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Course 1: Civil and Environmental Engineering
IAP/Spring 2024


Materials and Structures

1.535 Mechanics of Materials
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 1.050 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-2-7
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Introduces the structure and properties of natural and manufactured building materials, including rheology elasticity, fracture mechanics, viscoelasticity and plasticity. Emphasizes effects of molecular and nanoscopic structure, and interactions on macroscopic material behavior. Focuses on design of natural and structural materials. Discusses material aspects of sustainable development. Presents principles of experimental characterization techniques. Explores microscopic and macroscopic mechanical approaches to characterize structure and properties of materials. In laboratory and in-field sessions, students design and implement experimental approaches to characterize natural and building materials and study their interaction with the environment. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

1.541 Mechanics and Design of Concrete Structures
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.054)
Prereq: 1.036 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: MW1-2.30 (1-246)
______
Studies strength and deformation of concrete under various states of stress; failure criteria; concrete plasticity; and fracture mechanics concepts. Topics include fundamental behavior of reinforced concrete structural systems and their members; basis for design and code constraints; high-performance concrete materials and their use in innovative design solutions; and yield line theory for slabs. Uses behavior models and nonlinear analysis. Covers complex systems, including bridge structures, concrete shells, and containments. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
O. Buyukozturk
No required or recommended textbooks

1.545 Atomistic Modeling and Simulation of Materials and Structures
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers multiscale atomistic modeling and simulation methods, with focus on mechanical properties (elasticity, plasticity, creep, fracture, fatigue) of a range of materials (metals, ceramics, proteins, biological materials, biomaterials). Topics include mechanics of materials (energy principles, nano-/micromechanics, deformation mechanisms, size effects, hierarchical biological structures) and atomistic modeling (chemistry, interatomic potentials, chemical reactivity and first-principles methods, visualization, data analysis, numerical methods, supercomputing, data-driven algorithms). Includes interactive computational projects and cloud-based computing. Part I – Basic atomistic and multiscale methods, Part II – Interatomic potentials, Part III – Mechanical properties at multiple scales, Part IV – Materiomics.
M. Buehler

1.550 Engineering Mechanics
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-2-7
______
Introduction to engineering mechanics, including dimensional analysis, stresses and strength, deformation and strain, elasticity and thermodynamics of reversible processes, energy bounds in linear elasticity, perspectives on elastic instability, fracture and yield design. Focus is on underlying physics laws (conservation of momentum, thermodynamic of reversible and irreversible processes) as applied to truss, beam, and continuum systems.
F. J. Ulm

1.562 Structural Design Project I
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Students work in teams to design a long-span structure, emphasizing conceptual design and advanced structural analysis. Subject covers structural systems and construction methods, interdisciplinary collaboration, design strategies for resistance to static and dynamic loading, and simplified calculation methods to validate numerical simulations. Emphasis on oral and visual communication of engineering concepts and students present their projects to leading engineers for feedback.
Staff

1.563 Structural Design Project II
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: W2-5 (1-273) +final
______
Students work in teams to design a tall building, emphasizing the design of vertical load systems, lateral load systems, and floor systems. Uses studies of precedent buildings and metrics of structural performance including material efficiency and embodied carbon to evaluate multiple design concepts. Simplified calculation methods are validated with advanced numerical simulations. Formal presentations will be used to improve oral and visual communication.
W. Baker/Petrov
No required or recommended textbooks

1.564[J] Environmental Technologies in Buildings
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 4.464[J])
(Subject meets with 4.401)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-2-4
______
Introduction to the study of the thermal and luminous behavior of buildings. Examines the basic scientific principles underlying these phenomena and introduces students to a range of technologies and analysis techniques for designing comfortable indoor environments. Challenges students to apply these techniques and explore the role energy and light can play in shaping architecture. Additional work required of students taking the graduate version.
C. Reinhart

1.573[J] Structural Mechanics
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.080[J])
Prereq: 2.002
Units: 4-0-8
______
Applies solid mechanics fundamentals to the analysis of marine, civil, and mechanical structures. Continuum concepts of stress, deformation, constitutive response and boundary conditions are reviewed in selected examples. The principle of virtual work guides mechanics modeling of slender structural components (e.g., beams; shafts; cables, frames; plates; shells), leading to appropriate simplifying assumptions. Introduction to elastic stability. Material limits to stress in design. Variational methods for computational structural mechanics analysis.
D. Parks

1.575[J] Computational Structural Design and Optimization
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 4.450[J])
(Subject meets with 4.451)
Prereq: ((1.000 or (6.100A and 6.100B)) and (1.050, 2.001, or 4.462)) or permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Research seminar focusing on emerging applications of computation for creative, early-stage structural design and optimization for architecture. Incorporates computational design fundamentals, including problem parameterization and formulation; design space exploration strategies, including interactive, heuristic, and gradient-based optimization; and computational structural analysis methods, including the finite element method, graphic statics, and approximation techniques. Programing experience and familiarity with structural mechanics necessary. Additional work required of students taking graduate version. Limited to 25 total for versions meeting together.
Consult C. Mueller

1.579 Materials in Agriculture, Food Security, and Food Safety
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Offers a unique perspective on the interplay between advanced materials, agriculture and food. Illustrates the impact that advanced materials-based innovation is imparting to four key areas of agriculture: management of plant diseases, mitigation of saline soil, enhancement of crop yield and productivity, and food safety and food security. Exposes students to engineering design concepts that are germane to biopolymer processing, functionalization and characterization, which will be coupled with hands-on activity in a lab setting. Students regenerate, process and functionalize biopolymers from raw to advanced materials, paving the way for the second part of the class, which centers around a proposed research project that aims at bringing materials-based innovation into agriculture.
B. Marelli

1.581[J] Structural Dynamics
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.060[J], 16.221[J])
(Subject meets with 1.058)
Prereq: 18.03 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-1-8
______
Examines response of structures to dynamic excitation: free vibration, harmonic loads, pulses and earthquakes. Covers systems of single- and multiple-degree-of-freedom, up to the continuum limit, by exact and approximate methods. Includes applications to buildings, ships, aircraft and offshore structures. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
T. Cohen

1.582 Design of Steel Structures
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides ability to design and assess steel structures. Steel structures are taught at three levels: the overall structural system (multi-story buildings, wide-span buildings, bridges, masts, and towers); the components of a structural system (floor systems, plate girders, frames, and beams); and the details of structural components (connection types, welding, and bolting). Each level includes a balance among theoretical analysis, design requirements, and construction/cost considerations. Existing structures are used as worked examples.
Staff

1.583 Topology Optimization of Structures
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers free-form topology design of structures using formal optimization methods and mathematical programs, including design of structural systems, mechanisms, and material architectures. Strong emphasis on designing with gradient-based optimizers, finite element methods, and design problems governed by structural mechanics. Incorporates optimization theory and computational mechanics fundamentals, problem formulation, sensitivity analysis; and introduces cutting-edge extensions, including to other and multiple physics. 
J. Carstensen

1.589 Studies in Structural Design and Analysis
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
TBA.
______
Individual study of advanced subjects under staff supervision. Content arranged to suit the particular requirements of the student and interested members of the staff.
Fall: Staff
Spring: O. Buyukozturk
Summer: O. Buyukozturk
No required or recommended textbooks

Hydrodynamics and Coastal Engineering

1.61 Transport Processes in the Environment
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 1.061)
Prereq: 1.060
Units: 3-1-8
Credit cannot also be received for 1.061A
______
Introduces mass transport in environmental flows, with emphasis on river and lake systems. Covers derivation and solutions to the differential form of mass conservation equations. Topics include molecular and turbulent diffusion, boundary layers, dissolution, bed-water exchange, air-water exchange, and particle transport. Meets with 1.061A first half of term. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
H. Nepf

1.63[J] Advanced Fluid Dynamics
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 2.26[J])
Prereq: 18.085 and (2.25 or permission of instructor)
Units: 4-0-8
______
Fundamentals of fluid dynamics intrinsic to natural physical phenomena and/or engineering processes. Discusses a range of topics and advanced problem-solving techniques. Sample topics include brief review of basic laws of fluid motion, scaling and approximations, creeping flows, boundary layers in high-speed flows, steady and transient, similarity method of solution, buoyancy-driven convection in porous media, dispersion in steady or oscillatory flows, physics and mathematics of linearized instability, effects of shear and stratification. In alternate years, two of the following modules will be offered: I: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics of Coastal Waters, II: Capillary Phenomena, III: Non-Newtonian Fluids, IV: Flagellar Swimming.
T. Akylas

1.631[J] Fluids and Diseases
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 2.250[J], HST.537[J])
(Subject meets with 1.063)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-3-6
Lecture: TR EVE (7-8.30 PM) (1-371)
______
Designed for students in engineering and the quantitative sciences who want to explore applications of mathematics, physics and fluid dynamics to infectious diseases and health; and for students in epidemiology, environmental health, ecology, medicine, and systems modeling seeking to understand physical and spatial modeling, and the role of fluid dynamics and physical constraints on infectious diseases and pathologies. The first part of the class reviews modeling in epidemiology and data collection, and highlights concepts of spatial modeling and heterogeneity. The remainder highlights multi-scale dynamics, the role of fluids and fluid dynamics in physiology, and pathology in a range of infectious diseases. The laboratory portion entails activities aimed at integrating applied learning with theoretical concepts discussed in lectures and covered in problem sets. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
L. Bourouiba
No required or recommended textbooks

1.65 Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flows and Wind Energy
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 1.060 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduction into the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and turbulence, which is critical to applications including renewable energy generation, pollution, weather and climate modeling, and more. Topics include the origins of wind in the atmosphere, an introduction to turbulent flows, the atmosphere and the diurnal cycle; momentum balance, scaling, and TKE; buoyancy, stability, and Coriolis forces; Ekman layer and RANS modeling; experimental methods; data analysis of ABL field measurements; and large eddy simulation.
M. Howland

1.66 Problems in Water Resources and Environmental Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
TBA.
______
Individual study in advanced topics as arranged between individual students and staff. Choice of subjects from theoretical, experimental, and practical phases of hydromechanics, hydraulic engineering, water resources, hydrology, and environmental engineering.
Fall: Staff
Spring: D. Entekhabi
Summer: D. Entekhabi
No required or recommended textbooks

1.670[J] Energy Systems for Climate Change Mitigation
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 10.621[J], IDS.521[J])
(Subject meets with 1.067[J], 10.421[J], IDS.065[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Reviews the contributions of energy systems to global greenhouse gas emissions, and the levers for reducing those emissions. Lectures and projects focus on evaluating energy systems against climate policy goals, using performance metrics such as cost, carbon intensity, and others. Student projects explore pathways for realizing emissions reduction scenarios. Projects address the climate change mitigation potential of energy technologies (hardware and software), technological and behavioral change trajectories, and technology and policy portfolios. Background in energy systems strongly recommended. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments and explore the subject in greater depth.
J. Trancik

1.685[J] Nonlinear Dynamics and Waves
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 2.034[J], 18.377[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR2.30-4 (3-333)
______
A unified treatment of nonlinear oscillations and wave phenomena with applications to mechanical, optical, geophysical, fluid, electrical and flow-structure interaction problems. Nonlinear free and forced vibrations; nonlinear resonances; self-excited oscillations; lock-in phenomena. Nonlinear dispersive and nondispersive waves; resonant wave interactions; propagation of wave pulses and nonlinear Schrodinger equation. Nonlinear long waves and breaking; theory of characteristics; the Korteweg-de Vries equation; solitons and solitary wave interactions. Stability of shear flows. Some topics and applications may vary from year to year.
T. Akylas
No required or recommended textbooks

1.686[J] Nonlinear Dynamics and Turbulence
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 2.033[J], 18.358[J])
(Subject meets with 1.068)
Prereq: 1.060A
Units: 3-2-7
______
Reviews theoretical notions of nonlinear dynamics, instabilities, and waves with applications in fluid dynamics. Discusses hydrodynamic instabilities leading to flow destabilization and transition to turbulence. Focuses on physical turbulence and mixing from homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Also covers topics such as rotating and stratified flows as they arise in the environment, wave-turbulence, and point source turbulent flows. Laboratory activities integrate theoretical concepts covered in lectures and problem sets. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
L. Bourouiba

1.69 Introduction to Coastal Engineering
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 1.061
Units: 4-0-8
______
Basic dynamics of ocean surface waves; wave-driven, wind-driven, and tidal currents; boundary layers and sediment transport; and selected engineering applications. Formulation of the boundary-value problem for surface waves, linear plane-wave solution, shoaling, refraction, diffraction, statistical representation, and elements of nonlinearity. Depth-averaged formulation and selected solutions for sea level and currents driven by waves, winds, and tides. Elements of boundary layers, initial sediment motion, and bedload and suspended sediment transport. Alongshore sediment transport and shoreline change. Emphasizes basic principles, mathematical formulation and solution, and physical interpretation, with selected applications and exposure to current research.
M. Scully

1.692[J] Seakeeping of Ships and Offshore Energy Systems
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 2.24[J])
Prereq: 2.20 and 18.085
Units: 4-0-8
______
Surface wave theory, conservation laws and boundary conditions, properties of regular surface waves and random ocean waves. Linearized theory of floating body dynamics, kinematic and dynamic free surface conditions, body boundary conditions. Simple harmonic motions. Diffraction and radiation problems, added mass and damping matrices. General reciprocity identities on diffraction and radiation. Ship wave resistance theory, Kelvin wake physics, ship seakeeping in regular and random waves. Discusses point wave energy absorbers, beam sea and head-sea devises, oscillating water column device and Well's turbine. Discusses offshore floating energy systems and their interaction with ambient waves, current and wind, including oil and gas platforms, liquefied natural gas (LNG) vessels and floating wind turbines. Homework drawn from real-world applications.
P. D. Sclavounos

1.699[J] Projects in Oceanographic Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
(Same subject as 2.689[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged [P/D/F]
TBA.
______
Projects in oceanographic engineering, carried out under supervision of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution staff. Given at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
Fall: M. Bittrich
Spring: M. Bittrich
Summer: M. Bittrich
No required or recommended textbooks

Hydrology and Water Resource Systems

1.713[J] Land-Atmosphere Interactions
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 12.834[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR EVE (4.30-6 PM) (48-308)
______
Topics include the exchange of mass, heat and momentum between the soil, vegetation or water surface and the overlying atmosphere; flux and transport in the turbulent boundary layer; and coupled balance of moisture and energy.
D. Entekhabi
No required or recommended textbooks

1.714 Surface Hydrology
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 1.070B or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers observations and theory of the physical processes involved in the hydrologic cycle. Processes considered are rainfall, infiltration, runoff generation, stream flow, evaporation, transpiration,and rainfall interception.
E. Eltahir

1.72 Groundwater Hydrology
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.072)
Prereq: 1.061
Units: 3-1-8
Lecture: MW10.30-12 (48-308)
______
Presents the fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. Topics include Darcy equation, flow nets, mass conservation, the aquifer flow equation, heterogeneity and anisotropy, storage properties, regional circulation, unsaturated flow, recharge, stream-aquifer interaction, well hydraulics, flow through fractured rock, numerical models, groundwater quality, contaminant transport processes, dispersion, decay, and adsorption. Includes laboratory and computer demonstrations. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
C. Harvey
No required or recommended textbooks

1.721 Advanced Subsurface Hydrology
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 1.72, 18.075, and permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Advanced treatment of solute transport in natural porous media with a focus on coupled chemical reaction and transport. Numerical modeling. Stochastic treatment of temporal and spatial variability. Mobile/immobile domain mass transfer, macrodispersion, tracer tests, salt water intrusion, heat transport.
C. Harvey

1.723 Computational Methods for Flow in Porous Media
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers physical, mathematical and simulation aspects of fluid flow and transport through porous media. Conservation equations for multiphase, multicomponent flow. Upscaling of parameters in heterogeneous fields. Modeling of viscous fingering and channeling. Numerical methods for elliptic equations: finite volume methods, multipoint flux approximations, mixed finite element methods, variational multiscale methods. Numerical methods for hyperbolic equations: low-order and high-order finite volume methods, streamline/front-tracking methods. Applications to groundwater contamination, oil and gas reservoir simulation, and geological CO2 sequestration, among others. Limited to graduate students.
R. Juanes

1.727 Surface Water Ecosystems: Biogeochemistry and Chemical Transport
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: (Chemistry (GIR), 1.018, and 1.060) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-1-8
______
Addresses the nature of lakes, wetlands, and related natural waters, with a focus on their ecology and cycling of nutrients and pollutants. Topics include the hydrology of surface water systems, the nature of aquatic plant and animal communities, the carbon and nitrogen cycles, the behavior and fate of toxic metals and anthropogenic organic compounds in natural waters, and linkages between lakes and the atmosphere, groundwater, and soil. Discusses practical topics in lake and river management. Students participate in field trips to broaden their understanding of these topics.
H. Hemond

1.731 Water Resource Systems
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 1.075)
Prereq: 1.070B or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Surveys optimization and simulation methods for management of water resources. Case studies illustrate linear, quadratic, nonlinear programming and real-time control. Applications include river basin planning, irrigation and agriculture, reservoir operations, capacity expansion, assimilation of remote sensing data, and sustainable resource development. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

1.74 Land, Water, Food, and Climate
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 1.077)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
______
Examines land, water, food, and climate in a changing world, with an emphasis on key scientific questions about the connections between natural resources and food production. Students read and discuss papers on a range of topics, including water and land resources, climate change, demography, agroecology, biotechnology, trade, and food security. Supporting information used for background and context includes data and analysis based on government reports, textbooks, and longer peer-reviewed documents not included in the readings. Provides a broad perspective on one of the defining global issues of this century. Students carry out exercises with relevant data sets, write critiques of key issues, and complete a focused term project. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
D. McLaughlin

Aquatic Sciences, Water Quality Control, and Environmental Management

1.76 Aquatic Chemistry
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Chemistry (GIR) or (5.601 and 5.602)
Units: 3-0-9
______
Quantitative treatment of chemical processes in aquatic systems such as lakes, oceans, rivers, estuaries, groundwaters, and wastewaters. A brief review of chemical thermodynamics is followed by discussion of acid-base, precipitation-dissolution, coordination, and reduction-oxidation reactions. Emphasis is on equilibrium calculations as a tool for understanding the variables that govern the chemical composition of aquatic systems and the fate of inorganic pollutants.
Staff

1.760 Carbon Management
(New)
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.076)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces the carbon cycle and "climate solutions." Provides specialized knowledge to manage and offset carbon emissions for government entities and large corporations through nature-based solutions and technology. Students prepare a mini-project simulating the assessment of practices and technologies for removing carbon dioxide from the air for a specific organization, which prepares them to become professionals with the skills to help evaluate and manage carbon emissions. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
C. Terrer

1.771 Global Change Science
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 1.071[J], 12.300[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces the basic principles and concepts in atmospheric physics, and climate dynamics, through an examination of: greenhouse gases emissions (mainly CO2), global warming, and regional climate change. Case studies are presented for the regional impacts of climate change on extreme weather, water availability, and disease transmission. This subject is an introduction to regional and global environmental problems for students in basic sciences and engineering. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
E. Eltahir

1.800 Environmental Chemistry
(New)
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.080)
Prereq: Chemistry (GIR)
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: MF1-2.30 (48-308)
______
Introduction to environmental chemistry, focusing on the fate of chemicals in both natural and engineered systems. Covers equilibrium reactions (e.g., partitioning, dissolution/precipitation, acid-base, redox, metal complexation), and kinetically-controlled reactions (e.g., photolysis, free radical oxidation). Specific environmental topics covered include heavy metals in natural waters, drinking water, and soils; biogeochemical cycles; radioactivity in the environment; smog formation; greenhouse gases and climate change; and engineering for the prevention and remediation of pollution. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff
No required or recommended textbooks

1.801[J] Environmental Law, Policy, and Economics: Pollution Prevention and Control
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as 11.021[J], 17.393[J], IDS.060[J])
(Subject meets with 1.811[J], 11.630[J], 15.663[J], IDS.540[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR3.30-5 (E51-057) +final
______
Analyzes federal and state regulation of air and water pollution, hazardous waste, greenhouse gas emissions, and production/use of toxic chemicals. Analyzes pollution/climate change as economic problems and failure of markets. Explores the role of science and economics in legal decisions. Emphasizes use of legal mechanisms and alternative approaches (i.e., economic incentives, voluntary approaches) to control pollution and encourage chemical accident and pollution prevention. Focuses on major federal legislation, underlying administrative system, and common law in analyzing environmental policy, economic consequences, and role of the courts. Discusses classical pollutants and toxic industrial chemicals, greenhouse gas emissions, community right-to-know, and environmental justice. Develops basic legal skills: how to read/understand cases, regulations, and statutes. Students taking graduate version explore the subject in greater depth.
N. Ashford, C. Caldart
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

1.802[J] Regulation of Chemicals, Radiation, and Biotechnology
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 11.022[J], IDS.061[J])
(Subject meets with 1.812[J], 10.805[J], 11.631[J], IDS.436[J], IDS.541[J])
Prereq: IDS.060 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on policy design and evaluation in the regulation of hazardous substances and processes. Includes risk assessment, industrial chemicals, pesticides, food contaminants, pharmaceuticals, radiation and radioactive wastes, product safety, workplace hazards, indoor air pollution, biotechnology, victims' compensation, and administrative law. Health and economic consequences of regulation, as well as its potential to spur technological change, are discussed for each regulatory regime. Students taking the graduate version are expected to explore the subject in greater depth.
Staff

1.811[J] Environmental Law, Policy, and Economics: Pollution Prevention and Control
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 11.630[J], 15.663[J], IDS.540[J])
(Subject meets with 1.801[J], 11.021[J], 17.393[J], IDS.060[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR3.30-5 (E51-057) +final
______
Analyzes federal and state regulation of air and water pollution, hazardous waste, greenhouse gas emissions, and production/use of toxic chemicals. Analyzes pollution/climate change as economic problems and failure of markets. Explores the role of science and economics in legal decisions. Emphasizes use of legal mechanisms and alternative approaches (i.e., economic incentives, voluntary approaches) to control pollution and encourage chemical accident and pollution prevention. Focuses on major federal legislation, underlying administrative system, and common law in analyzing environmental policy, economic consequences, and role of the courts. Discusses classical pollutants and toxic industrial chemicals, greenhouse gas emissions, community right-to-know, and environmental justice. Develops basic legal skills: how to read/understand cases, regulations, and statutes. Students taking graduate version explore the subject in greater depth.
N. Ashford, C. Caldart
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

1.812[J] Regulation of Chemicals, Radiation, and Biotechnology
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 11.631[J], IDS.541[J])
(Subject meets with 1.802[J], 10.805[J], 11.022[J], IDS.061[J], IDS.436[J])
Prereq: IDS.540 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on policy design and evaluation in the regulation of hazardous substances and processes. Includes risk assessment, industrial chemicals, pesticides, food contaminants, pharmaceuticals, radiation and radioactive wastes, product safety, workplace hazards, indoor air pollution, biotechnology, victims' compensation, and administrative law. Health and economic consequences of regulation, as well as its potential to spur technological change, are discussed for each regulator regime. Students taking the graduate version are expected to explore the subject in greater depth.
Staff

1.813[J] Technology, Globalization, and Sustainable Development
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 11.466[J], 15.657[J], IDS.437[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Investigates sustainable development, taking a broad view to include not only a healthy economic base, but also a sound environment, stable and rewarding employment, adequate purchasing power and earning capacity, distributional equity, national self-reliance, and maintenance of cultural integrity. Explores national, multinational, and international political and legal mechanisms to further sustainable development through transformation of the industrial state. Addresses the importance of technological innovation and the financial crisis of 2008 and the emergence of the Covid-19 pandemic, Russia's invasion of Ukraine, and inflation, as well as governmental interventions to reduce inequality.
N. Ashford

1.818[J] Sustainable Energy
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.65[J], 10.391[J], 11.371[J], 22.811[J])
(Subject meets with 2.650[J], 10.291[J], 22.081[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-1-8
______
Assessment of current and potential future energy systems. Covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting 21st-century regional and global energy needs in a sustainable manner. Examines various energy technologies in each fuel cycle stage for fossil (oil, gas, synthetic), nuclear (fission and fusion) and renewable (solar, biomass, wind, hydro, and geothermal) energy types, along with storage, transmission, and conservation issues. Emphasizes analysis of energy propositions within an engineering, economic and social context. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
M. Golay

1.83 Environmental Organic Chemistry
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 1.831)
Prereq: 5.601, 5.602, and 18.03
Units: 4-0-8
______
Focuses on the processes affecting organic compounds in the environment. Uses physical chemical properties to predict chemical transfers between environmental compartments (air, water, sediments, and biota). Uses molecular structure-reactivity relationships to estimate chemical, photochemical, and biochemical transformation rates. Resulting process models are combined to predict environmental concentrations (and related biological exposures) of anthropogenic and natural organic compounds.
P. Gschwend

1.831 Environmental Organic Chemistry
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 1.83)
Prereq: 5.601, 5.602, and 18.03
Units: 4-0-8
______
Focuses on the processes affecting organic compounds in the environment. Uses physical chemical properties to predict chemical transfers between environmental compartments (air, water, sediments, and biota). Uses molecular properties to estimate chemical, photochemical, and biochemical transformation rates. Resulting process models are combined to predict environmental concentrations (and related biological exposures) of anthropogenic and natural organic compounds.
P. Gschwend

1.834[J] Exploring Sustainability at Different Scales
(New)
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.834[J])
(Subject meets with 2.814)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Develops environmental accounting tools including energy, carbon, materials, land use, and possibly others, from small scales (e.g., products and processes) to larger scales, (e.g., companies, nations and global) to reveal how reoccurring human behavior patterns have dominated environmental outcomes. Involves visiting experts and readings in areas such as ethics, economics, governance, and development to frame core issues in human relationship to the environment and future societies. Explores how local actions, including engineering interventions and behavior change, play out at larger scales associated with the concept of sustainability, and how local actions may be modified to realize sustainability. Class is participatory and includes an exploratory project. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 25.
T. Gutowski

1.837 Resilience of Living Systems to Environmental Change
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Takes a multi-scale approach to understanding responses of living systems to perturbation. Mechanisms of stress sensing and response in plants, microbes, and animals from the level of individual cells to whole organisms. Emergent properties of organismal stress and population and community scale. Resilience of ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles to altered environmental conditions. Considers both natural and managed systems, focusing primarily on the terrestrial environment.
D. Des Marais

1.84[J] Atmospheric Chemistry
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 10.817[J], 12.807[J])
Prereq: 5.601 and 5.602
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides a detailed overview of the chemical transformations that control the abundances of key trace species in the Earth's atmosphere. Emphasizes the effects of human activity on air quality and climate. Topics include photochemistry, kinetics, and thermodynamics important to the chemistry of the atmosphere; stratospheric ozone depletion; oxidation chemistry of the troposphere; photochemical smog; aerosol chemistry; and sources and sinks of greenhouse gases and other climate forcers.
J. Kroll

1.841[J] Atmospheric Composition and Global Change
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 12.817[J])
Prereq: 1.84
Units: 3-0-9
______
Explores how atmospheric chemical composition both drives and responds to climate, with a particular focus on feedbacks via the biosphere. Topics include atmospheric nitrogen; DMS, sulfate, and CLAW; biogenic volatile organic compounds and secondary organic aerosol; wildfires and land use change; atmospheric methane and the oxidative capacity of the troposphere; and air quality and climate and geoengineering.
C. Heald

1.842[J] Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics and Chemistry
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 12.814[J])
(Subject meets with 12.338)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on understanding how aerosol particles form droplets or ice crystals during several atmospheric processes: determining Earth's radiative balance; heterogeneous chemistry and acid rain; understanding where, when and how much precipitation occurs. Provides tools for understanding the physics of aerosol and cloud element motion; the interaction of particles with water vapor, including phase changes and droplet and ice nucleation; the chemical composition of particles and the effect on cloud formation processes; and the effect of cloud processing on aerosol chemistry. Discusses relevant topics of contemporary interest, e.g., geoengineering and weather modification and volcanic effects. Students taking the graduate version complete different assignments.
Staff

1.845 Introduction to the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle and Ecosystem Ecology
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 1.010 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-2-7
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Introduces the terrestrial carbon cycle in a climate change context, with a focus on ecosystem ecology and biogeochemistry. Discussion-based seminars followed by practical classes to solve climate-related questions.
C. Terrer

1.850[J] Dimensions of Geoengineering
______

Graduate (Fall); first half of term
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 5.000[J], 10.600[J], 11.388[J], 12.884[J], 15.036[J], 16.645[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4
______
Familiarizes students with the potential contributions and risks of using geoengineering technologies to control climate damage from global warming caused by greenhouse gas emissions. Discusses geoengineering in relation to other climate change responses: reducing emissions, removing CO2 from the atmosphere, and adapting to the impacts of climate change. Limited to 100.
J. Deutch, M. Zuber

1.855 Air Pollution and Atmospheric Chemistry
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 1.085[J], 12.336[J])
Prereq: 18.03 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides a working knowledge of basic air quality issues, with emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach to investigating the sources and effects of pollution. Topics include emission sources; atmospheric chemistry and removal processes; meteorological phenomena and their impact on pollution transport at local to global scales; air pollution control technologies; health effects; and regulatory standards. Discusses regional and global issues, such as acid rain, ozone depletion and air quality connections to climate change. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Recommended for master's level graduate students.
C. Heald

1.86[J] Methods and Problems in Microbiology
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 7.492[J], 20.445[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Students will read and discuss primary literature covering key areas of microbial research with emphasis on methods and approaches used to understand and manipulate microbes. Preference to first-year Microbiology and Biology students.
M. Laub, Staff

1.861 Physics of Renewable Energy Systems and Computational Analysis
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.086)
Prereq: 1.060 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR3-4.30 (48-316)
______
Introduction to renewable energy generation in the context of the energy grid system. Focuses on computational analysis and modeling of energy systems. Topics include the energy grid and energy markets; fossil fuel generation; wind, solar, hydroelectric, and ocean energy; and energy storage. Tools, including computational models of wind energy generation and energy forecasting algorithms, introduced. Final project focuses on the development of low-carbon, low-cost energy systems. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
M. Howland
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

1.87[J] Microbial Genetics and Evolution
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 7.493[J], 12.493[J], 20.446[J])
Prereq: 7.03, 7.05, or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
______
Covers aspects of microbial genetic and genomic analyses, central dogma, horizontal gene transfer, and evolution.
A. D. Grossman, Staff

1.871 Computational Ecology
______

Graduate (IAP)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-7
______
Project-based class that provides practical experience in the analysis of community and population dynamics data. Emphasizes computational tools central to modern microbial ecology, such as agent-based simulations, and methods to infer ecological interactions and analyze ecological successions.
O. Cordero

1.873 Mathematical Modeling of Ecological Systems
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Calculus II (GIR)
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR10.30-12 (1-277)
______
Centers on explaining and discussing research on the different ecological dynamics emerging in 1-species, 2-species, and multi-species systems across environmental contexts. Builds on ecological theory from a systems perspective to provide quantitative methods to study the expected assembly and persistence patterns of ecological systems. Lectures address phenomenological and mechanistic understanding through graphical, analytical, and numerical analysis.
S. Saavedra
No required or recommended textbooks

1.881[J] Genomics and Evolution of Infectious Disease
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as HST.538[J])
(Subject meets with 1.088)
Prereq: Biology (GIR) and (1.000 or 6.100B)
Units: 3-0-9
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Provides a thorough introduction to the forces driving infectious disease evolution, practical experience with bioinformatics and computational tools, and discussions of current topics relevant to public health. Topics include mechanisms of genome variation in bacteria and viruses, population genetics, outbreak detection and tracking, strategies to impede the evolution of drug resistance, emergence of new disease, and microbiomes and metagenomics. Discusses primary literature and computational assignments. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
T. Lieberman

1.89 Environmental Microbial Biogeochemistry
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.089)
Prereq: Biology (GIR)
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR1.30-3 (48-316)
______
Provides a thorough introduction to biogeochemical cycling from the vantage point of microbial physiology. Emphasizes molecular mechanisms, experimental design and methodology, hypothesis testing, and applications. Topics include aerobic and anaerobic respiration, trace metals, secondary metabolites, redox, plant-microbe interactions, carbon storage, agriculture, and bioengineering. Formal lectures and in-depth discussions of foundational and contemporary primary literature. Students use knowledge of microbial metabolisms to develop final projects on applied solutions to problems in agriculture and biogeochemistry. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
D. McRose
No required or recommended textbooks

1.899 Career Reengineering Program and Professional Development Workshops
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 1-0-0 [P/D/F]
TBA.
______
For students in the 10-month Career Reengineering Program sponsored by the School of Engineering. Limited to CRP fellows.
M. Mccabe
No required or recommended textbooks

Special Studies

1.95[J] Teaching College-Level Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 5.95[J], 7.59[J], 8.395[J], 18.094[J])
(Subject meets with 2.978)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-2 [P/D/F]
______
Participatory seminar focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary for teaching science and engineering in higher education. Topics include theories of adult learning; course development; promoting active learning, problemsolving, and critical thinking in students; communicating with a diverse student body; using educational technology to further learning; lecturing; creating effective tests and assignments; and assessment and evaluation. Students research and present a relevant topic of particular interest. Appropriate for both novices and those with teaching experience.
J. Rankin

1.968 Graduate Studies in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
TBA.
______
Individual study, research, or laboratory investigations at the graduate level under faculty supervision.
Fall: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
IAP: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
Spring: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
Summer: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
No required or recommended textbooks

1.976 Graduate Professional Development Seminar
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4 [P/D/F]
______
Covers professional development topics and provides hands-on practice of these skills. Students participate in a series of written and oral communication workshops. Other topics include networking skills, work-life balance, mentoring, and career planning. Features an alumni panel showcasing a range of post-PhD careers. Limited to second-year graduate students in CEE.
C. Heald

1.977 Research Mentorship in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Graduate (IAP)
Prereq: None
Units: 0-3-0 [P/D/F]
______
Graduate students mentor an undergraduate student in research for 30 hours per week during the Independent Activities Period (IAP) to help create a self-contained project. Students introduce the project through selected readings and meetings that clearly explain how the undergraduate project fits within the scope of the larger work/research of the graduate student, meet regularly to discuss progress on the project, provide guidance in the creation of a poster presentation that the undergraduate will deliver at the end of IAP, and attend and provide written feedback on the presentations of all mini-UROP participants.
S. Smith
No required or recommended textbooks

1.982 Research in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
TBA.
______
For research assistants in the department, when assigned research is not used for thesis but is approved for academic credit. Credit for this subject may not be used for any degree granted by Course 1.
Fall: S. Smith
Spring: S. Smith
Summer: S. Smith
No required or recommended textbooks

1.984 Teaching Experience in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 0-3-0
TBA.
______
Provides classroom teaching experience under the supervision of faculty member(s). Students prepare instructional material, deliver lectures, grade assignments, and prepare a teaching portfolio to be submitted at the end of term. Students must send the subject title and the name of the lead instructor for the subject to the 1.984 instructor during or prior to the first week of the semester. Enrollment limited by availability of suitable teaching assignments.
Fall: H. Nepf
Spring: H. Nepf
No required or recommended textbooks

1.997 Practicum Training in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
TBA.
______
For graduate CEE students participating in curriculum-related, off-campus experiences in civil, environmental, and transportation engineering or related areas. Before enrolling, students must verify the internship arrangements by submitting a memo or email from the sponsoring company or organization and also from their Academic Advisor. At the conclusion of the training, the students will submit a final report for review and approval by their Academic Advisor. Can be taken for up to 3 units. Prior to enrolling, contact the CEE Academic Programs Office for procedures and restrictions.
Fall: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
IAP: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
Spring: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
Summer: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
No required or recommended textbooks

1.998 Practicum Training in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
TBA.
______
For undergraduate CEE students participating in curriculum-related off-campus experiences in civil and environmental engineering or related areas. Before enrolling, students must have an offer from a company or organization and must have prior approval from their CEE academic advisor. At the conclusion of the training, the students will submit a final report for review and approval by their Academic Advisor. Can be taken for up to 3 units. Prior to enrolling, contact the CEE Academic Programs Office for procedures and restrictions.
Fall: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
IAP: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
Spring: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
Summer: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
No required or recommended textbooks

1.999 Undergraduate Studies in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
TBA.
______
Individual study, research, or laboratory investigations under faculty supervision.
Fall: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
IAP: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
Spring: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
Summer: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
No required or recommended textbooks

1.C01 Machine Learning for Sustainable Systems
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.C51)
Prereq: (1.000 and 1.010) or permission of instructor; Coreq: 6.C01
Units: 1-1-4
Credit cannot also be received for 2.C01, 2.C51, 3.C01, 3.C51, 7.C01, 7.C51, 10.C01, 10.C51, 20.C01, 20.C51, 22.C01, 22.C51, SCM.C51
Lecture: F11 (1-390) Lab: F12 (1-390)
______
Building on core material in 6.C01, emphasizes the design and operation of sustainable systems. Illustrates how to leverage heterogeneous data from urban services, cities, and the environment, and apply machine learning methods to evaluate and/or improve sustainability solutions. Provides case studies from various domains, such as transportation and urban mobility, energy and water resources, environmental monitoring, infrastructure sensing and control, climate adaptation, and disaster resilience. Projects focus on using machine learning to identify new insights or decisions that can help engineer sustainability in societal-scale systems. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Students cannot receive credit without simultaneous completion of the core subject 6.C01.
S. Amin
No required or recommended textbooks

1.C25[J] Real World Computation with Julia
(New)
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 6.C25[J], 12.C25[J], 16.C25[J], 18.C25[J], 22.C25[J])
Prereq: 6.100A, 18.03, and 18.06
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on algorithms and techniques for writing and using modern technical software in a job, lab, or research group environment that may consist of interdisciplinary teams, where performance may be critical, and where the software needs to be flexible and adaptable. Topics include automatic differentiation, matrix calculus, scientific machine learning, parallel and GPU computing, and performance optimization with introductory applications to climate science, economics, agent-based modeling, and other areas. Labs and projects focus on performant, readable, composable algorithms, and software. Programming will be in Julia. Expects students to have some familiarity with Python, Matlab, or R. No Julia experience necessary.
A. Edelman, R. Ferrari, B. Forget, C. Leiseron,Y. Marzouk, J. Williams

1.C51 Machine Learning for Sustainable Systems
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 1.C01)
Prereq: (6.3700 and 18.06) or permission of instructor; Coreq: 6.C51
Units: 1-1-4
Credit cannot also be received for 2.C01, 2.C51, 3.C01, 3.C51, 7.C01, 7.C51, 10.C01, 10.C51, 20.C01, 20.C51, 22.C01, 22.C51, SCM.C51
Lecture: F11 (1-390) Lab: F12 (1-390)
______
Building on core material in 6.C51, emphasizes the design and operation of sustainable systems. Students learn to leverage heterogeneous data from urban services, cities, and the environment, and apply machine learning methods to evaluate and/or improve sustainability solutions. Provides case studies from various domains, such as transportation and mobility, energy and water resources, environment monitoring, infrastructure sensing and control, climate adaptation, and disaster resilience. Projects focus on using machine learning to identify new insights or decisions to help engineer sustainability in societal-scale systems. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Students cannot receive credit without simultaneous completion of the core subject 6.C51.
S. Amin
No required or recommended textbooks

1.EPE UPOP Engineering Practice Experience
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 1.EPE, 2.EPE, 3.EPE, 6.EPE, 8.EPE, 10.EPE, 15.EPE, 16.EPE, 20.EPE, 22.EPE)
Prereq: None
Units: 0-0-1 [P/D/F]
Lecture: TBA
______
Provides students with skills to prepare for and excel in the world of industry. Emphasizes practical application of career theory and professional development concepts. Introduces students to relevant and timely resources for career development, provides students with tools to embark on a successful internship search, and offers networking opportunities with employers and MIT alumni. Students work in groups, led by industry mentors, to improve their resumes and cover letters, interviewing skills, networking abilities, project management, and ability to give and receive feedback. Objective is for students to be able to adapt and contribute effectively to their future employment organizations. A total of two units of credit is awarded for completion of the fall and subsequent spring term offerings. Application required; consult UPOP website for more information.
Fall: D. Fordell, C. Greaney
Spring: D. Fordell, C. Greaney
No required or recommended textbooks

1.EPW UPOP Engineering Practice Workshop
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring)
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 1.EPW, 2.EPW, 3.EPW, 6.EPW, 10.EPW, 16.EPW, 20.EPW, 22.EPW)
Prereq: 2.EPE
Units: 1-0-0 [P/D/F]
TBA.
______
Provides sophomores across all majors with opportunities to develop and practice communication, teamwork, and problem-solving skills to become successful professionals in the workplace, particularly in preparation for their summer industry internship. This immersive, multi-day Team Training Workshop (TTW) is comprised of experiential learning modules focused on expanding skills in areas that employers report being most valuable in the workplace. Modules are led by MIT faculty with the help of MIT alumni and other senior industry professionals. Skills applied through creative simulations, team problem-solving challenges, oral presentations, and networking sessions with prospective employers. Enrollment limited to those in the UPOP program.
IAP: C. Greaney
Spring: C. Greaney
No required or recommended textbooks

1.THG Graduate Thesis
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
TBA.
______
Program of research leading to the writing of an SM, MEng, CE, PhD, or ScD thesis; to be arranged by the student and an appropriate MIT faculty member.
Fall: S. Smith
IAP: S. Smith
Spring: S. Smith
Summer: S. Smith
No required or recommended textbooks

1.THU Undergraduate Thesis
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
TBA.
______
Program of research leading to the writing of an S.B. thesis; to be arranged by the student and an appropriate MIT faculty member. Intended for seniors. Student must submit an approved thesis proposal to the Academic Programs Office by the fifth week of the first term the student is registered for thesis.
Fall: S. Smith
IAP: S. Smith
Spring: S. Smith
Summer: S. Smith
No required or recommended textbooks

1.UAR[J] Climate and Sustainability Undergraduate Advanced Research
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
(Same subject as 3.UAR[J], 5.UAR[J], 11.UAR[J], 12.UAR[J], 15.UAR[J], 22.UAR[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
Lecture: TR4 (32-144)
______
Provides instruction in effective research, experiential projects, internships, and externships, including choosing and refining problems, surveying previous work and publications, industry best practices, design for robustness, technical presentation, authorship and collaboration, and ethics. Supporting content includes background and context pertaining to climate change and sustainability, as well as tools for sustainable design. Focus for project work includes research topics relevant to the MIT Climate & Sustainability Consortium (MCSC). Students engage in extensive written and oral communication exercises, in the context of an approved advanced research project. A total of 12 units of credit is awarded for completion of the spring and subsequent fall term offerings. Application required; consult MCSC website for more information.
Fall: E. Olivetti, J. Grossman
Spring: E. Olivetti, J. Grossman
No required or recommended textbooks

1.UR Research in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
TBA.
______
Individual research or laboratory study under faculty supervision. Also, opportunities in ongoing research program. Limited number of funded traineeships available.
Fall: S. Smith
IAP: S. Smith
Spring: S. Smith
Summer: S. Smith
No required or recommended textbooks

1.URG Research in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
TBA.
______
Individual research or laboratory study under faculty supervision. Also opportunities in ongoing research program.
Fall: S. Smith
IAP: S. Smith
Spring: S. Smith
Summer: S. Smith
No required or recommended textbooks

1.S82 Special Problems in Environmental Microbiology and Chemistry
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged [P/D/F]
______
Advanced study of topics not covered in the regular subject listings, particularly seminar, laboratory, and experimental subjects offered by permanent or visiting faculty. Addresses topics in environmental microbiology, ecological genomics, microbial evolution and population genetics, oceanography, biogeochemical processes, environmental organic chemistry and aquatic chemistry.
Staff

1.S977 Special Graduate Subject in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Graduate (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Lecture: W2-3.30 (48-308)
______
Graduate subjects taught experimentally; subjects offered by visiting faculty; and seminars on topics of current interest not included in the regular curriculum.
Kroll, Jesse
No required or recommended textbooks

1.S978 Special Graduate Subject in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged [P/D/F]
______
Graduate subjects taught experimentally; subjects offered by visiting faculty; and seminars on topics of current interest not included in the regular curriculum. 1.978 is taught P/D/F.
Department Academic Programs Office

1.S979 Special Graduate Subject in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Graduate subjects taught experimentally; subjects offered by visiting faculty; and seminars on topics of current interest not included in the regular curriculum.
Staff

1.S980 Special Graduate Subject in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Lecture: MW3.30-5 (48-316)
______
Graduate subjects taught experimentally; subjects offered by visiting faculty; and seminars on topics of current interest not included in the the regular curriculum.
Fall: Staff
Spring: C. Harvey
No required or recommended textbooks

1.S981 Special Graduate Subject in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Graduate subjects taught experimentally; subjects offered by visiting faculty; and seminars on topics of current interest not included in the the regular curriculum.
F. Ulm

1.S982 Special Graduate Subject in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring); second half of term
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Graduate subjects taught experimentally; subjects offered by visiting faculty; and seminars on topics of current interest not included in the the regular curriculum.
Fall: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
IAP: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
Spring: Consult Department Academic Programs Office

1.S991 Special Undergraduate Subject in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Subjects taught experimentally; subjects offered by visiting faculty; and seminars on topics of current interest not included in the regular curriculum.
Fall: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
Spring: Consult Department Academic Programs Office

1.S992 Special Undergraduate Subject in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Lecture: MW3.30-5 (48-316)
______
Subjects taught experimentally; subjects offered by visiting faculty; and seminars on topics of current interest not included in the regular curriculum.
Fall: Consult Department Academic Programs Office
Spring: C. Harvey
No required or recommended textbooks

1.S993 Special Undergraduate Subject in Civil and Environmental Engineering
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Subjects taught experimentally; subjects offered by visiting faculty; and seminars on topics of current interest not included in the regular curriculum.
Consult Department Academic Programs Office


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