Registrar Home | Registrar Search:
 
  MIT Course Picker | Hydrant     
Home | Subject Search | Help | Symbols Help | Pre-Reg Help | Final Exam Schedule | My Selections
 

Health Sciences and Technology
Fall 2024


IMPORTANT NOTES regarding preclinical subjects (HST.011-HST.200)*:

Students not enrolled in an HST program are limited to two HST preclinical courses and must provide justification for enrolling in these courses. This action must be approved by the course director and the student's advisor. These subjects are scheduled according to the Harvard Medical School academic calendar, which differs from the MIT calendar. Students whose graduation depends upon completing one or more of these subjects should take particular care regarding the schedule.

* HST.163 and HST.198 are NOT included in the two-course limit.

HST.011 Human Functional Anatomy
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with HST.010)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-11-10
Add to schedule HST.010: Begins 9/9. Final exam at hms. Lecture: MW12.30-4.30 (MEC-209) Lab: R4BS (MEC 4TH FLOOR)
Add to schedule HST.011: Begins 9/9. Final exam at hms. Lecture: MW12.30-4.30 (MEC-209) Lab: R4BS (MEC 4TH FLOOR)
______
Lectures, detailed laboratory dissections, and prosections provide a thorough exploration of the gross structure and function of the human body. Fundamental principles of bioengineering are employed to promote analytical approaches to understanding the body's design. The embryology of major organ systems is presented, together with certain references to phylogenetic development, as a basis for comprehending anatomical complexity. Correlation clinics stress both normal and abnormal functions of the body and present evolving knowledge of genes responsible for normal and abnormal anatomy. Lecturers focus on current problems in organ system research. Only HST students may register under HST.010, graded P/D/F. Lab fee. Enrollment restricted to graduate students.
T. Van Houten, R. Mitchell
HST.010: No textbook information available
HST.011: No textbook information available

HST.015 MATLAB for Medicine
______

Graduate (Summer)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4 [P/D/F]
______
Practical introduction to use of quantitative methods in medicine and health research. Each session covers a different topic in quantitative techniques, provides an application to medicine, and includes a modeling activity using MATLAB. Students also complete problem sets. Restricted to first year HST MD students.
HST Faculty
No textbook information available

HST.021 Musculoskeletal Pathophysiology
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with HST.020)
Prereq: HST.030 and HST.160
Units: 3-0-3
______
Growth and development of normal bone and joints, the biophysics of bone and response to stress and fracture, calcium and phosphate homeostasis and regulation by parathyroid hormone and vitamin D, and the pathogenesis of metabolic bone diseases and disease of connective tissue, joints, and muscles, with consideration of possible mechanisms and underlying metabolic derangements. Only HST students may register under HST.020, graded P/D/F. Enrollment limited; restricted to medical and graduate students.
M. Bouxsein, L. Tarter

HST.031 Human Pathology
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with HST.030)
Prereq: Biology (GIR), Physics I (GIR), and permission of instructor
Units: 4-3-8
Add to schedule HST.030: Begins 9/10. Final exam at hms. Lecture: TR8.30-11.30 (MEC-209)
Add to schedule HST.031: Begins 9/10. Final exam at hms. Lecture: TR8.30-11.30 (MEC-209)
______
Introduction to the functional structure of normal cells and tissues, pathologic principles of cellular adaptation and injury, inflammation, circulatory disorders, immunologic injury, infection, genetic disorders, and neoplasia in humans. Lectures, conferences emphasizing clinical correlations and contemporary experimental biology. Laboratories with examination of microscopic and gross specimens, and autopsy case studies emphasizing modern pathology practice. Only HST students may register under HST.030, graded P/D/F. Lab fee. Enrollment limited.
R. N. Mitchell, R. Padera
HST.030: Textbooks (Fall 2024)
HST.031: Textbooks (Fall 2024)

HST.041 Mechanisms of Microbial Pathogenesis
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with HST.040)
Prereq: Biology (GIR), 7.05, and permission of instructor
Units: 4-2-6
URL: HST.041: https://hst.mit.edu/academic-programs/courses
Add to schedule HST.040: Begins 9/3. Final exam at hms. Lecture: TR8.30-12 (MEC-227)
Add to schedule HST.041: Begins 9/3. Final exam at hms. Lecture: TR8.30-12 (MEC-227)
______
Deals with the mechanisms of pathogenesis of bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms. Approach spans mechanisms from molecular to clinical aspects of disease. Topics selected for intrinsic interest and cover the demonstrated spectrum of pathophysiologic mechanisms. Only HST students may register under HST.040, graded P/D/F. Lab fee. Enrollment limited.
S. Kanjilal, K. Hysell
HST.040: No textbook information available
HST.041: No textbook information available

HST.061 Endocrinology
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Biology (GIR), 7.05, and permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Physiology and pathophysiology of the human endocrine system. Three hours of lecture and section each week concern individual parts of the endocrine system. Topics include assay techniques, physiological integration, etc. At frequent clinic sessions, patients are presented who demonstrate clinical problems considered in the didactic lectures. Only HST students may register under HST.060, graded P/D/F. Enrollment limited.
Kettyle, Y.-M. Chan, A, Abreu

HST.071 Human Reproductive Biology
______

Graduate (Fall); first half of term
(Subject meets with HST.070)
Prereq: 7.05 and permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-2
Add to schedule HST.070: Meets 9/4-10/16. Ends Oct 11. Lecture: MW1.30-5 (1-390)
Add to schedule HST.071: Meets 9/4-10/16. Ends Oct 11. Lecture: MW1.30-5 (1-390)
______
Lectures and clinical case discussions designed to provide the student with a clear understanding of the physiology, endocrinology, and pathology of human reproduction. Emphasis is on the role of technology in reproductive science. Suggestions for future research contributions in the field are probed. Students become involved in the wider aspects of reproduction, such as prenatal diagnosis, in vitro fertilization, abortion, menopause, contraception and ethics relation to reproductive science. Only HST students may register under HST.070, graded P/D/F.
A. Koniaris, D. Page, T. Lau
HST.070: Textbooks (Fall 2024)
HST.071: Textbooks (Fall 2024)

HST.081 Hematology
______

Graduate (Spring); partial term
(Subject meets with HST.080)
Prereq: 7.05 and permission of instructor
Units: 2-1-3
______
Intensive survey of the biology, physiology and pathophysiology of blood with systematic consideration of hematopoiesis, white blood cells, red blood cells, platelets, coagulation, plasma proteins, and hematologic malignancies. Emphasis given equally to didactic discussion and analysis of clinical problems. Enrollment limited.
D. Bauer, J. Freed, S. Schulman

HST.091 Cardiovascular Pathophysiology
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with HST.090)
Prereq: (HST.030 or HST.031) and permission of instructor
Units: 4-3-8
______
Normal and pathologic physiology of the heart and vascular system. Emphasis includes hemodynamics, electrophysiology, gross pathology, and clinical correlates of cardiovascular function in normal and in a variety of disease states. Special attention given to congenital, rheumatic, valvular heart disease and cardiomyopathy. Only HST students may register under HST.090, graded P/D/F. Enrollment limited.
C. Stultz, T. Heldt, Staff

HST.101 Respiratory Pathophysiology
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with HST.100)
Prereq: Physics I (GIR), 7.05, and permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
______
Lectures, seminars, and laboratories cover the histology, cell biology, and physiological function of the lung with multiple examples related to common diseases of the lung. A quantitative approach to the physics of gases, respiratory mechanics, and gas exchange is provided to explain pathological mechanisms. Use of medical ventilators is discussed in lecture and in laboratory experiences. For MD candidates and other students with background in science. Only HST students may register under HST.100, graded P/D/F. Enrollment limited.
E. Roche, C. Hardin, K. Hibbert

HST.111 Renal Pathophysiology
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with HST.110)
Prereq: 7.05 and permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
______
Considers the normal physiology of the kidney and the pathophysiology of renal disease. Renal regulation of sodium, potassium, acid, and water balance are emphasized as are the mechanism and consequences of renal failure. Included also are the pathology and pathophysiology of clinical renal disorders such as acute and chronic glomerulonephritis, pyelonephritis, and vascular disease. New molecular insights into transporter mutations and renal disease are discussed. Only HST students may register under HST.110, graded P/D/F. Enrollment limited.
G. McMahon, M. Yeung

HST.121 Gastroenterology
______

Graduate (Fall); second half of term
(Subject meets with HST.120)
Prereq: Biology (GIR), Physics I (GIR), 7.05, and permission of instructor
Units: 3-1-2
URL: HST.121: https://hst.mit.edu/academic-programs/courses
Add to schedule HST.120: Begins 10/21. Final exam at hms. Begins Oct 21. Lecture: MW1-5 (MEC-209)
Add to schedule HST.121: Begins 10/21. Final exam at hms. Begins Oct 21. Lecture: MW1-5 (MEC-209)
______
Presents the anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, biophysics, and bioengineering of the gastrointestinal tract and associated pancreatic, liver, and biliary systems. Emphasis on the molecular and pathophysiological basis of disease where known. Covers gross and microscopic pathology and clinical aspects. Formal lectures given by core faculty, with some guest lectures by local experts. Selected seminars conducted by students with supervision of faculty. Only HST students may register under HST.120, graded P/D/F. Enrollment limited.
A. Rutherford, S. Flier
HST.120: Textbooks (Fall 2024)
HST.121: Textbooks (Fall 2024)

HST.131 Neuroscience
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with HST.130)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 6-3-6
URL: HST.131: https://hst.mit.edu/academic-programs/courses
Add to schedule HST.130: Begins 9/4. Final exam at hms. Lecture: MW8.30-12 (MEC-209) Recitation: F8.30-10.30 (MEC-209)
Add to schedule HST.131: Begins 9/4. Final exam at hms. Lecture: MW8.30-12 (MEC-209) Recitation: F8.30-10.30 (MEC-209)
______
Comprehensive study of neuroscience where students explore the brain on levels ranging from molecules and cells through neural systems, perception, memory, and behavior. Includes some aspects of clinical neuroscience, within neuropharmacology, pathophysiology, and neurology. Lectures supplemented by conferences and labs. Labs review neuroanatomy at the gross and microscopic levels. Only HST students may register under HST.130, graded P/D/F. Limited to 50.
J. Assad, M. Frosch
HST.130: Textbooks (Fall 2024)
HST.131: Textbooks (Fall 2024)

HST.147 Biochemistry and Metabolism
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with HST.146)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-5
Add to schedule HST.146: Classes begin 9/12. Final exam at hms. Lecture: R12.30-3.30 (MEC-250)
Add to schedule HST.147: Classes begin 9/12. Final exam at hms. Lecture: R12.30-3.30 (MEC-250)
______
First-year graduate level intensive subject in human biochemistry and physiological chemistry that focuses on intermediary metabolism, structures of key intermediates and enzymes important in human disease. Subject is divided into four areas: carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleic acids. The importance of these areas is underscored with examples from diseases and clinical correlations. Preparatory sessions meet in August. Only HST students may register under HST.146, graded P/D/F. Enrollment limited.
R. Sharma
HST.146: Textbooks (Fall 2024)
HST.147: Textbooks (Fall 2024)

HST.151 Principles of Pharmacology
______

Graduate (IAP, Spring); partial term
(Subject meets with HST.150)
Prereq: Biology (GIR), Physics I (GIR), and 7.05
Units: 6-0-6
______
An introduction to pharmacology. Topics include mechanisms of drug action, dose-response relations, pharmacokinetics, drug delivery systems, drug metabolism, toxicity of pharmacological agents, drug interactions, and substance abuse. Selected agents and classes of agents examined in detail. Course follows HMS calendar. Restricted to HST MD & HST PhD students.
IAP: S. Forman
Spring: S. Forman

HST.161 Genetics in Modern Medicine
______

Graduate (Fall); second half of term
(Subject meets with HST.160)
Prereq: 7.05
Units: 2-0-4
Add to schedule HST.160: Begins 10/29. Final exam at hms. Begins Oct 21. Lecture: T12.30-3.30 (MEC-209)
Add to schedule HST.161: Begins 10/29. Final exam at hms. Begins Oct 21. Lecture: T12.30-3.30 (MEC-209)
______
Provides a foundation for understanding the relationship between molecular biology, genetics, and medicine. Starts with an introduction to molecular genetics, and quickly transitions to the genetic basis of diseases, including chromosomal, mitochondrial and epigenetic disease. Translation of clinical understanding into analysis at the level of the gene, chromosome, and molecule; the concepts and techniques of molecular biology and genomics; and the strategies and methods of genetic analysis. Includes diagnostics (prenatal and adult), cancer genetics, and the development of genetic therapies (RNA, viral, and genome editing). The clinical relevance of these areas is underscored with patient presentations. Only HST students may register under HST.160, graded P/D/F.
S. Nissim
HST.160: Textbooks (Fall 2024)
HST.161: Textbooks (Fall 2024)

HST.163 Molecular Diagnostics and Bioinformatics
______

Graduate (Fall); first half of term
(Subject meets with HST.162)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
Add to schedule HST.162: Meets 9/10-10/22. Final exam at hms. Ends Oct 11. Lecture: T12.30-3.30 (MEC-209)
Add to schedule HST.163: Meets 9/10-10/22. Final exam at hms. Ends Oct 11. Lecture: T12.30-3.30 (MEC-209)
______
Introduction of molecular diagnostic methods in medicine and relevant bioinformatics methods. Discussion of principles of molecular testing for diagnosis of somatic and germline diseases using FISH, classical genotyping, array CGH, next generation sequencing, and other technologies. Case conferences emphasize clinical correlation and integration of information from multiple diagnostic tests. Bioinformatics lectures, problem sets, and laboratory sessions will introduce key concepts in biological sequence analysis and provide experience with bioinformatics tools. HST.015 and HST.191 recommended. Only HST students may register under HST.162, P/D/F. Enrollment limited, preference to HST students.
G. Gerber, L. Le
HST.162: Textbooks (Fall 2024)
HST.163: Textbooks (Fall 2024)

HST.165 Principles of Biomedical Imaging
______

Graduate (IAP)
(Subject meets with HST.164)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
______
Reviews fundamental principles and techniques underlying modern biomedical imaging, as well as their application in modern medicine. Particular emphasis on magnetic resonance; also covers ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography and optical techniques. Didactic lectures accompanied by problem sets and experiments with portable magnetic resonance systems and ultrasound systems. Focuses on the quantitative aspects of biomedical imaging and requires a knowledge of differential equations, MATLAB, and intermediate-level physics. Only HST students may register under HST.164, P/D/F. Restricted to HST students.
S. Huang, D. Sosnovik

HST.176 Cellular and Molecular Immunology
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with HST.175)
Prereq: 7.05
Units: 6-0-6
URL: HST.176: https://hst.mit.edu/academic-programs/courses
Add to schedule HST.175: Begins 9/9. Final exam at ragon. Lecture: MW8.30-11 (RAGON)
Add to schedule HST.176: Begins 9/9. Final exam at ragon. Lecture: MW8.30-11 (RAGON)
______
Covers cells and tissues of the immune system, lymphocyte development, the structure and function of antigen receptors, the cell biology of antigen processing and presentation including molecular structure and assembly of MHC molecules, lymphocyte activation, the biology of cytokines, leukocyte-endothelial interactions, and the pathogenesis of immunologically mediated diseases. Consists of lectures and tutorials in which clinical cases are discussed with faculty tutors. Details of each case covering a number of immunological issues in the context of disease are posted on a student website. Only HST students may register under HST.175, graded P/D/F. Limited to 45.
S. Pillai, B. Cherayil
HST.175: Textbooks (Fall 2024)
HST.176: Textbooks (Fall 2024)

HST.191 Introduction to Biostatistics
______

Graduate (Summer)
(Subject meets with HST.190)
Prereq: Calculus II (GIR)
Units: 3-0-3
______
Provides training on how to comprehend, critique and communicate findings from biomedical literature. Considers how to assess the importance of chance in the interpretation of experimental data. Topics include probability theory, chi-squared and t-tests, ANOVA, linear and logistic regression, survival analysis, and statistical analysis using MATLAB. Includes critical reading of studies published in medical literature.  Enrollment limited; restricted to HST students.
N. Hejazi
HST.190: No textbook information available
HST.191: Textbooks (Summer 2024)
______

Summer 2024 Description for Introduction to Biostatistics
(Subject meets with HST.190)
Prereq:Calculus II (GIR)
Units: 3-0-3
Provides training on how to comprehend, critique and communicate findings from biomedical literature. Considers how to assess the importance of chance in the interpretation of experimental data. Topics include probability theory, chi-squared and t-tests, ANOVA, linear and logistic regression, survival analysis, and statistical analysis using MATLAB. Includes critical reading of studies published in medical literature.  Enrollment limited; restricted to HST students.

N. Hejazi
Section: M, W, F 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM Harvard Medical - MEC 209 From 12-AUG-24 Thru 06-SEP-24
HST.190: No textbook information available
HST.191: Textbooks (Summer 2024)

HST.192 Medical Decision Analysis and Probabilistic Medical Inference
______

Graduate (IAP)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-2 [P/D/F]
______
Teaches the essentials of quantitative diagnostic reasoning and medical decision analysis. Guides participants through the process of choosing an appropriate contemporary medical problem in which risk-benefit tradeoffs play a prominent role, conducting a decision analysis, and ultimately publishing the results in a medical journal. Topics include decision trees, influence diagrams, Markov decision models and Monte Carlo simulation, methods for quantifying patient values, Bayesian inference, decision thresholds, and the cognitive science of medical decision making. HST.191 recommended. Limited to 8; preference to HST students.
Staff

HST.195 Clinical Epidemiology
______

Graduate (IAP, Spring); first half of term
(Subject meets with HST.194)
Prereq: HST.190
Units: 1-0-1
______
Introduces methods for the generation, analysis, and interpretation of data for clinical research. Major topics include the design of surveys, predictive models, randomized trials, clinical cohorts, and analyses of electronic health records. Prepares students to formulate well-defined research questions, design data collection, evaluate algorithms for clinical prediction, design studies for causal inference, and identify and prevent biases in clinical research. Emphasizes critical thinking and practical applications, including daily assignments based on articles published in major clinical journals and the discussion of a case study each week. Trains students to comprehend, critique, and communicate findings from the biomedical literature. Familiarity with regression modeling and basic statistical theory is a prerequisite. Only HST students may register under HST.194, graded P/D/F. Enrollment limited; restricted to medical and graduate students.
M. Hernan

HST.196 Teaching Health Sciences and Technology
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Provides teaching experience (classroom, laboratory, field, recitation, tutorial) under the direction of faculty member(s). Students may prepare instructional materials, lead discussion groups, provide individualized instruction, monitor students' progress, and gain experience delivering other educational elements. Limited to qualified graduate students.
T. Anderson
No textbook information available

HST.198 Independent Study in Health Sciences and Technology
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
URL: https://hst.mit.edu/academic-programs/courses
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Opportunity for independent study of health sciences and technology under regular supervision by an HST faculty member. Projects require prior approval from the HST Academic Office, as well as a substantive paper.
Fall: HST Faculty
IAP: HST Faculty
Spring: HST Faculty
Summer: HST Faculty
No textbook information available

HST.200 Introduction to Clinical Medicine
______

Graduate (IAP, Spring); partial term
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 9-19-12 [P/D/F]
______
Intensive preparation for clinical clerkships that introduces the basic skills involved in examination of the patient in addition to history taking and the patient interview. Provides exposure to clinical problems in medicine, surgery, and pediatrics. Students report their findings through history taking and oral presentations. Restricted to MD program students.
IAP: W. Goessling, D. Rubinson, D. Solomon, J. Irani, A. Vise
Spring: W. Goessling, D. Rubinson, D. Solomon, J. Irani, A. Vise

HST.201 Introduction to Clinical Medicine and Medical Engineering I
______

Graduate (Summer)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 0-20-0 [P/D/F]
______
Develop skills in patient interviewing and physical examination; become proficient at organizing and communicating clinical information in both written and oral forms; begin integrating history, physical, and laboratory data with pathophysiologic principles; and become familiar with the clinical decision-making process and broad economic, ethical, and sociological issues involved in patient care. There are two sections: one at Mount Auburn Hospital and one at West Roxbury VA Hospital, subsequent registration into HST.202 must be continued at the same hospital as HST.201. Restricted to MEMP students.
N. Price, A. Romano, J. Strymish, C. Stultz
No textbook information available
______

Summer 2024 Description for Introduction to Clinical Medicine and Medical Engineering I
Prereq:Permission of instructor
Units: 0-20-0 [P/D/F]
Develop skills in patient interviewing and physical examination; become proficient at organizing and communicating clinical information in both written and oral forms; begin integrating history, physical, and laboratory data with pathophysiologic principles; and become familiar with the clinical decision-making process and broad economic, ethical, and sociological issues involved in patient care. There are two sections: one at Mount Auburn Hospital and one at West Roxbury VA Hospital, subsequent registration into HST.202 must be continued at the same hospital as HST.201. Restricted to MEMP students.

C. Stultz, N. Price, A. Romano, J. Strymish
Section: M, T, W, Th, F From 28-MAY-24 Thru 03-JUL-24
No textbook information available

HST.202 Introduction to Clinical Medicine and Medical Engineering II
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer)
Prereq: HST.201
Units: 0-20-0 [P/D/F]
Add to schedule Individually arranged hours. Monday through friday 9am-5pm. Lab: MTWRF9-1,MTWRF1-5 (WRVAH-HOSPITAL)
______
Strengthens the skills developed in HST.201 through a six-week clerkship in medicine at a Harvard-affiliated teaching hospital. Students serve as full-time members of a ward team and participate in longitudinal patient care. In addition, students participate in regularly scheduled teaching conferences focused on principles of patient management. Restricted to MEMP students.
Fall: A. Romano, J. Strymish, C. Stultz
IAP: N. Price, A. Romano, J. Strymish, C. Stultz
Spring: A. Romano, J. Strymish, C. Stultz
Summer: A. Romano, J. Strymish, C. Stultz
No textbook information available
______

Summer 2024 Description for Introduction to Clinical Medicine and Medical Engineering II
Prereq:HST.201
Units: 0-20-0 [P/D/F]
Strengthens the skills developed in HST.201 through a six-week clerkship in medicine at a Harvard-affiliated teaching hospital. Students serve as full-time members of a ward team and participate in longitudinal patient care. In addition, students participate in regularly scheduled teaching conferences focused on principles of patient management. Restricted to MEMP students.

C. Stultz, A. Romano, J. Strymish
Section: Schedule individually arranged West Roxbury VA Hospital From Thru
No textbook information available

HST.207 Introduction to Clinical Medicine and Medical Engineering
______

Graduate (Spring); partial term
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 0-30-0 [P/D/F]
______
Introduction to the intricacies of clinical decision-making through broad exposure to how clinicians think and work in teams. Instruction provided in patient interviewing and physical examination; organizing and communicating clinical information in written and oral forms; and integrating history, physical, and laboratory data with pathophysiologic principles. Attention to the economic, ethical, and sociological issues involved in patient care. Consists of immersive clinical experiences at Massachusetts General Hospital, leveraging extensive educational resources across inpatient clinical floors, ambulatory clinics, procedural/surgical suites, diagnostic testing areas, simulation learning lab, and didactic settings, followed by a focused experience in which students develop a proposal to solve an unmet need identified during their clinical experiences. Equivalent to combination of HST.201 and HST.202. Restricted to HST MEMP students.
C. Stultz, J. Ziperstein, P. Ankomah, A. Puig

HST.220 Introduction to the Care of Patients
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 1-0-2 [P/D/F]
______
Provides an introduction to the care of patients through opportunities to observe and participate in doctor-patient interaction in clinical settings and a longitudinal preceptorship experience with HST alumni physicians. Students are exposed to some of the practical realities of providing patient care. Topics include basic interviewing; issues of ethics, bias, and confidentiality; and other aspects of the doctor-patient relationship. The introductory session is held at HMS or Massachusetts General Hospital and the preceptorships are at several Harvard hospitals in Boston. Requirements include attendance at the introductory session and meetings scheduled with the preceptor.
N. Tetteh

HST.240 Translational Medicine Preceptorship
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring, Summer)
Prereq: HST.035
Units: 0-12-0
Add to schedule Lab: TBA
______
Individually designed preceptorship joins together scientific research and clinical medicine. Students devote approximately half of their time to clinical experiences, and the remaining part to scholarly work in basic or clinical science. The two might run concomitantly or in series. Follow a clinical preceptor's daily activity, including aspects of patient care, attending rounds, conferences, and seminars. Research involves formal investigation of a focused and directed issue related to selected clinical area. Final paper required. Limited to students in the GEMS Program.
Fall: E. Edelman
Summer: E. Edelman
No textbook information available

HST.420[J] Principles and Practice of Assistive Technology
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 2.78[J], 6.4530[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-4-6
______
Students work closely with people with disabilities to develop assistive and adaptive technologies that help them live more independently. Covers design methods and problem-solving strategies; human factors; human-machine interfaces; community perspectives; social and ethical aspects; and assistive technology for motor, cognitive, perceptual, and age-related impairments. Prior knowledge of one or more of the following areas useful: software; electronics; human-computer interaction; cognitive science; mechanical engineering; control; or MIT hobby shop, MIT PSC, or other relevant independent project experience. Enrollment may be limited.
Staff

HST.431[J] Infections and Inequalities: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Global Health
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 11.134[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines case studies in infectious disease outbreaks to demonstrate how human health is a product of multiple determinants, such as biology, sociocultural and historical factors, politics, economic processes, and the environment. Analyzes how structural inequalities render certain populations vulnerable to illness and explores the moral and ethical dimensions of public health and clinical interventions to promote health. Limited to 25.
Staff

HST.434 Evolution of an Epidemic (Study Abroad)
______

Undergrad (IAP)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-1 [P/D/F]
______
Examines the medical, scientific, public health and policy responses to a new disease, by focusing on the evolution of the AIDS epidemic. Begins with a review of how this new disease was first detected in the US and Africa, followed by the scientific basis as to how HIV causes profound dysfunction of the body's immune defense mechanisms, the rational development of drugs, the challenge of an HIV vaccine, and how public health and policy decisions have influenced the course of the global epidemic. Class conducted in Johannesburg Durban, South Africa. Open to all majors. Limited to 20. Application required; see class website for eligibility details.
H. Heller, B. Walker

HST.438[J] Viruses, Pandemics, and Immunity
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 5.002[J], 10.380[J])
(Subject meets with 5.003[J], 8.245[J], 10.382[J], HST.439[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-1
______
Covers the history of infectious diseases, basics of virology, immunology, and epidemiology, and ways in which diagnostic tests, vaccines, and antiviral therapies are currently designed and manufactured. Examines the origins of inequities in infection rates in society, and issues pertinent to vaccine safety. Final project explores how to create a more pandemic-resilient world. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first-year students. Preference to first-year students; all others should take HST.439.
A. Chakraborty

HST.439[J] Viruses, Pandemics, and Immunity
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 5.003[J], 8.245[J], 10.382[J])
(Subject meets with 5.002[J], 10.380[J], HST.438[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-1
______
Covers the history of infectious diseases, basics of virology, immunology, and epidemiology, and ways in which diagnostic tests, vaccines, and antiviral therapies are currently designed and manufactured. Examines the origins of inequities in infection rates in society, and issues pertinent to vaccine safety. Final project explores how to create a more pandemic-resilient world. HST.438 intended for first-year students; all others should take HST.439.
A. Chakraborty

HST.450[J] Biological Physics
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 8.593[J])
Prereq: 8.044 recommended but not necessary
Units: 4-0-8
______
Designed to provide seniors and first-year graduate students with a quantitative, analytical understanding of selected biological phenomena. Topics include experimental and theoretical basis for the phase boundaries and equation of state of concentrated protein solutions, with application to diseases such as sickle cell anemia and cataract. Protein-ligand binding and linkage and the theory of allosteric regulation of protein function, with application to proteins as stores as transporters in respiration, enzymes in metabolic pathways, membrane receptors, regulators of gene expression, and self-assembling scaffolds. The physics of locomotion and chemoreception in bacteria and the biophysics of vision, including the theory of transparency of the eye, molecular basis of photo reception, and the detection of light as a signal-to-noise discrimination.
Staff

HST.452[J] Statistical Physics in Biology
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 8.592[J])
Prereq: 8.333 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: TR9.30-11 (26-314)
______
A survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, phylogenetic trees. Physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, elements of protein folding. Considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. Collective behavior of biological elements; cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution.
M. Kardar
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

HST.460[J] Statistics for Neuroscience Research
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 9.073[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
A survey of statistical methods for neuroscience research. Core topics include introductions to the theory of point processes, the generalized linear model, Monte Carlo methods, Bayesian methods, multivariate methods, time-series analysis, spectral analysis and state-space modeling. Emphasis on developing a firm conceptual understanding of the statistical paradigm and statistical methods primarily through analyses of actual experimental data.
E. N. Brown

HST.482[J] Biomedical Signal and Image Processing
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Same subject as 6.8801[J])
(Subject meets with 6.8800[J], 16.456[J], HST.582[J])
Prereq: (6.3700 or permission of instructor) and (2.004, 6.3000, 16.002, or 18.085)
Units: 3-1-8
______
Fundamentals of digital signal processing with emphasis on problems in biomedical research and clinical medicine. Basic principles and algorithms for processing both deterministic and random signals. Topics include data acquisition, imaging, filtering, coding, feature extraction, and modeling. Lab projects, performed in MATLAB, provide practical experience in processing physiological data, with examples from cardiology, speech processing, and medical imaging. Lectures cover signal processing topics relevant to the lab exercises, as well as background on the biological signals processed in the labs. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

HST.500 Frontiers in (Bio)Medical Engineering and Physics
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides a framework for mapping research topics at the intersection of medicine and engineering/physics in the Harvard-MIT community and covers the different research areas in MEMP (for example, regenerative biomedical technologies, biomedical imaging and biooptics). Lectures provide fundamental concepts and consider what's hot, and why, in each area. Training in scientific proposal writing (thesis proposals, fellowship applications, or research grant applications) through writing workshops. Topics include how to structure a novel research project, how to position research within the scientific community, how to present preliminary data effectively, and how to give and respond to peer reviews.
S. Bhatia, D. Anderson

HST.504[J] Topics in Computational Molecular Biology
______

Graduate (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
(Same subject as 18.418[J])
Prereq: 6.8701, 18.417, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: MW11.30-1 (8-119)
______
Covers current research topics in computational molecular biology. Recent research papers presented from leading conferences such as the International Conference on Computational Molecular Biology (RECOMB) and the Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB). Topics include original research (both theoretical and experimental) in comparative genomics, sequence and structure analysis, molecular evolution, proteomics, gene expression, transcriptional regulation, biological networks, drug discovery, and privacy. Recent research by course participants also covered. Participants will be expected to present individual projects to the class.
B. Berger
No textbook information available

HST.506[J] Computational Systems Biology: Deep Learning in the Life Sciences
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 6.8710[J])
(Subject meets with 6.8711[J], 20.390[J], 20.490)
Prereq: Biology (GIR) and (6.3700 or 18.600)
Units: 3-0-9
______
Presents innovative approaches to computational problems in the life sciences, focusing on deep learning-based approaches with comparisons to conventional methods. Topics include protein-DNA interaction, chromatin accessibility, regulatory variant interpretation, medical image understanding, medical record understanding, therapeutic design, and experiment design (the choice and interpretation of interventions). Focuses on machine learning model selection, robustness, and interpretation. Teams complete a multidisciplinary final research project using TensorFlow or other framework. Provides a comprehensive introduction to each life sciences problem, but relies upon students understanding probabilistic problem formulations. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

HST.507[J] Advanced Computational Biology: Genomes, Networks, Evolution
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 6.8700[J])
(Subject meets with 6.8701)
Prereq: (Biology (GIR), 6.1210, and 6.3700) or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
Add to schedule Lecture: TR1-2.30 (32-144) Recitation: F3 (32-144)
______
See description for 6.8701. Additionally examines recent publications in the areas covered, with research-style assignments. A more substantial final project is expected, which can lead to a thesis and publication.
M. Kellis
No textbook information available

HST.508[J] Evolutionary and Quantitative Genomics
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 1.872[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Develops deep quantitative understanding of basic forces of evolution, molecular evolution, genetic variations and their dynamics in populations, genetics of complex phenotypes, and genome-wide association studies. Applies these foundational concepts to cutting-edge studies in epigenetics, gene regulation and chromatin; cancer genomics and microbiomes. Modules consist of lectures, journal club discussions of high-impact publications, and guest lectures that provide clinical correlates. Homework assignments and final projects develop practical experience and understanding of genomic data from evolutionary principles.
L. Mirny, T. Lieberman

HST.515[J] Aerospace Biomedical and Life Support Engineering
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 16.423[J], IDS.337[J])
Prereq: 16.06, 16.400, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Fundamentals of human performance, physiology, and life support impacting engineering design and aerospace systems. Topics include effects of gravity on the muscle, skeletal, cardiovascular, and neurovestibular systems; human/pilot modeling and human/machine design; flight experiment design; and life support engineering for extravehicular activity (EVA). Case studies of current research are presented. Assignments include a design project, quantitative homework sets, and quizzes emphasizing engineering and systems aspects.
L. Petersen

HST.518[J] Human Systems Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 16.453[J])
(Subject meets with 16.400)
Prereq: 6.3700, 16.09, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: TR9.30-11 (3-370)
______
Provides a fundamental understanding of human factors that must be taken into account in the design and engineering of complex aviation, space, and medical systems. Focuses primarily on derivation of human engineering design criteria from sensory, motor, and cognitive sources. Includes principles of displays, controls and ergonomics, manual control, the nature of human error, basic experimental design, and human-computer interaction in supervisory control settings. Students taking graduate version complete a research project with a final written report and oral presentation.
A.M. Liu
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

HST.522[J] Biomaterials: Tissue Interactions
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 2.79[J])
Prereq: (Biology (GIR), Chemistry (GIR), and Physics I (GIR)) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the development and implementation of biomaterials for the fabrication of medical devices/implants, including artificial organs and matrices for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Employs a conceptual model, the "unit cell process for analysis of the mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation of biomaterials/devices in various organs, including matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. Methodology of tissue and organ regeneration. Discusses methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions. Comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to case studies. Criteria for restoration of physiological function for tissues and organs.
I. V. Yannas, M. Spector

HST.523[J] Cell-Matrix Mechanics
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 2.785[J])
Prereq: (Biology (GIR), Chemistry (GIR), and 2.001) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Mechanical forces play a decisive role during development of tissues and organs, during remodeling following injury as well as in normal function. A stress field influences cell function primarily through deformation of the extracellular matrix to which cells are attached. Deformed cells express different biosynthetic activity relative to undeformed cells. The unit cell process paradigm combined with topics in connective tissue mechanics form the basis for discussions of several topics from cell biology, physiology, and medicine.
Staff

HST.524[J] Design of Medical Devices and Implants
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 2.782[J])
Prereq: (Biology (GIR), Chemistry (GIR), and Physics I (GIR)) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Solution of clinical problems by use of implants and other medical devices. Systematic use of cell-matrix control volumes. The role of stress analysis in the design process. Anatomic fit: shape and size of implants. Selection of biomaterials. Instrumentation for surgical implantation procedures. Preclinical testing for safety and efficacy: risk/benefit ratio assessment. Evaluation of clinical performance: design of clinical trials. Project materials drawn from orthopedic devices, soft tissue implants, artificial organs, and dental implants.
Staff

HST.525[J] Tumor Microenvironment and Immuno-Oncology: A Systems Biology Approach
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 10.548[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4
Add to schedule Lecture: M EVE (5-7 PM) (E25-117)
______
Provides theoretical background to analyze and synthesize the most up-to-date findings from both laboratory and clinical investigations into solid tumor pathophysiology. Covers different topics centered on the critical role that the tumor microenvironment plays in the growth, invasion, metastasis and treatment of solid tumors. Develops a systems-level, quantitative understanding of angiogenesis, extracellular matrix, metastatic process, delivery of drugs and immune cells, and response to conventional and novel therapies, including immunotherapies. Discussions provide critical comments on the challenges and the future opportunities in research on cancer and in establishment of novel therapeutic approaches and biomarkers to guide treatment.
R. K. Jain, L. Munn
No textbook information available

HST.526[J] Future Medicine: Drug Delivery, Therapeutics, and Diagnostics
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 10.643[J])
(Subject meets with 10.443)
Prereq: 5.12 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
Aims to describe the direction and future of medical technology. Introduces pharmaceutics, pharmacology, and conventional medical devices, then transitions to drug delivery systems, mechanical/electric-based and biological/cell-based therapies, and sensors. Covers nano- and micro drug delivery systems, including polymer-drug conjugates, protein therapeutics, liposomes and polymer nanoparticles, viral and non-viral genetic therapy, and tissue engineering. Previous coursework in cell biology and organic chemistry recommended. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 40.
Staff

HST.531 Medical Physics of Proton Radiation Therapy
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4
______
Acceleration of protons for radiation therapy; introduction into advanced techniques such as laser acceleration and dielectric wall acceleration. Topics include the interactions of protons with the patient, Monte Carlo simulation, and dose calculation methods; biological aspects of proton therapy, relative biological effectiveness (RBE), and the role of contaminating neutrons; treatment planning and treatment optimization methods, and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT); the effect of organ motion and its compensation by use of image-guided treatment techniques; general dosimetry and advanced in-vivo dosimetry methods, including PET/CT and prompt gamma measurements. Outlook into therapy with heavier ions. Includes practical demonstrations at the Proton Therapy Center of the Massachusetts General Hospital.
B. Winey, J. Schuemann

HST.533 Medical Imaging in Radiation Therapy
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 18.06
Units: 2-0-4
______
Introduces imaging concepts and applications used throughout radiation therapy workflows, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and computed tomography (CT). Advanced topics include proton imaging modalities, such as prompt gamma imaging and proton radiography/CT. Includes lectures regarding image reconstruction and image registration. Introduces students to open-source medical image computing software (3D Slicer, RTK, and Plastimatch). Includes imaging demonstrations at Massachusetts General Hospital.
B. Winey, J. Schuemann

HST.535[J] Tissue Engineering and Organ Regeneration
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.787[J])
Prereq: (Biology (GIR), Chemistry (GIR), and Physics I (GIR)) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: TR11-12.30 (5-134)
______
Principles and practice of tissue engineering (TE) and organ regeneration (OR). Topics include factors that prevent the spontaneous regeneration of tissues/organs in the adult (following traumatic injury, surgical excision, disease, and aging), and molecular and cell-biological mechanisms that can be harnessed for induced regeneration. Presents the basic science of organ regeneration. Principles underlying engineering strategies for employing select biomaterial scaffolds, exogenous cells, soluble regulators, and physical stimuli, for the formation of tissue in vitro (TE) and regeneration of tissues/organs in vivo (OR). Describes the technologies for producing biomaterial scaffolds and for incorporating cells and regulatory molecules into workable devices. Examples of clinical successes and failures of regenerative devices are analyzed as case studies.
M. Spector, I. V. Yannas
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

HST.537[J] Fluids and Diseases
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 1.631[J], 2.250[J])
(Subject meets with 1.063)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-3-6
______
Designed for students in engineering and the quantitative sciences who want to explore applications of mathematics, physics and fluid dynamics to infectious diseases and health; and for students in epidemiology, environmental health, ecology, medicine, and systems modeling seeking to understand physical and spatial modeling, and the role of fluid dynamics and physical constraints on infectious diseases and pathologies. The first part of the class reviews modeling in epidemiology and data collection, and highlights concepts of spatial modeling and heterogeneity. The remainder highlights multi-scale dynamics, the role of fluids and fluid dynamics in physiology, and pathology in a range of infectious diseases. The laboratory portion entails activities aimed at integrating applied learning with theoretical concepts discussed in lectures and covered in problem sets. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
L. Bourouiba

HST.538[J] Genomics and Evolution of Infectious Disease
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 1.881[J])
(Subject meets with 1.088)
Prereq: Biology (GIR) and (1.000 or 6.100B)
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides a thorough introduction to the forces driving infectious disease evolution, practical experience with bioinformatics and computational tools, and discussions of current topics relevant to public health. Topics include mechanisms of genome variation in bacteria and viruses, population genetics, outbreak detection and tracking, strategies to impede the evolution of drug resistance, emergence of new disease, and microbiomes and metagenomics. Discusses primary literature and computational assignments. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
T. Lieberman

HST.539[J] Advances in Interdisciplinary Science in Human Health and Disease
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 5.64[J])
Prereq: 5.13, 5.601, 5.602, and (5.07 or 7.05)
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces major principles, concepts, and clinical applications of biophysics, biophysical chemistry, and systems biology. Emphasizes biological macromolecular interactions, biochemical reaction dynamics, and genomics. Discusses current technological frontiers and areas of active research at the interface of basic and clinical science. Provides integrated, interdisciplinary training and core experimental and computational methods in molecular biochemistry and genomics.
A. Shalek, X. Wang

HST.540[J] Human Physiology
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 7.20[J])
Prereq: 7.05
Units: 5-0-7
______
Comprehensive exploration of human physiology, emphasizing the molecular basis and applied aspects of organ function and regulation in health and disease. Includes a review of cell structure and function, as well as the mechanisms by which the endocrine and nervous systems integrate cellular metabolism. Special emphasis on examining the cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and renal systems, as well as liver function, drug metabolism, and pharmacogenetics.
M. Krieger, O. Yilmaz

HST.541[J] Cellular Neurophysiology and Computing
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 2.794[J], 6.4812[J], 9.021[J], 20.470[J])
(Subject meets with 2.791[J], 6.4810[J], 9.21[J], 20.370[J])
Prereq: (Physics II (GIR), 18.03, and (2.005, 6.2000, 6.3000, 10.301, or 20.110)) or permission of instructor
Units: 5-2-5
______
Integrated overview of the biophysics of cells from prokaryotes to neurons, with a focus on mass transport and electrical signal generation across cell membrane. First third of course focuses on mass transport through membranes: diffusion, osmosis, chemically mediated, and active transport. Second third focuses on electrical properties of cells: ion transport to action potential generation and propagation in electrically excitable cells. Synaptic transmission. Electrical properties interpreted via kinetic and molecular properties of single voltage-gated ion channels. Final third focuses on biophysics of synaptic transmission and introduction to neural computing. Laboratory and computer exercises illustrate the concepts. Students taking graduate version complete different assignments.
Staff

HST.542[J] Quantitative and Clinical Physiology
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.792[J], 6.4820[J])
(Subject meets with 2.796[J], 6.4822[J])
Prereq: Physics II (GIR), 18.03, or permission of instructor
Units: 4-2-6
Add to schedule Lecture: TR9.30-11 (4-265) Recitation: W1 (34-301) or W2 (34-301)
______
Application of the principles of energy and mass flow to major human organ systems. Anatomical, physiological and clinical features of the cardiovascular, respiratory and renal systems. Mechanisms of regulation and homeostasis. Systems, features and devices that are most illuminated by the methods of physical sciences and engineering models. Required laboratory work includes animal studies. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
T. Heldt, R. G. Mark
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

HST.552[J] Medical Device Design
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 2.75[J], 6.4861[J])
(Subject meets with 2.750[J], 6.4860[J])
Prereq: 2.008, 6.2040, 6.2050, 6.2060, 22.071, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-3-6
______
Provides an intense project-based learning experience around the design of medical devices with foci ranging from mechanical to electro mechanical to electronics. Projects motivated by real-world clinical challenges provided by sponsors and clinicians who also help mentor teams. Covers the design process, project management, and fundamentals of mechanical and electrical circuit and sensor design. Students work in small teams to execute a substantial term project, with emphasis placed upon developing creative designs — via a deterministic design process — that are developed and optimized using analytical techniques. Includes mandatory lab. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication provided. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment limited.
A. H. Slocum, E. Roche, N. C. Hanumara, G. Traverso, A. Pennes

HST.560[J] Radiation Biophysics
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 22.55[J])
(Subject meets with 22.055)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides a background in sources of radiation with an emphasis on terrestrial and space environments and on industrial production. Discusses experimental approaches to evaluating biological effects resulting from irradiation regimes differing in radiation type, dose and dose-rate. Effects at the molecular, cellular, organism, and population level are examined. Literature is reviewed identifying gaps in our understanding of the health effects of radiation, and responses of regulatory bodies to these gaps is discussed. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

HST.562[J] Pioneering Technologies for Interrogating Complex Biological Systems
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 9.271[J], 10.562[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces pioneering technologies in biology and medicine and discusses their underlying biological/molecular/engineering principles. Topics include emerging sample processing technologies, advanced optical imaging modalities, and next-gen molecular phenotyping techniques. Provides practical experience with optical microscopy and 3D phenotyping techniques. Limited to 15.
K. Chung

HST.563 Imaging Biophysics and Clinical Applications
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: (8.03 and 18.03) or permission of instructor
Units: 2-1-9
______
Introduction to the connections and distinctions among various imaging modalities (x-ray, optical, ultrasound, MRI, PET, SPECT, EEG), common goals of biomedical imaging, broadly defined target of biomedical imaging, and the current practical and economic landscape of biomedical imaging research. Emphasis on applications of imaging research. Final project consists of student groups writing mock grant applications for biomedical imaging research project, modeled after an exploratory National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant application.
C. Catana, R. L. Barry

HST.565 Medical Imaging Sciences and Applications
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers biophysical, biomedical, mathematical and instrumentation basics of positron emission tomography (PET), x-ray and computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), optical Imaging and ultrasound. Topics include particles and photon interactions, nuclear counting statistics, gamma cameras, and computed tomography as it pertains to SPECT and PET (PET-CT, PET-MR, time-of-flight PET), MR physics and various sequences, optical and ultrasound physics foundations for imaging. Discusses clinical applications of PET and MR in molecular imaging of the brain, the heart, cancer and the role of AI in medical imaging. Includes medical demonstration lectures of SPECT, PET-CT and PET-MR imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital. Considers the ways imaging techniques are rooted in physics, engineering, and mathematics, and their respective role in anatomic and physiologic/molecular imaging.
HST Faculty

HST.576[J] Topics in Neural Signal Processing
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 9.272[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Presents signal processing and statistical methods used to study neural systems and analyze neurophysiological data. Topics include state-space modeling formulated using the Bayesian Chapman-Kolmogorov system, theory of point processes, EM algorithm, Bayesian and sequential Monte Carlo methods. Applications include dynamic analyses of neural encoding, neural spike train decoding, studies of neural receptive field plasticity, algorithms for neural prosthetic control, EEG and MEG source localization. Students should know introductory probability theory and statistics.
E. N. Brown

HST.580[J] Data Acquisition and Image Reconstruction in MRI
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 6.8810[J])
Prereq: 6.3010
Units: 3-0-9
______
Applies analysis of signals and noise in linear systems, sampling, and Fourier properties to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging acquisition and reconstruction. Provides adequate foundation for MR physics to enable study of RF excitation design, efficient Fourier sampling, parallel encoding, reconstruction of non-uniformly sampled data, and the impact of hardware imperfections on reconstruction performance. Surveys active areas of MR research. Assignments include Matlab-based work with real data. Includes visit to a scan site for human MR studies.
E. Adalsteinsson

HST.582[J] Biomedical Signal and Image Processing
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 6.8800[J], 16.456[J])
(Subject meets with 6.8801[J], HST.482[J])
Prereq: (6.3700 and (2.004, 6.3000, 16.002, or 18.085)) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-1-8
______
Fundamentals of digital signal processing with emphasis on problems in biomedical research and clinical medicine. Basic principles and algorithms for processing both deterministic and random signals. Topics include data acquisition, imaging, filtering, coding, feature extraction, and modeling. Lab projects, performed in MATLAB, provide practical experience in processing physiological data, with examples from cardiology, speech processing, and medical imaging. Lectures cover signal processing topics relevant to the lab exercises, as well as background on the biological signals processed in the labs. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

HST.583[J] Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 9.583[J])
Prereq: 18.05 and (18.06 or permission of instructor)
Units: 2-3-7
Add to schedule Lecture: MW3 (3-333) Lab: M12.30-2 (3-333) Recitation: W2 (3-333) +final
______
Provides background necessary for designing, conducting, and interpreting fMRI studies in the human brain. Covers in depth the physics of image encoding, mechanisms of anatomical and functional contrasts, the physiological basis of fMRI signals, cerebral hemodynamics, and neurovascular coupling. Also covers design methods for stimulus-, task-driven and resting-state experiments, as well as workflows for model-based and data-driven analysis methods for data. Instruction in brain structure analysis and surface- and region-based analyses. Laboratory sessions include data acquisition sessions at the 3 Tesla MRI scanner at MIT and the Connectom and 7 Tesla scanners at the MGH/HST Martinos Center, as well as hands-on data analysis workshops. Introductory or college-level neurobiology, physics, and signal processing are helpful.
J. Polimeni, A. Yendiki, J. Chen
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

HST.584[J] Magnetic Resonance Analytic, Biochemical, and Imaging Techniques
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 22.561[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-12
______
Introduction to basic NMR theory. Examples of biochemical data obtained using NMR summarized along with other related experiments. Detailed study of NMR imaging techniques includes discussions of basic cross-sectional image reconstruction, image contrast, flow and real-time imaging, and hardware design considerations. Exposure to laboratory NMR spectroscopic and imaging equipment included.
L. Wald, B. Bilgic

HST.590 Biomedical Engineering Seminar Series
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units: 1-0-0 [P/D/F]
Add to schedule Lecture: R EVE (4.30-6.30 PM) (E25-117)
______
Seminars focused on the development of professional skills for biomedical engineers and scientists. Each term focuses on a different topic, resulting in a repeating cycle that covers biomedical and research ethics, business and entrepreneurship, global health and biomedical innovation, and health systems and policy. Includes guest lectures, case studies, interactive small group discussions, and role-playing simulations.
Fall: E. Lindemer, M. Cotler
Spring: E. Lindemer, M. Cotler, J. Behrens
No textbook information available

HST.599 Research in Health Sciences and Technology
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
For students conducting pre-thesis research or lab rotations in HST, in cases where the assigned research is approved for academic credit by the department. Hours arranged with research advisor. Restricted to HST students.
T. Anderson
No textbook information available


left arrow | HST.00-HST.599 | HST.600-HST.999 plus UROP and Thesis | right arrow



Produced: 21-JUN-2024 05:10 PM