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Course 11: Urban Studies and Planning
IAP/Spring 2024


Introductory Subjects

11.001[J] Introduction to Urban Design and Development
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) HASS Humanities
(Same subject as 4.250[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: MW11-12.30 (4-370)
______
Examines the evolving structure of cities and the way that cities, suburbs, and metropolitan areas can be designed and developed. Surveys the ideas of a wide range of people who have addressed urban problems. Stresses the connection between values and design. Demonstrates how physical, social, political and economic forces interact to shape and reshape cities over time. Introduces links between urban design and urban science.
Fall: L. Vale (fall); A. Sevtsuk (spring)
Spring: L. Vale (fall); A. Sevtsuk (spring)
No textbook information available

11.002[J] Making Public Policy
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences Communication Intensive HASS
(Same subject as 17.30[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 4-0-8
______
Examines how the struggle among competing advocates shapes the outputs of government. Considers how conditions become problems for government to solve, why some political arguments are more persuasive than others, why some policy tools are preferred over others, and whether policies achieve their goals. Investigates the interactions among elected officials, think tanks, interest groups, the media, and the public in controversies over global warming, urban sprawl, Social Security, health care, education, and other issues.
K. Crockett

11.003[J] Methods of Policy Analysis
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as 17.303[J])
Prereq: 11.002; Coreq: 14.01
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides students with an introduction to public policy analysis. Examines various approaches to policy analysis by considering the concepts, tools, and methods used in economics, political science, and other disciplines. Students apply and critique these approaches through case studies of current public policy problems.
C. Abbanat

11.004[J] People and the Planet: Environmental Histories and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Elective
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as STS.033[J])
(Subject meets with 11.204[J], IDS.524[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-3-6
______
Explores historical and cultural aspects of complex environmental problems and engineering approaches to sustainable solutions. Introduces quantitative analyses and methodological tools to understand environmental issues that have human and natural components. Demonstrates concepts through a series of historical and cultural analyses of environmental challenges and their engineering responses. Builds writing, quantitative modeling, and analytical skills in assessing environmental systems problems and developing engineering solutions. Through environmental data gathering and analysis, students engage with the challenges and possibilities of engineering in complex, interacting systems, and investigate plausible, symbiotic, systems-oriented solutions. Students taking graduate version complete additional analysis of reading assignments and a more in-depth and longer final paper. 
Staff

11.005 Introduction to International Development
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR2.30-4 (5-234)
______
Introduces the political economy of international economic development planning, using an applied, quantitative approach. Considers why some countries are able to develop faster than others. Presents major theories and models of development and underdevelopment, providing tools to understand the mechanisms and processes behind economic growth and broader notions of progress. Offers an alternative view of development, focusing on the persistence of dichotomies in current theory and practice. Using specific cases, explores how different combinations of actors and institutions at various scales may promote or inhibit economic development. Students re-examine conventional knowledge and engage critically with the assumptions behind current thinking and policy.
M. Penumaka
No textbook information available

11.006 Poverty and Economic Security
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
(Subject meets with 11.206)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Explores the evolution of poverty and economic security in the US within a global context. Examines the impacts of recent economic restructuring and globalization. Reviews current debates about the fate of the middle class, sources of increasing inequality, and approaches to advancing economic opportunity and security. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
A. Glasmeier

11.007 Urban and Environmental Technology Implementation Lab
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-2-8
______
Real-world clients and environmental problems form the basis of a project in which teams of students develop strategies for analysis and implementation of new sensor technology within cities. Working closely with a partner or client based on the MIT campus or in Cambridge, students assess the environmental problem, implement prototypes, and recommend promising solutions to the client for implementation. Equipment and working space provided. Limited to 12.
D. Hsu

11.008 Undergraduate Planning Seminar
(New)
______

Undergrad (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4 [P/D/F]
______
A weekly seminar that includes discussions on topics in cities and urban planning, including guest lectures from DUSP faculty and practicing planners. Topics include urban science, zoning, architecture and urban design, urban sociology, politics and public policy, transportation and mobility, democratic governance, civil rights and social justice, urban economics, affordable housing, environmental policy and planning, real estate and economic development, agriculture and food policy, public health, and international development. Weekly student presentations on local planning issues and current events; occasional walking tours or arranged field trips. May be repeated for credit. Enrollment may be limited; preference to Course 11 and 11-6 sophomores and juniors.
E. Glenn

11.011 The Art and Science of Negotiation
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduction to negotiation theory and practice. Applications in government, business, and nonprofit settings are examined. Combines a "hands-on" personal skill-building orientation with a look at pertinent tactical and strategic foundations. Preparation insights, persuasion tools, ethical benchmarks, and institutional influences are examined as they shape our ability to analyze problems, negotiate agreements, and resolve disputes in social, organizational, and political circumstances characterized by interdependent interests. Enrollment limited by lottery; consult class website for information and deadlines.
B. Verdini

11.013[J] American Urban History
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring) HASS Humanities Communication Intensive HASS
(Same subject as 21H.217[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-7
______
Seminar on the history of institutions and institutional change in American cities from roughly 1850 to the present. Among the institutions to be looked at are political machines, police departments, courts, schools, prisons, public authorities, and universities. Focuses on readings and discussions.
Staff

11.014[J] History of the Built Environment in the US
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Humanities Communication Intensive HASS
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 21H.218[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-7
______
Seminar on the history of selected features of the physical environment of urban America. Among the features considered are parks, cemeteries, tenements, suburbs, zoos, skyscrapers, department stores, supermarkets, and amusement parks.
Staff

11.015[J] Riots, Strikes, and Conspiracies in American History
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Humanities Communication Intensive HASS
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 21H.226[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on a series of short, complicated, traumatic events that shed light on American politics, culture, and society. Events studied may include the rendition of Anthony Burns in 1854, the most famous fugitive slave controversy in US history; the Homestead strike/lockout of 1892; the quiz show scandal of the 1950s; and the student uprisings at Columbia University in 1968. Emphasis on finding ways to make sense of these events and on using them to understand larger processes of change in American history.
Staff

11.016[J] The Once and Future City
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Humanities Communication Intensive HASS
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 4.211[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines the evolving structure of cities, the dynamic processes that shape them, and the significance of a city's history for its future development. Develops the ability to read urban form as an interplay of natural processes and human purposes over time. Field assignments in Boston provide the opportunity to use, develop, and refine these concepts. Enrollment limited.
A. Spirn

11.021[J] Environmental Law, Policy, and Economics: Pollution Prevention and Control
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as 1.801[J], 17.393[J], IDS.060[J])
(Subject meets with 1.811[J], 11.630[J], 15.663[J], IDS.540[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR3.30-5 (E51-057) +final
______
Analyzes federal and state regulation of air and water pollution, hazardous waste, greenhouse gas emissions, and production/use of toxic chemicals. Analyzes pollution/climate change as economic problems and failure of markets. Explores the role of science and economics in legal decisions. Emphasizes use of legal mechanisms and alternative approaches (i.e., economic incentives, voluntary approaches) to control pollution and encourage chemical accident and pollution prevention. Focuses on major federal legislation, underlying administrative system, and common law in analyzing environmental policy, economic consequences, and role of the courts. Discusses classical pollutants and toxic industrial chemicals, greenhouse gas emissions, community right-to-know, and environmental justice. Develops basic legal skills: how to read/understand cases, regulations, and statutes. Students taking graduate version explore the subject in greater depth.
N. Ashford, C. Caldart
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

11.022[J] Regulation of Chemicals, Radiation, and Biotechnology
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 1.802[J], IDS.061[J])
(Subject meets with 1.812[J], 10.805[J], 11.631[J], IDS.436[J], IDS.541[J])
Prereq: IDS.060 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on policy design and evaluation in the regulation of hazardous substances and processes. Includes risk assessment, industrial chemicals, pesticides, food contaminants, pharmaceuticals, radiation and radioactive wastes, product safety, workplace hazards, indoor air pollution, biotechnology, victims' compensation, and administrative law. Health and economic consequences of regulation, as well as its potential to spur technological change, are discussed for each regulatory regime. Students taking the graduate version are expected to explore the subject in greater depth.
Staff

11.024 Modeling Pedestrian Activity in Cities
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 11.324)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR2-3.30 (10-401)
______
Investigates the interaction between pedestrian activity, urban form, and land-use patterns in relatively dense urban environments. Informed by recent literature on pedestrian mobility, behavior, and biases, subject takes a practical approach, using software tools and analysis methods to operationalize and model pedestrian activity. Uses simplified yet powerful and scalable network analysis methods that focus uniquely on pedestrians, rather than engaging in comprehensive travel demand modeling across all modes. Emphasizes not only modeling or predicting pedestrian activity in given built settings, but also analyzing and understanding how changes in the built environment — land use changes, density changes, and connectivity changes — can affect pedestrian activity. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
A. Sevtsuk
No textbook information available

11.025[J] D-Lab: Development
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as EC.701[J])
(Subject meets with 11.472[J], EC.781[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-2-7
______
Issues in international development, appropriate technology and project implementation addressed through lectures, case studies, guest speakers and laboratory exercises. Students form project teams to partner with community organizations in developing countries, and formulate plans for an optional IAP site visit. (Previous field sites include Ghana, Brazil, Honduras and India.) Recitation sections focus on specific project implementation, and include cultural, social, political, environmental and economic overviews of the target countries as well as an introduction to the local languages. Enrollment limited by lottery; must attend first class session.
S. L. Hsu, B. Sanyal

11.026[J] Downtown
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Humanities
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 21H.321[J])
(Subject meets with 11.339)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-7
______
Seminar on downtown in US cities from the late 19th century to the late 20th. Emphasis on downtown as an idea, place, and cluster of interests, on the changing character of downtown, and on recent efforts to rebuild it. Considers subways, skyscrapers, highways, urban renewal, and retail centers. Focus on readings, discussions, and individual research projects. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

11.027 City to City: Comparing, Researching, and Reflecting on Practice
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR3.30-5 (9-217)
______
Introduces students to practice through researching, writing, and working for and with nonprofits. Students work directly with nonprofits and community partners to help find solutions to real world problems; interview planners and other field experts, and write and present findings to nonprofit partners and community audiences.
C. Abbanat
No textbook information available

11.029[J] Mobility Ventures: Driving Innovation in Transportation Systems
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 15.3791[J])
(Subject meets with 11.529[J], 15.379[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-3-6
______
Explores technological, behavioral, policy, and systems-wide frameworks for innovation in transportation systems, complemented with case studies across the mobility spectrum, from autonomous vehicles to urban air mobility to last-mile sidewalk robots. Students interact with a series of guest lecturers from CEOs and other business and government executives who are actively reshaping the future of mobility. Interdisciplinary teams of students collaborate to deliver business plans for proposed mobility-focused startups with an emphasis on primary market research. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Preference to juniors and seniors.
J. Zhao, J. Moavenzadeh, J. Larios Berlin

11.041 Introduction to Housing, Community, and Economic Development
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
(Subject meets with 11.401)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides a critical introduction to the shape and determinants of political, social, and economic inequality in America, with a focus on racial and economic justice. Explores the role of the city in visions of justice. Analyzes the historical, political, and institutional contexts of housing and community development policy in the US, including federalism, municipal fragmentation, and decentralized public financing. Introduces major dimensions in US housing policy, such as housing finance, public housing policy, and state and local housing affordability mechanisms. Reviews major themes in community economic development, including drivers of economic inequality, small business policy, employment policy, and cooperative economics. Expectations and evaluation criteria differ for students taking graduate version.
J. Phil Thompson, Holly Harriel

11.045[J] Power: Interpersonal, Organizational, and Global Dimensions
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as 15.302[J], 17.045[J], 21A.127[J])
(Subject meets with 21A.129)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
The study of power among individuals and within organizations, markets, and states. Using examples from anthropology and sociology alongside classical and contemporary social theory, explores the nature of dominant and subordinate relationships, types of legitimate authority, and practices of resistance. Examines how people are influenced in subtle ways by those around them, who makes controlling decisions in the family, how people get ahead at work, and whether democracies, in fact, reflect the will of the people. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
S. Silbey

11.067 Land Use Law and Politics: Race, Place, and Law
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
(Subject meets with 11.367)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Explores conceptions of spatial justice and introduces students to basic principles of US law and legal analysis, focused on property, land use, equal protection, civil rights, fair housing, and local government law, in order to examine who should control how land is used. Examines the rights of owners of land and the types of regulatory and market-based tools that are available to control land use, and discusses why and when government regulation, rather than private market ordering, might be necessary to control land use patterns. Explores basic principles of civil rights and anti-discrimination law and focuses on particular civil rights problems associated with the land use regulatory system, such as exclusionary zoning, residential segregation, the fair distribution of undesirable land uses, and gentrification. Introduces basic skills of statutory drafting and interpretation. Assignments differ for those taking the graduate version.
Staff

11.074 Cybersecurity Clinic
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
(Subject meets with 11.274)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-4-6
Lecture: F10-12 (9-450A)
______
Provides an opportunity for MIT students to become certified in methods of assessing the vulnerability of public agencies (particularly agencies that manage critical urban infrastructure) to the risk of cyberattack. Certification involves completing an 8-hour, self-paced, online set of four modules during the first four weeks of the semester followed by a competency exam. Students who successfully complete the exam become certified. The certified students work in teams with client agencies in various cities around the United States. Through preparatory interactions with the agencies, and short on-site visits, teams prepare vulnerability assessments that client agencies can use to secure the technical assistance and financial support they need to manage the risks of cyberattack they are facing. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 15.
Fall: L. Susskind, J. Chun
Spring: L. Susskind, J. Chun
No textbook information available

11.092 Renewable Energy Facility Siting Clinic
(New)
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring)
(Subject meets with 11.592)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-4-6
Lecture: F3-5 (9-450A)
______
Presents methods for resolving facility siting disputes, particularly those involving renewable energy. After completing four modules and a competency exam for MITx certification, students work in teams to help client communities in various cities around the United States. Through direct interactions with the proponents and opponents of facilities subject to local opposition, students complete a stakeholder assessment and offer joint fact-finding and collaborative problem-solving assistance. The political, legal, financial, and regulatory aspects of facility siting, particularly for renewable energy, are reviewed along with key infrastructure planning principles. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 15.
Fall: L. Susskind and J. Chun
Spring: L. Susskind and J. Chun
No textbook information available

Specialized Subjects

11.100 Introduction to Computational Thinking in Cities
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: None. Coreq: 6.100B
Units: 1-0-2 [P/D/F]
______
Highlights how computer science may inform and impact how cities are conceptualized, planned, designed, regulated, and managed. The first half of the class explores the history of computational approaches in urban planning between around 1950 and 2020. The second half attempts to connect the data science concepts learned in 6.100B to topics in city planning and design. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first-year students.
A. Sevtsuk

11.107 Tools and Techniques for Inclusive Economic Development
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
(Subject meets with 11.407)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces tools and techniques in economic development planning. Extensive use of data collection, analysis, and display techniques. Students build interpretive intuition skills through user experience design activities and develop a series of memos summarizing the results of their data analysis. These are aggregated into a final report, and include the tools developed over the semester. Students taking graduate version complete modified assignments focused on developing computer applications.
A. Glasmeier

11.111[J] Leadership in Negotiation: Advanced Applications
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as 17.381[J])
Prereq: 11.011 or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
______
Building on the skills and strategies honed in 11.011, explores advanced negotiation practice. Emphasizes an experiential skill-building approach, underpinned by cutting-edge cases and innovative research. Examines applications in high-stakes management, public policy, social entrepreneurship, international diplomacy, and scientific discovery. Strengthens collaborative decision-making, persuasion, and leadership skills by negotiating across different media and through personalized coaching, enhancing students' ability to proactively engage stakeholders, transform organizations, and inspire communities. Limited by lottery; consult class website for information and deadlines.
B. Verdini Trejo

11.113 The Economic Approach to Cities and Environmental Sustainability
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 11.413)
Prereq: 1.010, 14.30, 18.650, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides a systematic framework of the interplay (both tension and synergy) between urbanization and environmental sustainability from a global perspective. Enhances analytical reasoning and quantitative skills to assist evidence-based empirical study and policy design evaluation. Explores the causes and consequences of urban environmental quality dynamics, and provides econometric tools to quantify such relationships. Examines state-of-the-art research in this field by introducing empirical studies from both developing and developed countries (highlighting fast urbanization). Themes include urban production, households, transportation and form, as well as political economy and climate resilience. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
S. Zheng

11.119 NEET Seminar: Digital Cities
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units: 1-0-2 [P/D/F]
______
Seminar for students enrolled in the Digital Cities NEET thread. Focuses on topics around clean energy and sustainability in cities via guest lectures and research discussions.
C. Cong

11.122[J] Law, Technology, and Public Policy
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as IDS.066[J])
(Subject meets with 11.422[J], 15.655[J], IDS.435[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines how law, economics, and technological change shape public policy, and how law can sway technological change; how the legal system responds to environmental, safety, energy, social, and ethical problems; how law and markets interact to influence technological development; and how law can affect wealth distribution, employment, and social justice. Covers energy/climate change; genetic engineering; telecommunications and role of misinformation; industrial automation; effect of regulation on technological innovation; impacts of antitrust law on innovation and equity; pharmaceuticals; nanotechnology; cost/benefit analysis as a decision tool; public participation in governmental decisions affecting science and technology; corporate influence on technology and welfare; and law and economics as competing paradigms to encourage sustainability. Students taking graduate version explore subject in greater depth.
N. Ashford

11.123 Big Plans and Mega-Urban Landscapes
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
______
Explores the physical, ecological, technological, political, economic and cultural implications of big plans and mega-urban landscapes in a global context. Uses local and international case studies to understand the process of making major changes to urban landscape and city fabric, and to regional landscape systems. Includes lectures by leading practitioners. Assignments consider planning and design strategies across multiple scales and time frames.
A. Berger 

11.124[J] Introduction to Education: Looking Forward and Looking Back on Education
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences Communication Intensive HASS
(Same subject as CMS.586[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-6-3
______
One of two introductory subjects on teaching and learning science and mathematics in a variety of K-12 settings. Topics include education and media, education reform, the history of education, simulations, games, and the digital divide. Students gain practical experience through weekly visits to schools, classroom discussions, selected readings, and activities to develop a critical and broad understanding of past and current forces that shape the goals and processes of education, and explores the challenges and opportunities of teaching. Students work collaboratively and individually on papers, projects, and in-class presentations. Limited to 25.
M. Hughes

11.125[J] Introduction to Education: Understanding and Evaluating Education
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences Communication Intensive HASS
(Same subject as CMS.587[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-6-3
Lecture: TR2.30-4 (56-154) Lab: TBA
______
One of two introductory subjects on teaching and learning science and mathematics in a variety of K-12 settings. Topics include student misconceptions, formative assessment, standards and standardized testing, multiple intelligences, and educational technology. Students gain practical experience through weekly visits to schools, classroom discussions, selected readings, and activities to develop a critical and broad understanding of past and current forces that shape the goals and processes of education, and explores the challenges and opportunities of teaching. Students work collaboratively and individually on papers, projects, and in-class presentations. Limited to 25.
J. Gardony, M. Hughes
No required or recommended textbooks

11.127[J] Design and Development of Games for Learning
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Humanities
(Same subject as CMS.590[J])
(Subject meets with 11.252[J], CMS.863[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-6-3
Lecture: TR1-2.30 (E25-117) Lab: TBA
______
Immerses students in the process of building and testing their own digital and board games in order to better understand how we learn from games. Explores the design and use of games in the classroom in addition to research and development issues associated with computer-based (desktop and handheld) and non-computer-based media. In developing their own games, students examine what and how people learn from them (including field testing of products), as well as how games can be implemented in educational settings. All levels of computer experience welcome. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
E. Klopfer, C. Feeley
No required or recommended textbooks

11.129[J] Educational Theory and Practice I
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as CMS.591[J])
Prereq: None. Coreq: CMS.586
Units: 3-0-9
______
Concentrates on core set of skills and knowledge necessary for teaching in secondary schools. Topics include classroom management, student behavior and motivation, curriculum design, educational reform, and the teaching profession. Classroom observation is a key component. Assignments include readings from educational literature, written reflections on classroom observations, practice teaching and constructing curriculum. The first of the three-course sequence necessary to complete the Teacher Education Program. Limited to 15; preference to juniors and seniors.
G. Schwanbeck

11.130[J] Educational Theory and Practice II
______

Undergrad (IAP)
(Same subject as CMS.592[J])
Prereq: CMS.591
Units: 3-0-9
______
Concentrates on the theory and psychology associated with student learning. Topics include educational theory, educational psychology, and theories of learning. Students assume responsibility for full-time teaching of two or more classes at their designated school. Class sessions focus on debriefing and problem-solving. Second of a three-course sequence necessary to complete the Teacher Education Program.
G. Schwanbeck
No required or recommended textbooks

11.131[J] Educational Theory and Practice III
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as CMS.593[J])
Prereq: CMS.592
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR4-5.30 (56-154)
______
Students continue their IAP student teaching through mid March. Topics include educational psychology, theories of learning, and using technology and evaluating its effectiveness to enhance student learning. Assignments include readings from educational literature, written reflections on student teaching, presentations on class topics and creating a project that supports student learning at the school where the MIT student is teaching. This is the third of the three-course sequence necessary to complete the Teacher Education Program.
G. Schwanbeck
No required or recommended textbooks

11.133[J] Dilemmas in Biomedical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good?
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 21A.302[J], WGS.271[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
An introduction to the cross-cultural study of biomedical ethics. Examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western biomedicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation and other issues. Evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. Discusses critiques of the biomedical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.
Staff

11.134[J] Infections and Inequalities: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Global Health
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as HST.431[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines case studies in infectious disease outbreaks to demonstrate how human health is a product of multiple determinants, such as biology, sociocultural and historical factors, politics, economic processes, and the environment. Analyzes how structural inequalities render certain populations vulnerable to illness and explores the moral and ethical dimensions of public health and clinical interventions to promote health. Limited to 25.
Staff

11.135 Violence, Human Rights, and Justice
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
An examination of the problem of mass violence and oppression in the contemporary world, and of the concept of human rights as a defense against such abuse. Explores questions of cultural relativism, race, gender and ethnicity. Examines case studies from war crimes tribunals, truth commissions, anti-terrorist policies and other judicial attempts to redress state-sponsored wrongs. Considers whether the human rights framework effectively promotes the rule of law in modern societies. Students debate moral positions and address ideas of moral relativism.
Staff

11.136 Global Mental Health
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides skills to critically analyze issues of mental health in historical and cross-cultural contexts. Studies mental illness as a complex biopsychosocial experience embedded in particular political and economic frameworks. Examines the relationships among culture, gender, embodiment, and emotional distress; power inequalities and ideas of the "normal" and "abnormal;" and how such conceptions influence care-giving practices, whether in traditional or biomedical contexts. Evaluates how the disciplines of psychology, psychoanalysis, and psychiatry have developed in the West, and considers their influence on mental health interventions in global settings. Limited to 25.
Staff

11.137 Financing Economic Development and Housing
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 11.437)
Prereq: None
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: TR2-3.30 (9-451)
______
Studies financing tools and program models to support and promote local economic development and housing. Overview of public and private capital markets and financing sources helps illustrate market imperfections that constrain economic and housing development and increase race and class disparaties. Explores federal housing and economic development programs as well as state and local public finance tools. Covers policies and program models. Investigates public finance practice to better understand how these finance programs affect other municipal operations. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 25.
J. Levine
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

11.138 Crowd Sourced City: Civic Tech Prototyping
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
(Subject meets with 11.458)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Investigates the use of social medial and digital technologies for planning and advocacy by working with actual planning and advocacy organizations to develop, implement, and evaluate prototype digital tools. Students use the development of their digital tools as a way to investigate new media technologies that can be used for planning. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
C. D'Ignazio

11.139 The City in Film
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring) HASS Humanities Communication Intensive HASS
(Subject meets with 11.239)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-2-5
______
Surveys important developments in urbanism from 1900 to the present, using film as a lens to explore and interpret aspects of the urban experience in the US and abroad. Topics include industrialization, demographics, diversity, the environment, and the relationship between the community and the individual. Films vary from year to year but always include a balance of classics from the history of film, an occasional experimental/avant-garde film, and a number of more recent, mainstream movies. Students taking undergraduate version complete writing assignments that focus on observation, analysis, and the essay, and give an oral presentation. Limited to 18.
E. Glenn

11.140 Urbanization and Development
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines developmental dynamics of rapidly urbanizing locales, with a special focus on the developing world. Case studies from India, China, Mexico, Brazil, and South Africa form the basis for discussion of social, spatial, political and economic changes in cities spurred by the decline of industry, the rise of services, and the proliferation of urban mega projects. Emphasizes the challenges of growing urban inequality, environmental risk, citizen displacement, insufficient housing, and the lack of effective institutions for metropolitan governance.
Staff

11.142 Geography of the Global Economy
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
(Subject meets with 11.442)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Analyzes implications of economic globalization for communities, regions, international businesses and economic development organizations. Uses spatial analysis techniques to model the role of energy resources in shaping international political economy. Investigates key drivers of human, physical, and social capital flows and their roles in modern human settlement systems. Surveys contemporary models of industrialization and places them in geographic context. Connects forces of change with their implications for the distribution of wealth and human well-being. Looks backward to understand pre-Covid conditions and then returns to the present to understand how a global pandemic changes the world. Class relies on current literature and explorations of sectors. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

11.143 Research Methods in Global Health and Development
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
(Subject meets with 11.243)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-3-6
Lecture: W9.30-12.30 (9-450A)
______
Provides training for students to critically analyze the relationship between "health" and "development." Draws upon the theory and methods of medical anthropology, social medicine, public health, and development to track how culture, history, and political economy influence health and disease in global communities. Students work in teams to formulate research questions, and collect and analyze qualitative data in clinical and community settings in the greater Boston area, in order to design effective development interventions aimed at reducing health disparities in the US and abroad. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
E. C. James
No textbook information available

11.144 Project Appraisal in Developing Countries
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers techniques of financial analysis of investment expenditures, as well as the economic and distributive appraisal of development projects. Critical analysis of these tools in the political economy of international development is discussed. Topics include appraisal's role in the project cycle, planning under conditions of uncertainty, constraints in data quality and the limits of rational analysis, and the coordination of an interdisciplinary appraisal team. Enrollment limited; preference to majors.
Staff

11.145 International Housing Economics and Finance
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 14.01
Units: 3-0-6
Credit cannot also be received for 11.355
Lecture: MW9.30-11 (9-217)
______
Presents a theory of comparative differences in international housing outcomes. Introduces institutional differences in the ways housing expenditures are financed, and the economic determinants of housing outcomes, such as construction costs, land values, housing quality, and ownership rates. Analyzes the flow of funds to and from the different national housing finance sectors. Develops an understanding of the greater financial and macroeconomic implications of the mortgage credit sector, and how policies affect the ways housing asset fluctuations impact national economies. Considers the perspective of investors in international real estate markets and the risks and rewards involved. Draws on lessons from an international comparative approach, and applies them to economic and finance policies at the local, state/provincial, and federal levels within a country of choice. Meets with 11.355 when offered concurrently. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
A. Saiz
No textbook information available

11.147 Budgeting and Finance for the Public Sector
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 11.487)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines globally relevant challenges of adequately and effectively attending to public sector responsibilities for basic services with limited resources. Particular attention to the contexts of fiscal crises and rapid population growth, as well as shrinkage, through an introduction to methods and processes of budgeting, accounting, and financial mobilization. Case studies and practice exercises explore revenue strategies, demonstrate fiscal analytical competencies, and familiarize students with pioneering examples of promising budget and accounting processes and innovative funding mobilization via taxation, capital markets, and other mechanisms (e.g., land-value capture). Students taking graduate version explore the subject in greater depth.
G. Carolini

11.148 Environmental Justice: Law and Policy
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 11.368)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces frameworks for analyzing and addressing inequalities in the distribution of environmental benefits and burdens, particularly by race and by class. Explores the foundations and principles of the environmental justice movement from the perspectives of social science, public policy, and law. Introduces basic principles of US constitutional and environmental law, with a focus on equal protection and civil rights. Applies environmental justice principles to contemporary issues in urban policy and planning, including effects of and responses to climate change and global heating. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
J. Steil

11.149 Decarbonizing Urban Mobility
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 11.449)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-3-6
Lecture: W2-5 (9-451)
______
Focuses on measuring and reducing emissions from passenger transportation. After examining travel, energy, and climate conditions, students review existing approaches to transport decarbonization. Evaluates new mobility technologies through their potential to contribute to (or delay) a zero emission mobility system. Students consider the policy tools required to achieve approaches to achieve change. Frames past and future emission reductions using an approach based on the Kaya Identity, decomposing past (and potential future) emissions into their component pieces. Seeks to enable students to be intelligent evaluators of approaches to transportation decarbonization and equip them with the tools to develop and evaluate policy measures relevant to their local professional challenges. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
A. Salzberg
No textbook information available

11.150[J] Metropolis: A Comparative History of New York City
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Humanities
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 21H.220[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines the evolution of New York City from 1607 to the present. Readings focus on the city's social and physical histories. Discussions compare New York's development to patterns in other cities.
C. Wilder

11.151[J] Youth Political Participation
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring) HASS Humanities
(Same subject as STS.080[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Surveys youth political participation in the US since the early 1800s. Investigates trends in youth political activism during specific historical periods, as well as what difference youth media production and technology use (e.g., radio, music, automobiles, ready-made clothing) made in determining the course of events. Explores what is truly new about "new media" and reviews lessons from history for present-day activists based on patterns of past failure and success. Some mandatory field trips may occur during class time. Limited to 40.
J. S. Light

11.152[J] The Ghetto: From Venice to Harlem
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 21H.385[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides an in-depth look at a modern institution of oppression: the ghetto. Uses literature to examine ghettoization over time and across a wide geographical area, from Jews in Medieval Europe to African-Americans and Latinos in the 20th-century United States. Also explores segregation and poverty in the urban "Third World."
C. Wilder

11.153[J] Shanghai and China's Modernization
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Humanities
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 21H.351[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-10
______
Considers the history and function of Shanghai, from 1840 to the present, and its rise from provincial backwater to international metropolis. Examines its role as a primary point of economic, political, and social contact between China and the world, and the strong grip Shanghai holds on both the Chinese and foreign imagination. Students discuss the major events and figures of Shanghai, critique the classic historiography, and complete an independent project on Shanghai history.
Staff

11.154 Big Data, Visualization, and Society
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 11.454)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Credit cannot also be received for 6.8530, 6.C35, 6.C85, 11.454, 11.C35, 11.C85
______
Data visualizations communicate the insights found in data to non-technical audiences. Students develop technical skills to work with big data to expose societal issues and communicate the insights. Focuses on different topics each year. After framing that topic, the first half of the subject focuses on learning to analyze the data with Python. The second half of the subject focuses on learning web-based data visualization tools (JavaScript and D3). Students learn data storytelling concepts and produce web-based data visualizations for their final projects. Throughout, students learn ethical data practices. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
C. D'Ignazio, S. Williams

11.C35[J] Interactive Data Visualization and Society
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Same subject as 6.C35[J])
(Subject meets with 6.C85[J], 11.C85[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-1-8
Credit cannot also be received for 6.8530, 11.154, 11.454
Lecture: MW9.30-11 (45-230) Lab: R3 (1-190)
______
Covers the design, ethical, and technical skills for creating effective visualizations. Short assignments build familiarity with the data analysis and visualization design process. Weekly lab sessions present coding and technical skills. A final project provides experience working with real-world big data, provided by external partners, in order to expose and communicate insights about societal issues. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment limited. Enrollment limited.
A. Satyanarayan
No textbook information available

11.155[J] Data and Society
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring) HASS Humanities
(Same subject as IDS.057[J], STS.005[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces students to the social, political, and ethical aspects of data science work. Designed to create reflective practitioners who are able to think critically about how collecting, aggregating, and analyzing data are social processes and processes that affect people.
E. Medina, S. Williams

11.156 Healthy Cities: Assessing Health Impacts of Policies and Plans
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 11.356)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines the built, psychosocial, economic, and natural environment factors that affect health behaviors and outcomes, including population-level patterns of disease distribution and health disparities. Introduces tools designed to integrate public health considerations into policy-making and planning. Provides extensive practical, budgeting, and programming training in the application of health impact assessment tools meant to integrate Health in All Policies, including Health Impact Assessment (HIA) methodology, which brings a health lens to policy, budgeting, and planning debates. Emphasizes health equity and healthy cities, and explores the relationship between health equity and broader goals for social and racial justice. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 30.
M. Arcaya

11.157[J] China's Growth: Political Economy, Business, and Urbanization
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring); second half of term
(Same subject as 15.2391[J])
(Subject meets with 11.257[J], 15.239[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-3
______
Examines different aspects of the growth of China, which has the second largest economy in the world. Studies the main drivers of Chinese economic growth and the forces behind the largest urbanization in human history. Discusses how to understand China's booming real estate market, and how Chinese firms operate to attain their success, whether through hard-working entrepreneurship or political connections with the government. Explores whether the top-down urban and industrial policy interventions improve efficiency or cause misallocation problems, and whether the Chinese political system in an enabler of Chinese growth or a potential impediment to the country's future growth prospects. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Y. Huang, S. Zheng, Z. Tan

11.158 Behavioral Science, AI, and Urban Mobility
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
(Subject meets with 11.478)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Integrates behavioral science, artificial intelligence, and transportation technology to shape travel behavior, design mobility systems and business, and reform transportation policies. Introduces methods to sense travel behavior with new technology and measurements; nudge behavior through perception and preference shaping; design mobility systems and ventures that integrate autonomous vehicles, shared mobility, and public transit; and regulate travel with behavior-sensitive transport policies. Challenges students to pilot behavioral experiments and design creative mobility systems, business and policies. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
J. Zhao

11.159 Entrepreneurial Negotiation
______

Undergrad (Fall); partial term
(Subject meets with 11.259)
Prereq: None
Units: 1-3-2 [P/D/F]
______
Combines online weekly face-to-face negotiation exercises and in-person lectures designed to empower budding entrepreneurs with negotiation techniques to protect and increase the value of their ideas, deal with ego and build trust in relationships, and navigate entrepreneurial bargaining under constraints of economic uncertainty and complex technical considerations. Students must complete scheduled weekly assignments, including feedback memos to counterpart negotiators, and meet on campus with the instructor to discuss and reflect on their experiences with the course. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Samuel Dinnar

11.162 Politics of Energy and the Environment
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on the politics of making local, state, national and international decisions on energy and the environment. Topics include implementing energy efficiency measures, siting nuclear and alternative energy plants, promoting oil and gas development offshore and in wilderness, adapting to climate change, handling toxic waste, protecting endangered species, and conserving water. Case studies include Cape Wind, disputes over oil and gas exploration in the Arctic, the response to Hurricane Katrina, and efforts to craft and comply with the greenhouse gas emissions limits.
Staff

11.164[J] Human Rights at Home and Abroad
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as 17.391[J])
(Subject meets with 11.497)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-10
______
Provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the history, foundation, structure, and operation of the human rights movement. Focuses on key ideas, actors, methods and sources, and critically evaluates the field. Addresses current debates in human rights, including the relationship with security, democracy, development and globalization, urbanization, equality (in housing and other economic and social rights; women's rights; ethnic, religious and racial discrimination; and policing/conflict), post-conflict rebuilding and transitional justice, and technology in human rights activism. No prior coursework needed, but work experience, or community service that demonstrates familiarity with global affairs or engagement with ethics and social justice issues, preferred. Students taking graduate version are expected to write a research paper.
B. Rajagopal

11.165 Urban Energy Systems and Policy
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
(Subject meets with 1.286[J], 11.477[J])
Prereq: 14.01 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions. Examines key issues in the current and future development of urban energy systems, such as technology, use, behavior, regulation, climate change, and lack of access or energy poverty. Case studies on a diverse sampling of cities explore how prospective technologies and policies can be implemented. Includes intensive group research projects, discussion, and debate. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.
Y. Hsu

11.166 Law, Social Movements, and Public Policy: Comparative and International Experience
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 11.496)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Studies the interaction between law, courts, and social movements in shaping domestic and global public policy. Examines how groups mobilize to use law to affect change and why they succeed and fail. Case studies explore the interplay between law, social movements, and public policy in current issues, such as gender, race, labor, trade, climate change/environment, and LGBTQ rights. Introduces theories of public policy, social movements, law and society, and transnational studies. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 15.
B. Rajagopal

11.167[J] Global Energy: Politics, Markets, and Policy
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 14.47[J], 15.2191[J], 17.399[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Credit cannot also be received for 11.267, 15.219
______
Focuses on the ways economics and politics influence the fate of energy technologies, business models, and policies around the world. Extends fundamental concepts in the social sciences to case studies and simulations that illustrate how corporate, government, and individual decisions shape energy and environmental outcomes. In a final project, students apply the concepts in order to assess the prospects for an energy innovation to scale and advance sustainability goals in a particular regional market. Recommended prerequisite: 14.01. Meets with 15.219 when offered concurrently. Expectations and evaluation criteria differ for students taking graduate version; consult syllabus or instructor for specific details. Preference to juniors, seniors, and Energy Minors.
Staff

11.169 Global Climate Policy and Sustainability
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
(Subject meets with 11.269)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines climate politics both nationally and globally. Addresses economic growth, environmental preservation, and social equity through the lens of sustainability. Uses various country and regional cases to analyze how sociopolitical, economic and environmental values shape climate policy. Students develop recommendations for making climate policy more effective and sustainable. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 25.
J. Knox-Hayes

11.170 Cities and Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences Can be repeated for credit
(Subject meets with 11.270)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines climate adaptation and mitigation responses at the city level. Discusses factors of greatest concern in adapting cities to climate change, including infrastructure; energy, food, and water systems; health; housing; and environmental justice. Various city and regional cases are used to analyze how cities are mobilizing to face climate change and integrate core considerations into urban planning. Working on independent case studies, students analyze how cities make urban planning decisions with respect to climate adaptation. In the process, students practice analytical skills to better understand how urban policies are made, and how they can be improved. Students develop recommendations for making climate adaptation more effective and sustainable at the city level. Assignment requirements differ for students completing the graduate version. Limited to 25.
Staff

11.171 Indigenous Environmental Planning
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 11.271)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: W2-5 (9-255)
______
Examines how Indigenous peoples' relationships to their homelands and local environments has been adversely affected by Western planning. Explores how these relationships have changed over time as American Indians, Alaska Natives, and other groups indigenous to North America and Hawai'i have adapted to new conditions, including exclusion from markets of exchange, overhunting/overfishing, dispossession, petrochemical development, conservation, mainstream environmentalism, and climate change. Seeks to understand current environmental challenges and their roots and discover potential solutions to address these challenges. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Lawrence Susskind, Janelle Knox-Hayes, Jean-Luc Pierite
No textbook information available

11.173[J] Infrastructure Design for Climate Change
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 1.103[J])
(Subject meets with 1.303[J], 11.273[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 0-2-4
______
In this team-oriented, project-based subject, students work to find technical solutions that could be implemented to mitigate the effects of natural hazards related to climate change, bearing in mind that any proposed measures must be appropriate in a given region's socio-political-economic context. Students are introduced to a variety of natural hazards and possible mitigation approaches as well as principles of design, including adaptable design and design for failure. Students select the problems they want to solve and develop their projects. During the term, officials and practicing engineers of Cambridge, Boston, Puerto Rico, and MIT Facilities describe their approaches. Student projects are documented in a written report and oral presentation. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment limited; preference to juniors and seniors.
H. Einstein

Laboratories

11.188 Introduction to Spatial Analysis and GIS Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Institute Lab
Prereq: None
Units: 3-3-6
Credit cannot also be received for 11.205
Lecture: MW2.30-4 (9-354) Lab: F1-4 (9-554)
______
An introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS), a tool for visualizing and analyzing spatial data. Explores how GIS can make maps, guide decisions, answer questions, and advocate for change. Class builds toward a project in which students critically apply GIS techniques to an area of interest. Students build data discovery, cartography, and spatial analysis skills while learning to reflect on their positionality within the research design process. Because maps and data are never neutral, the class incorporates discussions of power, ethics, and data throughout as part of a reflective practice. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication provided.
Fall: E. Huntley, C. Cong
Spring: C. D'Ignazio, E. Huntley
No textbook information available

Tutorials, Fieldwork, and Internships

11.UAR[J] Climate and Sustainability Undergraduate Advanced Research
(New)
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
(Same subject as 1.UAR[J], 3.UAR[J], 5.UAR[J], 12.UAR[J], 15.UAR[J], 22.UAR[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
Lecture: TR4 (32-144)
______
Provides instruction in effective research, experiential projects, internships, and externships, including choosing and refining problems, surveying previous work and publications, industry best practices, design for robustness, technical presentation, authorship and collaboration, and ethics. Supporting content includes background and context pertaining to climate change and sustainability, as well as tools for sustainable design. Focus for project work includes research topics relevant to the MIT Climate & Sustainability Consortium (MCSC). Students engage in extensive written and oral communication exercises, in the context of an approved advanced research project. A total of 12 units of credit is awarded for completion of the spring and subsequent fall term offerings. Application required; consult MCSC website for more information.
Fall: E. Olivetti, J. Grossman
Spring: E. Olivetti, J. Grossman
No required or recommended textbooks

11.UR Undergraduate Research
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
TBA.
______
Undergraduate research opportunities in Urban Studies and Planning. For further information, consult the Departmental Coordinators.
Fall: S. Elliott
IAP: S. Elliott
Spring: S. Elliott
Summer: S. Elliott
No required or recommended textbooks

11.URG Undergraduate Research
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
TBA.
______
Undergraduate research opportunities in Urban Studies and Planning. For further information, consult the Departmental Coordinators.
Fall: S. Elliott
IAP: S. Elliott
Spring: S. Elliott
Summer: S. Elliott
No required or recommended textbooks

11.THT[J] Thesis Research Design Seminar
______

Undergrad (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
(Same subject as 4.THT[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Designed for students writing a thesis in Urban Studies and Planning or Architecture. Develop research topics, review relevant research and scholarship, frame research questions and arguments, choose an appropriate methodology for analysis, and draft introductory and methodology sections.
C. Abbanat

11.THU Undergraduate Thesis
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: 11.THT
Units arranged
TBA.
______
Program of research leading to the writing of an SB thesis. To be arranged by the student under approved supervision.
Fall: S. Elliott
IAP: S. Elliott
Spring: S. Elliott
Summer: S. Elliott
No required or recommended textbooks

11.189-11.190 Urban Fieldwork
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
11.189: TBA.
11.190: TBA.
______
Practical application of city and regional planning techniques to towns, cities, and regions, including problems of replanning, redevelopment, and renewal of existing communities. Includes internships, under staff supervision, in municipal and state agencies and departments.
Fall: S. Elliott
Spring: S. Elliott
11.189: No textbook information available
11.190: No textbook information available

11.191-11.192 Independent Study
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
11.191: TBA.
11.192: TBA.
______
For undergraduates wishing to pursue further study in specialized areas of urban studies or city and regional planning not covered in regular subjects.
Fall: S. Elliott
IAP: S. Elliott
Spring: S. Elliott
11.191: No textbook information available
11.192: No required or recommended textbooks

11.193-11.194 Supervised Readings
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
11.193: TBA.
11.194: TBA.
______
Reading and discussion of topics in urban studies and planning.
Fall: S. Elliott
Spring: S. Elliott
11.193: No textbook information available
11.194: No textbook information available

11.S03 Special Subject: Transportation Shaping Sustainable Urbanization: Connections with Behavior, Urban Economics and Planning
______

Undergrad (Fall); partial term
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-1 [P/D/F]
______
Explores changes in the built environment expected from transportation investments, and how they can be used to promote sustainable and equitable cities. Reflects on how notable characteristics of cities can be explained by their historical and current transportation features. Introduces theoretical basis and empirical evidence to analyze the urban transformation autonomous vehicles will bring and how shared mobility services affect travel behavior, and its implications from an urban planning perspective. Lectures interspersed with guest speakers and an optional field trip. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first-year students. Licensed for Fall 2023 by the Committee on Curricula. Limited to 18.
F. Duarte De Araujo Silva

11.S04 Special Subject: Topics in Affordable Housing
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 1-0-2 [P/D/F]
______
Weekly seminar-style discussions on topics in affordable housing, including federal funding programs, homelessness prevention and shelters, local land use and zoning for affordability, innovative housing models/designs, fair housing laws, the history of public housing in the US, and international comparisons. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first year students.
Staff

11.S187 Special Subject: Urban Studies and Planning
______

Undergrad (Fall) Can be repeated for credit; second half of term
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
______
For undergraduates wishing to pursue further study or fieldwork in specialized areas of urban studies or city and regional planning not covered in regular subjects of instruction.
Cong Cong

11.S188 Special Subject: Urban Studies and Planning
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
______
For undergraduates wishing to pursue further study or fieldwork in specialized areas of urban studies or city and regional planning not covered in regular subjects of instruction.
Fall: J. Knox
IAP: J. Ferreira, C. Cong
No textbook information available

11.S189 Special Subject: Urban Studies and Planning
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Lecture: R10-12 (9-255)
______
For undergraduates wishing to pursue further study or fieldwork in specialized areas of urban studies or city and regional planning not covered in regular subjects of instruction.
Fall: J. Ferreira, Jr, P. Ferraz de Abreu
Spring: B. Rajagopal, S. Aiyar
No textbook information available

11.S195 Special Subject: Urban Studies and Planning
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
11.S195: Lecture: W3-5 (9-450A)
11.S196: TBA.
11.S197: TBA.
______
For undergraduates wishing to pursue further study or fieldwork in specialized areas of urban studies or city and regional planning not covered in regular subjects of instruction.
B. Rajagopal
11.S195: No textbook information available
11.S196: No textbook information available
11.S197: No textbook information available

11.S196-11.S199 Special Subject: Urban Studies and Planning
______

Undergrad (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
11.S195: Lecture: W3-5 (9-450A)
11.S196: TBA.
11.S197: TBA.
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For undergraduates wishing to pursue further study or fieldwork in specialized areas of urban studies or city and regional planning not covered in regular subjects of instruction. 11.S198 is graded P/D/F.
Staff
11.S195: No textbook information available
11.S196: No textbook information available
11.S197: No textbook information available


left arrow | Undergraduate: 11.00-11.199
plus UROP, THU, THT
| Graduate: 11.20-11.299 | Graduate: 11.30-11.999 plus THG | right arrow



Produced: 18-APR-2024 05:10 PM