Emphasizes individual initiative, application of fundamental principles, and the compromises inherent in the engineering design process. Includes instruction and practice in written and oral communication, through team presentations and a written final report. Course 16 students are expected to complete two professional or concentration subjects from the departmental program before taking this capstone. Offered alternate Spring and Fall terms.
R.J. Hansman, J.P. How
No textbook information available

16.821 Flight Vehicle Development
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring) Institute Lab
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-10-6
______
Focuses on implementation and operation of a flight system. Emphasizes system integration, implementation, and performance verification using methods of experimental inquiry, and addresses principles of laboratory safety. Students refine subsystem designs and fabricate working prototypes. Includes component integration into the full system with detailed analysis and operation of the complete vehicle in the laboratory and in the field, as well as experimental analysis of subsystem performance, comparison with physical models of performance and design goals, and formal review of the overall system design. Knowledge of the engineering design process is helpful. Provides instruction in written and oral communication.
R.J. Hansman, M. Drela

16.83[J] Space Systems Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 12.43[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-3-6
______
Design of a complete space system, including systems analysis, trajectory analysis, entry dynamics, propulsion and power systems, structural design, avionics, thermal and environmental control, human factors, support systems, and weight and cost estimates. Students participate in teams, each responsible for an integrated vehicle design, providing experience in project organization and interaction between disciplines. Includes several aspects of team communication including three formal presentations, informal progress reports, colleague assessments, and written reports. Course 16 students are expected to complete two professional or concentration subjects from the departmental program before taking this capstone. Offered alternate fall and spring terms.
K. Cahoy

16.831[J] Space Systems Development
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Spring) Institute Lab
(Same subject as 12.431[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-10-6
Lecture: MW12.30-2 (9-354) Lab: TBA
______
Students build a space system, focusing on refinement of sub-system designs and fabrication of full-scale prototypes. Sub-systems are integrated into a vehicle and tested. Sub-system performance is verified using methods of experimental inquiry, and is compared with physical models of performance and design goals. Communication skills are honed through written and oral reports. Formal reviews include the Implementation Plan Review and the Acceptance Review. Knowledge of the engineering design process is helpful.
G. Lordos, K. Cahoy
No textbook information available

16.839[J] Operating in the Lunar Environment
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as MAS.839[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-2-8
______
Explores in detail the design and engineering challenges posed by operating in the lunar environment. Students work in teams to design a payload to address strategic objectives associated with NASA's Artemis program, aiming to enable near-term sustainable settlements on the lunar surface. Lectures and associated recitations explore varying mission goals and operating environments, from lunar-class launch, to orbiters, landers, rovers, and habitats. Guest lecturers include prominent engineers, scientists, industry players, and policymakers with direct experience in lunar mission design and development. Enrollment limited; admission by application.
J. Hoffman, A. Ekblaw

16.84 Advanced Autonomous Robotic Systems
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 6.4200 or permission of instructor
Units: 2-6-4
Lecture: M2 (33-422) Recitation: TBA
______
Students design an autonomous vehicle system to satisfy stated performance goals. Emphasizes both hardware and software components of the design and implementation. Entails application of fundamental principles and design engineering in both individual and group efforts. Students showcase the final design to the public at the end of the term.
G. Long
No required or recommended textbooks

16.842 Fundamentals of Systems Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
______
General introduction to systems engineering for aerospace and more general electro-mechanical-cyber systems. Built on the V-model as well as an agile approach. Topics include stakeholder analysis, requirements definition, system architecture and concept generation, trade-space exploration and concept selection, design definition and optimization, system integration and interface management, system safety, verification and validation, and commissioning and operations. Discusses the trade-offs between performance, life-cycle cost and system operability. Readings based on systems engineering standards. Individual homework assignments apply concepts from class. Prepares students for the systems field exam in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics.
A. Siddiqi, E.F. Crawley

16.851 Introduction to Satellite Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall); first half of term
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
______
Covers the principles and governing equations fundamental to the design, launch, and operation of artificial satellites in Earth's orbit and beyond. Material includes the vis-viva equation; the rocket equation; basic orbital maneuvers, including Hohmann transfers; bielliptic trajectories, as well as spiral transfers; the link budget equation; spacecraft power and propulsion; thermal equilibrium and interactions of spacecraft with the space environment, such as aerodynamic drag; electrostatic charging; radiation; and meteorids. Spacecraft are initially treated parametrically as point masses and then as rigid bodies subject to Euler's equations of rotational motion. Serves as a prerequisite for more advanced material in satellite engineering, including the technological implementation of various subsystems. Lectures are offered in a hybrid format, in person and remote.
O. de Weck

16.853 Advanced Satellite Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall); second half of term
Prereq: 16.66 and 16.851
Units: 2-0-4
______
Advanced material in satellite engineering, including the physical implementation of spacecraft hardware and software in payloads and bus subsystems, including structures, attitude determination and control, electrical power systems (EPS), control and data handling (CDH), guidance navigation and control (GNC), thermal management, communications, and others. Examples of spacecraft technologies and design tradeoffs are highlighted based on past, current, and future missions. Emphasis on mission success and identification and preventation of spacecraft and mission failures modes. Prepares students for the design of Earth observation as well as interplanetary science missions. Advanced assignments require computational skills in Matlab or Python and short presentations. Guest speakers from NASA and industry. Serves as a basis for the field examination in space systems.
O. de Weck

16.854 Spacecraft Laboratory
______

Graduate (Spring); second half of term
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 16.851 and permission of instructor
Units: 1-2-3
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Practical work in a spacecraft laboratory environment, including learning about cleanroom environments, satellite integration, and testing. Topics include handling of electrostatic discharge (ESD) sensitive electronics, working in a cleanroom, performing spacecraft component and qualification testing using shaker tables to simulate launch and deployment loads, thermal and vacuum testing, and designing and executing a successful spacecraft/instrument test campaign. Emphasis on obtaining laboratory data from sensors such as accelerometers, thermal sensors, and small satellite hardware, and comparing expected results against actual behaviors. Students carry out exercises in small teams and submit digital laboratory reports.
Staff

16.855[J] Systems Architecting Applied to Enterprises
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as EM.429[J], IDS.336[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: T EVE (4-7 PM) (1-390)
______
Focuses on understanding, designing and transforming sociotechnical enterprises using systems principles and practices. Includes discussions and reading on enterprise theory, systems architecting, transformation challenges and case studies of evolving enterprises. Covers frameworks and methods for ecosystem analysis, stakeholder analysis, design thinking, systems architecture and evaluation, and human-centered enterprise design strategies. Students engage in interactive breakout sessions during class and participate in a selected small team project to design a future architecture for a real-world enterprise. Selected projects are based on student interests in enterprises such as small, medium, or large companies, government agencies, academic units, start-ups, and nonprofit organizations.
D. Rhodes
No required or recommended textbooks

16.857[J] Asking How Space Enabled Designs Advance Justice and Development
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as MAS.858[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines theoretical and practical challenges of applying complex technology, such as space systems, to advance justice and development within human society. Proposes and critiques a concept of justice and development based on attainment of the US Sustainable Development Goals. Analyzes text by historians and economists around global patterns of uneven technology access. Teaches systems engineering tools to analyze the context, stakeholders, functions and forms of complex systems that impact society. Presents six space technologies used for specific Sustainable Development Goal. Students read several text, discuss key themes, write reflective responses, and write a research proposal on a topic of their choice. Part of two-class series on space technology and sustainable development. Limited to 15.
D. Wood

16.858 Introduction to Discrete Math and Systems Theory for Engineers
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
General discrete math topics include mathematical reasoning, combinatorial analysis, discrete structures (sets, permutations, relations, graphs, trees, and finite state machines), algorithmic thinking and complexity, modeling computation (languages and grammars, finite state machines), and Boolean algebra. Emphasis is on the use of the basic principles to solve engineering problems rather than applying formulae or studying the theoretical mathematical foundations of the topics. Real aerospace engineering examples are used. Enrollment may be limited.
N. Leveson

16.861 Engineering Systems Analysis for Design
______

Graduate (Fall)
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 1.146, 16.861, EM.422, IDS.332)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Credit cannot also be received for EM.423, IDS.333
______
Practical-oriented subject that builds upon theory and methods and culminates in extended application. Covers methods to identify, value, and implement flexibility in design (real options). Topics include definition of uncertainties, simulation of performance for scenarios, screening models to identify desirable flexibility, decision analysis, and multidimensional economic evaluation. Students demonstrate proficiency through an extended application to a system design of their choice. Complements research or thesis projects. Class is "flipped" to maximize student engagement and learning. Meets with IDS.333 in the first half of term. Enrollment limited.
R. de Neufville

16.863[J] System Safety Concepts
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as IDS.340[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers important concepts and techniques in designing and operating safety-critical systems. Topics include the nature of risk, formal accident and human error models, causes of accidents, fundamental concepts of system safety engineering, system and software hazard analysis, designing for safety, fault tolerance, safety issues in the design of human-machine interaction, verification of safety, creating a safety culture, and management of safety-critical projects. Includes a class project involving the high-level system design and analysis of a safety-critical system. Enrollment may be limited.
N. Leveson

16.88[J] Prototyping our Sci-Fi Space Future: Designing & Deploying Projects for Zero Gravity Flights
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as MAS.838[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-2-8
______
Instruction in project development, prototyping, and deployment readiness for parabolic flights. Admitted student teams are offered flyer and project-deployment slots on the Space Exploration Initiative's spring parabolic flight, upon successful completion of the course in the fall and integration with the flight provider. Covers three main topic areas: 1) rapid prototyping and engineering skills to prepare projects for operation in microgravity; 2) logistics, training, and safety pre-approval steps to meet flight readiness requirements and pass a Technical Readiness Review (TRR); and 3) creative and technical lenses for the future of space exploration, examining the MIT Space Exploration Initiative's design and prototyping approach, and MIT parabolic flight research examples across Science, Engineering, Art, and Design, and across departments. Enrollment limited; admission by application.
C. Paige, A. Ekblaw, J. Hoffman

16.885 Aircraft Systems Engineering
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-1-8
______
Holistic view of the aircraft as a system, covering basic systems engineering, cost and weight estimation, basic aircraft performance, safety and reliability, life cycle topics, aircraft subsystems, risk analysis and management, and system realization. Small student teams retrospectively analyze an existing aircraft covering: key design drivers and decisions; aircraft attributes and subsystems; operational experience. Oral and written versions of the case study are delivered. Focuses on a systems engineering analysis of the Space Shuttle. Studies both design and operations of the shuttle, with frequent lectures by outside experts. Students choose specific shuttle systems for detailed analysis and develop new subsystem designs using state of the art technology.
R.J. Hansman

16.886 Air Transportation Systems Architecting
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-2-7
______
Addresses the architecting of air transportation systems. Focuses on the conceptual phase of product definition including technical, economic, market, environmental, regulatory, legal, manufacturing, and societal factors. Centers on a realistic system case study and includes a number of lectures from industry and government. Past examples include the Very Large Transport Aircraft, a Supersonic Business Jet and a Next Generation Cargo System. Identifies the critical system level issues and analyzes them in depth via student team projects and individual assignments. Overall goal is to produce a business plan and a system specifications document that can be used to assess candidate systems.
R.J. Hansman

16.887[J] Technology Roadmapping and Development
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as EM.427[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides a review of the principles, methods and tools of technology management for organizations and technologically-enabled systems including technology forecasting, scouting, roadmapping, strategic planning, R&D project execution, intellectual property management, knowledge management, partnering and acquisition, technology transfer, innovation management, and financial technology valuation. Topics explain the underlying theory and empirical evidence for technology evolution over time and contain a rich set of examples and practical exercises from aerospace and other domains, such as transportation, energy, communications, agriculture, and medicine. Special topics include Moore's law, S-curves, the singularity and fundamental limits to technology. Students develop a comprehensive technology roadmap on a topic of their own choice.
O. L. de Weck

16.888[J] Multidisciplinary Design Optimization
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as EM.428[J], IDS.338[J])
Prereq: 18.085 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-1-8
______
Systems modeling for design and optimization. Selection of design variables, objective functions and constraints. Overview of principles, methods and tools in multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO). Subsystem identification, development and interface design. Design of experiments (DOE). Review of linear (LP) and non-linear (NLP) constrained optimization formulations. Scalar versus vector optimization problems. Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) conditions of optimality, Lagrange multipliers, adjoints, gradient search methods, sensitivity analysis, geometric programming, simulated annealing, genetic algorithms and particle swarm optimization. Constraint satisfaction problems and isoperformance. Non-dominance and Pareto frontiers. Surrogate models and multifidelity optimization strategies. System design for value. Students execute a term project in small teams related to their area of interest. 
O.L. de Weck, J.J. Norheim

16.89[J] Space Systems Engineering
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as IDS.339[J])
Prereq: 16.842, 16.851, or permission of instructor
Units: 4-2-6
Lecture: TR2-5 (37-212) Lab: TBA
______
Focus on developing space system architectures. Applies subsystem knowledge gained in 16.851 to examine interactions between subsystems in the context of a space system design. Principles and processes of systems engineering including developing space architectures, developing and writing requirements, and concepts of risk are explored and applied to the project. Subject develops, documents, and presents a conceptual design of a space system including a preliminary spacecraft design.
E.F. Crawley, J.A. Hoffman
No textbook information available

16.891 Space Policy Seminar
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
Lecture: T1-3 (33-418)
______
Explores current and historical issues in space policy, highlighting NASA, DOD, and international space agencies. Covers NASA's portfolios in exploration, science, aeronautics, and technology. Discusses US and international space policy. NASA leadership, public private partnerships, and innovation framework are presented. Current and former government and industry leaders provide an "inside the beltway perspective." Study of Congress, the Executive, and government agencies results in weekly policy memos. White papers authored by students provide policy findings and recommendations to accelerate human spaceflight, military space, space technology investments, and space science missions. Intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduates interested in technology policy. Enrollment may be limited.
D.J. Newman, D.E. Hastings
No required or recommended textbooks

16.893 Engineering the Space Shuttle
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 4-0-8
______
Detailed historical and technical study of the Space Shuttle, the world's first reusable spacecraft, through lectures by the people who designed, built and operated it. Examines the political, economic and military factors that influenced the design of the Shuttle; looks deeply into the it's many subsystems; and explains how the Shuttle was operated. Lectures are both live and on video. Students work on a final project related to space vehicle design.
Staff

16.895[J] Engineering Apollo: The Moon Project as a Complex System
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as STS.471[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 4-0-8
______
Detailed technical and historical exploration of the Apollo project to fly humans to the moon and return them safely to Earth as an example of a complex engineering system. Emphasizes how the systems worked, the technical and social processes that produced them, mission operations, and historical significance. Guest lectures by MIT-affiliated engineers who contributed to and participated in the Apollo missions. Students work in teams on a final project analyzing an aspect of the historical project to articulate and synthesize ideas in engineering systems.
J. A. Hoffman and D. Mindell

Computation

16.90 Computational Modeling and Data Analysis in Aerospace Engineering
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 16.001, 16.002, 16.003, 16.004, or permission of instructor; Coreq: 6.3700 or 16.09
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: TR9.30-11 (33-419) Recitation: F2 (33-419)
______
Introduces principles, algorithms, and applications of computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Techniques include numerical integration of systems of ordinary differential equations; numerical discretization of partial differential equations; probabilistic modeling; and computational aspects of estimation and inference. Example applications will include modeling, design, and data analysis.
R. A. Radovitzky, D.L. Darmofal, J. Peraire
No textbook information available

16.901 Topics in Computation
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring); second half of term
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units arranged
______
Provides credit for undergraduate-level work in computation outside of regularly scheduled subjects. Intended for transfer credit and study abroad. Credit may be used to satisfy specific degree requirements in the Course 16 program. Requires prior approval. Consult M. A. Stuppard.
Staff

16.910[J] Introduction to Modeling and Simulation
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.096[J], 6.7300[J])
Prereq: 18.03 or 18.06
Units: 3-6-3
______
Introduction to computational techniques for modeling and simulation of a variety of large and complex engineering, science, and socio-economical systems. Prepares students for practical use and development of computational engineering in their own research and future work. Topics include mathematical formulations (e.g., automatic assembly of constitutive and conservation principles); linear system solvers (sparse and iterative); nonlinear solvers (Newton and homotopy); ordinary, time-periodic and partial differential equation solvers; and model order reduction. Students develop their own models and simulators for self-proposed applications, with an emphasis on creativity, teamwork, and communication. Prior basic linear algebra required and at least one numerical programming language (e.g., MATLAB, Julia, Python, etc.) helpful.
L. Daniel

16.920[J] Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.097[J], 6.7330[J])
Prereq: 18.03 or 18.06
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers the fundamentals of modern numerical techniques for a wide range of linear and nonlinear elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic partial differential and integral equations. Topics include mathematical formulations; finite difference, finite volume, finite element, and boundary element discretization methods; and direct and iterative solution techniques. The methodologies described form the foundation for computational approaches to engineering systems involving heat transfer, solid mechanics, fluid dynamics, and electromagnetics. Computer assignments requiring programming.
J. Peraire

16.930 Advanced Topics in Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 16.920
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers advanced topics in numerical methods for the discretization, solution, and control of problems governed by partial differential equations. Topics include the application of the finite element method to systems of equations with emphasis on equations governing compressible, viscous flows; grid generation; optimal control of PDE-constrained systems; a posteriori error estimation and adaptivity; reduced basis approximations and reduced-order modeling. Computer assignments require programming.
J. Peraire

16.940 Numerical Methods for Stochastic Modeling and Inference
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: (6.3702 and 16.920) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Advanced introduction to numerical methods for treating uncertainty in computational simulation. Draws examples from a range of engineering and science applications, emphasizing systems governed by ordinary and partial differential equations. Uncertainty propagation and assessment: Monte Carlo methods, variance reduction, sensitivity analysis, adjoint methods, polynomial chaos and Karhunen-Loève expansions, and stochastic Galerkin and collocation methods. Interaction of models with observational data, from the perspective of statistical inference: Bayesian parameter estimation, statistical regularization, Markov chain Monte Carlo, sequential data assimilation and filtering, and model selection.
Y. M. Marzouk

Other Graduate Subjects

16.THG Graduate Thesis
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of department
Units arranged
TBA.
______
Program of research leading to an SM, EAA, PhD, or ScD thesis; to be arranged by the student with an appropriate MIT faculty member, who becomes thesis supervisor. Restricted to students who have been admitted into the department.
Fall: J.P. How
IAP: E. Taylor De Barroso
Spring: J.P. How
Summer: J.P. How
No required or recommended textbooks

16.971 Practicum Experience
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
TBA.
______
For Course 16 students participating in curriculum-related off-campus experiences in aerospace engineering and related areas. Before enrolling, a student must have an offer from a company or organization; must identify an appropriate supervisor in the AeroAstro department who, along with the off-campus supervisor, evaluate the student's work; and must receive prior approval from the AeroAstro department. At the conclusion of the training, the student submits a substantive final report for review and approval by the MIT supervisor. Can be taken for up to 3 units. Contact the AeroAstro Graduate Office for details on procedures and restrictions.
Fall: Staff
IAP: Consult: E. Taylor de Barroso
Spring: Consult: E. Taylor de Barroso
Summer: Consult: E. Taylor de Barroso
No required or recommended textbooks

16.980 Advanced Project
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Study, original investigation, or lab project work level by qualified students. Topics selected in consultation with instructor. Prior approval required.
Fall: Consult: M.A. Stuppard
Spring: Consult: M.A. Stuppard

16.981 Advanced Project
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
TBA.
______
Study, original investigation, or lab project work by qualified students. Topics selected in consultation with instructor. Prior approval required.
Fall: Consult: M.A. Stuppard
IAP: Consult: M.A. Stuppard
Spring: C. Guerra Garcia
No textbook information available

16.984 Seminar
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-0 [P/D/F]
______
Discussion of current interest topics by staff and guest speakers. Prior approval required. Restricted to Course 16 students.
Fall: Consult: M.A. Stuppard
IAP: Consult: M.A. Stuppard
Spring: Consult: M.A. Stuppard

16.985[J] Global Operations Leadership Seminar
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
(Same subject as 2.890[J], 10.792[J], 15.792[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-0 [P/D/F]
Lecture: M EVE (4-6 PM) (E62-223)
______
Integrative forum in which worldwide leaders in business, finance, government, sports, and education share their experiences and insights with students aspiring to run global operations. Students play a large role in managing the seminar. Preference to LGO students.
Fall: T. Roemer
Spring: T. Roemer
No textbook information available

16.990[J] Leading Creative Teams
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring)
(Same subject as 6.9280[J], 15.674[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
Lecture: MW2.30-4 (45-102)
______
Prepares students to lead teams charged with developing creative solutions in engineering and technical environments. Grounded in research but practical in focus, equips students with leadership competencies such as building self-awareness, motivating and developing others, creative problem solving, influencing without authority, managing conflict, and communicating effectively. Teamwork skills include how to convene, launch, and develop various types of teams, including project teams. Learning methods emphasize personalized and experiential skill development. Enrollment limited.
Fall: D. Nino
Spring: D. Nino
No textbook information available

16.995 Doctoral Research and Communication Seminar
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-1
Lecture: F10-12 (37-212)
______
Presents fundamental concepts of technical communication. Addresses how to articulate a research problem, as well as the communication skills necessary to reach different audiences. The primary focus is on technical presentations, but includes aspects of written communication. Students give two technical talks during the term, and provide oral and written feedback to each other. Enrollment may be limited.
Fall: E.M. Greitzer, S.R. Hall
Spring: E.M. Greitzer, S.R. Hall
No required or recommended textbooks

16.997 How To Do Excellent Research
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 1-0-2
______
Presents and discusses skills valuable for starting research in the department, including time management; reading, reviewing, and writing technical papers; how to network in a research setting, how to be effective in a research group, and how to get good mentoring. In-class peer review is expected. Students write a final paper on one or more of the class topics. Enrollment is limited.
Staff

16.999 Teaching in Aeronautics and Astronautics
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
TBA.
______
For qualified students interested in gaining teaching experience. Classroom, tutorial, or laboratory teaching under the supervision of a faculty member. Enrollment limited by availability of suitable teaching assignments. Consult department.
Fall: Consult M.A. Stuppard
Spring: M. Stuppard
No textbook information available

16.S198 Advanced Special Subject in Mechanics and Physics of Fluids
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit; second half of term
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled fluids subjects. Prior approval required.
Fall: J.P. How
Spring: J.P. How

16.S199 Advanced Special Subject in Mechanics and Physics of Fluids
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled fluids subjects. Prior approval required.
Fall: Consult: j.P. How
Spring: Consult: J.P. How

16.S298 Advanced Special Subject in Materials and Structures
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled materials and structures subjects. Prior approval required.
Fall: J.P. How
Spring: J.P. How

16.S299 Advanced Special Subject in Materials and Structures
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled materials and structures subjects. Prior approval required.
Fall: Consult: J.P. How
Spring: Consult: J.P. How

16.S398 Advanced Special Subject in Information and Control
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
Fall: J.P. How
Spring: J.P. How

16.S399 Advanced Special Subject in Information and Control
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
J.P. How

16.S498 Advanced Special Subject in Humans and Automation
______

Graduate (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
L. Petersen, T. Heldt

16.S499 Advanced Special Subject in Humans and Automation
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
Fall: Consult: J.P. How
Spring: Consult: J.P. How

16.S598 Advanced Special Subject in Propulsion and Energy Conversion
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
Fall: J.P. How
Spring: J.P. How

16.S599 Advanced Special Subject in Propulsion and Energy Conversion
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
Fall: Consult: J.P. How
Spring: Consult: J.P. How

16.S798 Advanced Special Subject in Flight Transportation
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
Fall: Consult: J.P. How
Spring: Consult: J.P. How

16.S799 Advanced Special Subject in Flight Transportation
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
Fall: Consult: J.P. How
Spring: Consult: J.P. How

16.S890 Advanced Special Subject in Aerospace Systems
______

Graduate (IAP) Can be repeated for credit; partial term
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged [P/D/F]
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
M. Paluszek
Textbooks (IAP 2024)

16.S893 Advanced Special Subject in Aerospace Systems
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring) Can be repeated for credit; partial term
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
TBA.
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
O. de Weck, L. Carlone, P. Hajela
No textbook information available

16.S896 Advanced Special Subject in Aerospace Systems
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
Fall: Consult Consult: M. A. Stuppard
Spring: Consult Consult: M. A. Stuppard

16.S897 Advanced Special Subject in Aerospace Systems
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
J.P. How

16.S898 Advanced Special Subject in Aerospace Systems
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
Fall: R.J. Hansman
Spring: J.P. How

16.S899 Advanced Special Subject in Aerospace Systems
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit; second half of term
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
Fall: J.P. How
Spring: J.P. How

16.S948 Advanced Special Subject in Computation
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
Fall: J.P. How
Spring: J.P. How

16.S949 Advanced Special Subject in Computation
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
Fall: Consult: J.P. How
Spring: Consult: J.P. How

16.S982 Advanced Special Subject
______

Graduate (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of department
Units arranged
Lecture: F9-11 (33-422)
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
N. Leveson
No textbook information available

16.S983 Advanced Special Subject
______

Graduate (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
TBA.
______
Organized lecture or laboratory subject consisting of material not available in regularly scheduled subjects. Prior approval required.
N. Leveson
No textbook information available


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