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Course 3: Materials Science and Engineering
IAP/Spring 2024


3.000 Coffee Matters: Using the Breakerspace to Make the Perfect Cup
(New)
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-0 [P/D/F]
Lecture: TR11 (4-231) or TR1 (24-121)
______
Uses the Course 3 (DMSE) Breakerspace to delve into the world of materials science through brewing, sipping, and testing several forms of coffee and espresso. Presents cutting-edge materials characterization tools, including optical and electron microscopes, spectroscopy techniques, and hardness/strength testing. Through experiments to analyze the composition and microstructure of coffee beans, grinds, and brewing equipment, students have the opportunity to learn how material properties influence the taste, aroma, and quality of espresso. Equips students with the knowledge and skills to appreciate coffee on a whole new level through application of materials characterization techniques, consideration of relevant physics and chemistry, and sampling. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first-year students.
J. Grossman, J. Lavallee
No textbook information available

3.001 Science and Engineering of Materials
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-1 [P/D/F]
Lecture: T12-2 (8-205)
______
Provides a broad introduction to topics in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering's core subjects. Classes emphasize hands-on activities and conceptual and visual examples of materials phenomena and materials engineering, interspersed with guest speakers from inside and outside academia to show career paths. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first year students. Preference to first-year students.
Fall: K. Kolenbrander
Spring: F. Ross
No required or recommended textbooks

3.002 Materials for Energy and Sustainability
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-1 [P/D/F]
______
Materials play a central role in the ongoing global transformation towards more sustainable means of harvesting, storing, and conserving energy, through better batteries, fuel cells, hydrogen electrolyzers, photovoltaics, and the like. Methods for producing materials such as cement, steel, ammonia, and ethylene, which rank amongst today's largest industrial emitters of greenhouse gases, are being re-invented. Much of this work is taking place at MIT and surrounding cleantech startups. This class discusses the underlying science of selected new technologies, the challenges which must be overcome, and the magnitude of their potential impact. Visits to the startups behind each case study and meetings with the scientists and engineers creating these technologies are included. Subject can count toward 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first-year students. Preference to first-year students.
Y. Chiang

3.003 Small Planet Engineering: Climate, Energy, and Sustainability
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 3.004)
Prereq: Calculus I (GIR) and Physics I (GIR)
Units: 3-0-6
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Introduces students to the interdisciplinary nature of 21st-century engineering projects with three threads of learning: a technical toolkit, a social science toolkit, and a methodology for problem-based learning. Students encounter the social, political, economic, and technological challenges of engineering practice via case studies and engineering projects focused on climate, energy, and sustainability. Includes a six-stage term project in which student teams develop solutions through exercises in project planning, analysis, design, optimization, demonstration, reporting, and team building. 3.004 includes an additional solar cell design and fabrication project. Preference to first-year students.
L. Kimerling

3.004 Small Planet Engineering: Climate, Energy, and Sustainability
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 3.003)
Prereq: Calculus I (GIR) and Physics I (GIR)
Units: 3-1-8
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Introduces students to the interdisciplinary nature of 21st-century engineering projects with three threads of learning: a technical toolkit, a social science toolkit, and a methodology for problem-based learning. Students encounter the social, political, economic, and technological challenges of engineering practice via case studies and engineering projects focused on climate, energy, and sustainability. Includes a six-stage term project in which student teams develop solutions through exercises in project planning, analysis, design, optimization, demonstration, reporting, and team building. 3.004 includes an additional solar cell design and fabrication project.
L. Kimerling
No textbook information available

3.006 NEET Seminar: Advanced Materials Machines
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 1-0-2
Lecture: R EVE (7 PM) (3-001)
______
Seminar for students enrolled in the Advanced Materials Machines NEET thread. Focuses on topics around innovative materials manufacturing via guest lectures and research discussions.
Fall: N. Melenbrink
Spring: N. Melenbrink
No textbook information available

3.0061[J] Introduction to Design Thinking and Rapid Prototyping
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 22.03[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-2-2
______
Focuses on design thinking, an iterative process that uses divergent and convergent thinking to approach design problems and prototype and test solutions. Includes experiences in creativity, problem scoping, and rapid prototyping skills. Skills are built over the course of the semester through design exercises and projects. Enrollment limited; preference to Course 22 & Course 3 majors and minors, and NEET students.
E. Melenbrink

3.009 Materials, Mechanics, and Flight: Birds, an Engineer?s Delight
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 2-2-5
______
Examines how birds work from an engineering perspective and how engineers design materials, lightweight structures, and aircraft using concepts learned from birds. Topics include: materials science of feathers, and how engineers design materials for structural color, thermal insulation, and water repellency; how feathers can create or suppress sound, and how engineers reduce the sound produced by wind turbine blades by mimicking barn owl flight feathers; mechanics of bird bones, structural weight reduction, and its applications to lightweight structures; how birds fly, how the Wright brothers studied bird flight to design their plane, and how modern aircraft fly. Design project allows students to explore different fields of engineering. Preference given to first-year students.
L. Gibson

3.010 Structure of Materials
______

Undergrad (Fall) Institute Lab
Prereq: Chemistry (GIR); Coreq: 18.03 or 18.032
Units: 3-2-7
______
Describes the fundamentals of bonding and structure that underpin materials science. Structure of noncrystalline, crystalline, and liquid-crystalline states across length scales including short and long range ordering. Point, line, and surface imperfections in materials. Diffraction and structure determination. Covers molecular geometry and levels of structure in biological materials. Includes experimental and computational exploration of the connections between structure, properties, processing, and performance of materials. Covers methodology of technical communication (written/oral) with a view to integrate experimental design, execution, and analysis.
K. Kolenbrander, R. Freitas

3.013 Mechanics of Materials
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: Physics I (GIR) and Coreq: 18.03; or permission of instructor
Units: 3-2-7
______
Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials: elasticity, stress-strain relationships, stress transformation, viscoelasticity, plasticity, and fracture. Continuum behavior as well as atomistic explanations of the observed behavior are described. Examples from engineering as well as biomechanics. Lab experiments, computational exercises, and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts.
C. Tasan

3.017 Modelling, Problem Solving, Computing, and Visualization
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: ((3.030, 3.033, or 3.020) and (6.100A, 12.010, 16.66, or 3.016B)) or permission of instructor
Units: 2-2-8
______
Covers development and design of models for materials processes and structure-property relations. Emphasizes techniques for solving equations from models or simulating their behavior. Assesses methods for visualizing solutions and aesthetics of the graphical presentation of results. Topics include symmetry and structure, classical and statistical thermodynamics, solid state physics, mechanics, phase transformations and kinetics, statistics and presentation of data.
W. C. Carter

3.019 Introduction to Symbolic and Mathematical Computing
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 2-1-0 [P/D/F]
______
Introduces fundamental computational techniques and applications of mathematics to prepare students for materials science and engineering curriculum. Covers elementary programming concepts, including data analysis and visualization. Students study computation/visualization and math techniques and apply them in computational software to gain familiarity with techniques used in subsequent subjects. Uses examples from material science and engineering applications, particularly from structure and mechanics of materials, including linear algebra, tensor transformations, review of calculus of several variables, numerical solutions to differential questions, and random walks.
C. Carter

3.020 Thermodynamics of Materials
______

Undergrad (Spring) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
Prereq: Chemistry (GIR); Coreq: 18.03 or 18.032
Units: 4-2-6
Lecture: MWF10 (4-231) Lab: T10-12 (8-107) or R10-12 (8-107) Recitation: T10 (8-119) or R10 (8-119) +final
______
Introduces the competition between energetics and disorder that underpins materials thermodynamics. Presents classical thermodynamic concepts in the context of phase equilibria, including phase transformations, phase diagrams, and chemical reactions. Includes computerized thermodynamics and an introduction to statistical thermodynamics. Includes experimental and computational laboratories. Covers methodology of technical communication with the goal of presenting technical methods in broader contexts and for broad audiences.  
R. Jaramillo, A. Gumyusenge
No required or recommended textbooks

3.021 Introduction to Modeling and Simulation
______

Undergrad (Spring) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 1.021, 3.021, 10.333, 22.00)
Prereq: 18.03, 3.016B, or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: TR3-4.30 (4-231) Recitation: W3 (24-121)
______
Basic concepts of computer modeling and simulation in science and engineering. Uses techniques and software for simulation, data analysis and visualization. Continuum, mesoscale, atomistic and quantum methods used to study fundamental and applied problems in physics, chemistry, materials science, mechanics, engineering, and biology. Examples drawn from the disciplines above are used to understand or characterize complex structures and materials, and complement experimental observations.
M. Buehler, A. Hoffman
No textbook information available

3.023 Synthesis and Design of Materials
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 3.010
Units: 4-2-6
Lecture: MWF11 (4-231) Lab: T10-12 (8-107) or R10-12 (8-107) Recitation: T11 (8-119) or R11 (8-119)
______
Provides understanding of transitions in materials, including intermolecular forces, self-assembly, physical organic chemistry, surface chemistry and electrostatics, hierarchical structure, and reactivity. Describes these fundamentals across classes of materials, including solid-state synthesis, polymer synthesis, sol-gel chemistry, and interactions with biological systems. Includes firsthand application of lecture topics through design-oriented experiments.
R. Macfarlane, A. Gumyusenge
No textbook information available

3.029 Mathematics and Computational Thinking for Materials Scientists and Engineers I
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: Calculus II (GIR); Coreq: 3.020
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: MW3.30-5 (8-119)
______
Computational techniques and applications of mathematics to prepare students for a materials science and engineering curriculum. Students study computation/visualization and math techniques and apply them with symbolic algebra software (Mathematica). They code and visualize topics from symmetry and structure of materials and thermodynamics. Topics include symmetry and geometric transformations using linear algebra, review of calculus of several variables, numerical solutions to differential equations, tensor transformations, eigensystems, quadratic forms, and random walks. Supports concurrent material in 3.020.
C. Carter
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

3.030 Microstructural Evolution in Materials
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: 3.010 and 3.020
Units: 4-2-6
______
Covers microstructures, defects, and structural evolution in all classes of materials. Topics include solution kinetics, interface stability, dislocations and point defects, diffusion, surface energetics, grains and grain boundaries, grain growth, nucleation and precipitation, and electrochemical reactions. Lectures illustrate a range of examples and applications based on metals, ceramics, electronic materials, polymers, and biomedical materials. Explores the evolution of microstructure through experiments involving optical and electron microscopy, calorimetry, electrochemical characterization, surface roughness measurements, and other characterization methods. Investigates structural transitions and structure-property relationships through practical materials examples.
G. Beach

3.033 Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: 3.010 and 3.020
Units: 4-2-6
______
Uses fundamental principles of quantum mechanics, solid state physics, electricity and magnetism to describe how the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials originate. Illustrates how these properties can be designed for particular applications, such as diodes, solar cells, optical fibers, and magnetic data storage. Involves experimentation using spectroscopy, resistivity, impedance and magnetometry measurements, behavior of light in waveguides, and other characterization methods. Uses practical examples to investigate structure-property relationships.
J. Lebeau

3.039 Mathematics and Computational Thinking for Materials Scientists and Engineers II
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 3.029; Coreq: 3.030
Units: 3-0-6
______
Continues 3.029 with applications to microstructural evolution, electronic optical and magnetic properties of materials. Emphasizes and reinforces topics in 3.030 with visualization, computational, and mathematical techniques. Mathematics topics include symbolic and numerical solutions to partial differential equations, Fourier analysis, Bloch waves, and linear stability analysis.
W. C. Carter

3.041 Computational Materials Design
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 3.321)
Prereq: 3.013 and 3.030
Units: 3-2-7
Lecture: MWF11 (1-134) Lab: R10-12 (1-242)
______
Systems approach to analysis and control of multilevel materials microstructures employing genomic fundamental databases. Applies quantitative process-structure-property-performance relations in computational parametric design of materials composition under processability constraints to achieve predicted microstructures meeting multiple property objectives established by industry performance requirements. Covers integration of macroscopic process models with microstructural simulation to accelerate materials qualification through component-level process optimization and forecasting of manufacturing variation to efficiently define minimum property design allowables. Case studies of interdisciplinary multiphysics collaborative modeling with applications across materials classes. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. 
G. Olson
No textbook information available

3.042 Materials Project Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring)
Prereq: 3.030 or 3.033
Units: 1-6-5
Lecture: R1 (4-149) Lab: TR2-5 (4-131B)
______
Serves as the capstone design course in the DMSE curriculum. Working in groups, students explore the research and design processes necessary to build prototype materials and devices. Instruction focuses on how to conceive, design, and execute a materials development research plan, on developing competence in the fundamental laboratory and materials processing skills introduced in earlier course work, and on the preparation required for personal success in a team-based professional environment. Selected topics are covered in manufacturing, statistics, intellectual property, and ethics. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication provided. Limited to 25 due to space constraints.
Fall: M. Tarkanian
Spring: M. Tarkanian
No textbook information available

3.044 Materials Processing
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 3.010 and 3.030
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: MW2.30-4 (4-231) Recitation: TR11 (13-4101) or TR12 (13-4101)
______
Introduction to materials processing science, with emphasis on heat transfer, chemical diffusion, and fluid flow. Uses an engineering approach to analyze industrial-scale processes, with the goal of identifying and understanding physical limitations on scale and speed. Covers materials of all classes, including metals, polymers, electronic materials, and ceramics. Considers specific processes, such as melt-processing of metals and polymers, deposition technologies (liquid, vapor, and vacuum), colloid and slurry processing, viscous shape forming, and powder consolidation.
K. Kolenbrander
No textbook information available

3.046 Advanced Thermodynamics of Materials
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 3.020 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Explores equilibrium thermodynamics through its application to topics in materials science and engineering. Begins with a fast-paced review of introductory classical and statistical thermodynamics. Students select additional topics to cover; examples include batteries and fuel cells, solar photovoltaics, magnetic information storage, extractive metallurgy, corrosion, thin solid films, and computerized thermodynamics.
R. Jaramillo

3.052 Nanomechanics of Materials and Biomaterials
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 3.013 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Latest scientific developments and discoveries in the field of nanomechanics, i.e. the deformation of extremely tiny (10-9 meters) areas of synthetic and biological materials. Lectures include a description of normal and lateral forces at the atomic scale, atomistic aspects of adhesion, nanoindentation, molecular details of fracture, chemical force microscopy, elasticity of individual macromolecular chains, intermolecular interactions in polymers, dynamic force spectroscopy, biomolecular bond strength measurements, and molecular motors.
C. Ortiz

3.053[J] Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Biomechanics
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Same subject as 2.797[J], 6.4840[J], 20.310[J])
(Subject meets with 2.798[J], 3.971[J], 6.4842[J], 10.537[J], 20.410[J])
Prereq: Biology (GIR) and 18.03
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: TR1-2.30 (4-237) Recitation: TBA
______
Develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales. Topics include structure of tissues and the molecular basis for macroscopic properties; chemical and electrical effects on mechanical behavior; cell mechanics, motility and adhesion; biomembranes; biomolecular mechanics and molecular motors. Experimental methods for probing structures at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
P. So, R. Raman
No textbook information available

3.054 Cellular Solids: Structure, Properties, Applications
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 3.36)
Prereq: 3.013
Units: 3-0-9
______
Discusses processing and structure of cellular solids as they are created from polymers, metals, ceramics, glasses, and composites; derivation of models for the mechanical properties of honeycombs and foams; and how unique properties of honeycombs and foams are exploited in applications such as lightweight structural panels, energy absorption devices, and thermal insulation. Covers applications of cellular solids in medicine, such as increased fracture risk due to trabecular bone loss in patients with osteoporosis, the development of metal foam coatings for orthopedic implants, and designing porous scaffolds for tissue engineering that mimic the extracellular matrix. Includes modelling of cellular materials applied to natural materials and biomimicking. Offers a combination of online and in-person instruction. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

3.055[J] Biomaterials Science and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 20.363[J])
(Subject meets with 3.963[J], 20.463[J])
Prereq: 20.110 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers, at a molecular scale, the analysis and design of materials used in contact with biological systems, and biomimetic strategies aimed at creating new materials based on principles found in biology. Topics include molecular interaction between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, vaccines, and cell-guiding surfaces. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
D. Irvine, K. Ribbeck

3.056[J] Materials Physics of Neural Interfaces
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 9.67[J])
(Subject meets with 3.64[J], 9.670[J])
Prereq: 3.033 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Builds a foundation of physical principles underlying electrical, optical, and magnetic approaches to neural recording and stimulation. Discusses neural recording probes and materials considerations that influence the quality of the signals and longevity of the probes in the brain. Students then consider physical foundations for optical recording and modulation. Introduces magnetism in the context of biological systems. Focuses on magnetic neuromodulation methods and touches upon magnetoreception in nature and its physical limits. Includes team projects that focus on designing electrical, optical, or magnetic neural interface platforms for neuroscience. Concludes with an oral final exam consisting of a design component and a conversation with the instructor. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
P. Anikeeva

3.063 Polymer Physics
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 3.942, 10.568)
Prereq: 3.010
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR11-12.30 (24-115)
______
The mechanical, optical, electrical, and transport properties of polymers and other types of "soft matter" are presented with respect to the underlying physics and physical chemistry of polymers and colloids in solution, and solid states. Topics include how enthalpy and entropy determine conformation, molecular dimensions and packing of polymer chains and colloids and supramolecular materials. Examination of the structure of glassy, crystalline, and rubbery elastic states of polymers; thermodynamics of solutions, blends, crystallization; liquid crystallinity, microphase separation, and self-assembled organic-inorganic nanocomposites. Case studies of relationships between structure and function in technologically important polymeric systems. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
A. Alexander-Katz, G. Rutledge
No textbook information available

3.064 Polymer Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 3.013 and 3.044
Units: 3-0-9
______
Overview of polymer material science and engineering. Treatment of physical and chemical properties, mechanical characterization, processing, and their control through inspired polymer material design.
staff

3.07 Introduction to Ceramics
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: (3.010 and 3.020) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Discusses structure-property relationships in ceramic materials. Includes hierarchy of structures from the atomic to microstructural levels. Defects and transport, solid-state electrochemical processes, phase equilibria, fracture and phase transformations are discussed in the context of controlling properties for various applications of ceramics. Numerous examples from current technology.
Y. Chiang

3.071 Amorphous Materials
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: (3.030 and 3.033) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: MW1-2.30 (4-159)
______
Discusses the fundamental material science behind amorphous solids (non-crystalline materials). Covers formation of amorphous solids; amorphous structures and their electrical and optical properties; and characterization methods and technical applications.
J. Hu
No textbook information available

3.074 Imaging of Materials
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 3.34)
Prereq: 3.033
Units: 3-0-9
______
Principles and applications of (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Topics include electron optics and aberration correction theory; modeling and simulating the interactions of electrons with the specimen; electron diffraction; image formation in transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy; diffraction and phase contrast; imaging of crystals and crystal imperfections; review of the most recent advances in electron microscopy for bio- and nanosciences; analysis of chemical composition and electronic structure at the atomic scale. Lectures complemented by real-case studies and computer simulations/data analysis. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
J. LeBeau

3.080 Strategic Materials Selection
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: (3.010 and 3.020) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides a survey of methods for evaluating choice of material and explores the implications of that choice along economic and environmental dimensions. Topics include life cycle assessment, data uncertainty, manufacturing economics and utility analysis. Students carry out a group project selecting materials technology options based on performance characteristics beyond and including technical ones.
R. Kirchain, E. Olivetti

3.081 Industrial Ecology of Materials
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 3.560)
Prereq: (3.010 and 3.020) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers quantitative techniques to address principles of substitution, dematerialization, and waste mining implementation in materials systems. Includes life-cycle and materials flow analysis of the impacts of materials extraction; processing; use; and recycling for materials, products, and services. Student teams undertake a case study regarding materials and technology selection using the latest methods of analysis and computer-based models of materials process. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
J. Gregory, K. Daehn, A. Arowosola

3.085[J] Venture Engineering
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Same subject as 2.912[J], 15.373[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: MW9.30-11 (9-354)
______
Provides an integrated approach to the development and growth of new innovative ventures. Intended for students who seek to leverage their engineering and science background through innovation-driven entrepreneurship. Emphasizes the concept that innovation-driven entrepreneurs must make a set of interdependent choices under conditions of high uncertainty, and demonstrates that venture engineering involves reducing uncertainty through a structured process of experimental learning and staged commitments. Provides deep understanding of the core technical, customer, and strategic choices and challenges facing start-up innovators, and a synthetic framework for the development and implementation of ventures in dynamic environments.
S. Stern, E. Fitzgerald, B. Aulet
No textbook information available

3.086 Innovation and Commercialization of Materials Technology
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 3.207)
Prereq: None
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: M3.30-5 (4-237)
______
Introduces the fundamental process of innovating and its role in promoting growth and prosperity. Exposes students to innovation through team projects as a structured process, while developing skills to handle multiple uncertainties simultaneously. Provides training to address these uncertainties through research methods in the contexts of materials technology development, market applications, industry structure, intellectual property, and other factors. Case studies place the project in a context of historical innovations with worldwide impact. Combination of projects and real-world cases help students identify how they can impact the world through innovation.
E. Fitzgerald, A. Wankerl
No textbook information available

3.087 Materials, Societal Impact, and Social Innovation
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: 1.050, 2.001, 10.467, (3.010 and 3.020), or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Students work on exciting, team-based projects at the interdisciplinary frontiers of materials research within a societal and humanistic context. Includes topics such as frontier research and inquiry, social innovation, human-centered design thinking, computational design, and additive manufacturing.
C. Ortiz, E. Spero

3.088 The Social Life of Materials
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with EC.988)
Prereq: 1.050, 2.001, 3.010, 10.467, 20.310, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: MW12-1.30 (16-275)
______
Students carry out projects on a material of their choice and study its technical, humanistic, and environmental origins and trajectories of development through historical methods; evaluate its current status within a social and humanistic context; and then imagine and evaluate potential futures. Projects supported by topics and scholarship in sociotechnical systems, social innovation, environmental history and justice, equity-based human-centered design, and futures literacy. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.
C. Ortiz, E. Spero
No textbook information available

3.091 Introduction to Solid-State Chemistry
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Chemistry
Prereq: None
Units: 5-0-7
Credit cannot also be received for 5.111, 5.112, CC.5111, ES.5111, ES.5112
Lecture: MWF12 (37-212) Recitation: TR10 (13-3101) or TR11 (13-3101) or TR1 (13-3101, 13-5101) or TR2 (13-3101) +final
______
Basic principles of chemistry and their application to engineering systems. The relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and atomic order. Characterization of atomic arrangements in crystalline and amorphous solids: metals, ceramics, semiconductors, and polymers. Topical coverage of organic chemistry, solution chemistry, acid-base equilibria, electrochemistry, biochemistry, chemical kinetics, diffusion, and phase diagrams. Examples from industrial practice (including the environmental impact of chemical processes), from energy generation and storage (e.g., batteries and fuel cells), and from emerging technologies (e.g., photonic and biomedical devices).
Fall: P. Anikeeva, A. Gumyusenge
Spring: R. Gomez-Bombarelli, K. Kolenbrander, T. Wallin
No textbook information available

3.094[J] Materials in Human Experience
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as 1.034[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-3-4
Lecture: MW12 (4-237) Lab: M2-5 (4-006) or W2-5 (4-006)
______
Examines how people throughout history have selected, evaluated, processed, and utilized natural materials to create objects of material culture. Explores ideological and aesthetic criteria influential in materials development. As examples of ancient engineering and materials processing, topics may include ancient Roman concrete and prehistoric iron and steel production by the Mossi, Haya, and other African cultures. Particular attention paid to the climate issues surrounding iron and cement, and how the examination of ancient technologies can inform our understanding of sustainability in the present and illuminate paths for the future. Previous topics have included Maya use of lime plaster for frescoes, books, and architectural sculpture; the sound, color, and power of metals in Mesoamerica; and metal, cloth, and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. Laboratory sessions provide practical experience with materials discussed in class. Enrollment limited to 24.
M. Tarkanian, A. Masic, J. Hunter
No textbook information available

3.095 Introduction to Metalsmithing
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Spring) HASS Arts
Prereq: None
Units: 2-3-4
Lecture: TR10 (4-006) Lab: TR11-12.30 (4-006)
______
Exploration of metal arts, design principles, sculptural concepts, and metallurgical processes. Covers traditional fine metalsmithing techniques including soldering, casting, and forming. Students create artworks that interpret lecture material and utilize metalsmithing as a means of expression. Engages a material culture lens to explore ideas of value, aesthetics, and meaning through object-making. Supplemented by visiting artist lectures and arts sector field trips. Limited to 9.
R. Vedro
No textbook information available

3.096 Architectural Ironwork
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Arts
Prereq: None
Units: 2-3-4
______
Explores the use of iron in the built environment throughout history and the world, with an emphasis on traditional European and American design and connections to contemporary movements in art and architecture. Discusses influence of technology on design and fabrication, spanning both ancient and modern developments. Cultivates the ability to design iron in architecture and criticize ironwork as art. Includes laboratory exercises that teach a variety of basic and advanced iron-working techniques such as hand forging and CNC machining. The project-based curriculum begins with art criticism of Cambridge-area ironwork, progresses to practical studies of iron architectural elements, and finishes with creation of an architectural object of the student's design. Associated writing assignments for in-lab projects hone criticism and analysis skills. Limited to 6.
J. Hunter

3.098 Ancient Engineering: Ceramic Technologies
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
(Subject meets with 3.991)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Explores human interaction with ceramic materials over a considerable span of time, from 25,000 years ago to the 16th century AD. Through the lens of modern materials science combined with evidence from archaeological investigations, examines ancient ceramic materials — from containers to architecture to art — to better understand our close relationship with this important class of material culture. Examines ceramics structure, properties, and processing. Introduces archaeological perspectives and discusses how research into historical changes in ancient ceramic technologies has led to a deeper comprehension of past human behavior and societal development. Concludes by considering how studies of ancient technologies and techniques are leading modern materials scientists to engineer designs of modern ceramic materials, including glasses, concretes, and pigments. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
J. Meanwell, W. Gilstrap

3.14 Modern Physical Metallurgy
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 3.40[J], 22.71[J])
Prereq: 3.013 and 3.030
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on the links between the processing, structure, and properties of metals and alloys. First, the physical bases for strength, stiffness, and ductility are discussed with reference to crystallography, defects, and microstructure. Second, phase transformations and microstructural evolution are studied in the context of alloy thermodynamics and kinetics. Together, these components comprise the modern paradigm for designing metallic microstructures for optimized properties. Concludes with a focus on processing-microstructure-property relationships in structural engineering alloys. Students taking the graduate version explore the subject in greater depth.
R. Freitas

3.15 Electrical, Optical, and Magnetic Materials and Devices
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 3.033
Units: 3-0-9
______
Explores the relationships between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural and defect characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. Features a device-motivated approach that places strong emphasis on the design of functional materials for emerging technologies. Applications center around diodes, transistors, memristors, batteries, photodetectors, solar cells (photovoltaics) and solar-to-fuel converters, displays, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical fibers and optical communications, photonic devices, magnetic data storage and spintronics.
K. Kolenbrander

3.152 Magnetic Materials
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 3.45)
Prereq: 3.033
Units: 3-0-9
______
Topics include origin of magnetism in materials, magnetic domains and domain walls, magnetostatics, magnetic anisotropy, antiferro- and ferrimagnetism, magnetism in thin films and nanoparticles, magnetotransport phenomena, and magnetic characterization. Discusses a range of applications, including magnetic recording, spin-valves, and tunnel-junction sensors. Assignments include problem sets and a term paper on a magnetic device or technology. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
C. A. Ross

3.154[J] Materials Performance in Extreme Environments
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 22.054[J])
Prereq: 3.013 and 3.044
Units: 3-2-7
______
Studies the behavior of materials in extreme environments typical of those in which advanced energy systems (including fossil, nuclear, solar, fuel cells, and battery) operate. Takes both a science and engineering approach to understanding how current materials interact with their environment under extreme conditions. Explores the role of modeling and simulation in understanding material behavior and the design of new materials. Focuses on energy and transportation related systems.
Staff

3.155[J] Micro/Nano Processing Technology
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Same subject as 6.2600[J])
Prereq: Calculus II (GIR), Chemistry (GIR), Physics II (GIR), or permission of instructor
Units: 3-4-5
Lecture: MW2.30-4 (66-144) Lab: TBA
______
Introduces the theory and technology of micro/nano fabrication. Includes lectures and laboratory sessions on processing techniques: wet and dry etching, chemical and physical deposition, lithography, thermal processes, packaging, and device and materials characterization. Homework uses process simulation tools to build intuition about higher order effects. Emphasizes interrelationships between material properties and processing, device structure, and the electrical, mechanical, optical, chemical or biological behavior of devices. Students fabricate solar cells, and a choice of MEMS cantilevers or microfluidic mixers. Students formulate their own device idea, either based on cantilevers or mixers, then implement and test their designs in the lab. Students engage in extensive written and oral communication exercises. Course provides background for research work related to micro/nano fabrication. Enrollment limited.
J. Del Alamo
No required or recommended textbooks

3.156 Photonic Materials and Devices
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 3.46)
Prereq: 3.033 and (18.03 or 3.016B)
Units: 3-0-9
______
Optical materials design for semiconductors, dielectrics, organic and nanostructured materials. Ray optics, electromagnetic optics and guided wave optics. Physics of light-matter interactions. Device design principles: LEDs, lasers, photodetectors, solar cells, modulators, fiber and waveguide interconnects, optical filters, and photonic crystals. Device processing: crystal growth, substrate engineering, thin film deposition, etching and process integration for dielectric, silicon and compound semiconductor materials. Micro- and nanophotonic systems. Organic, nanostructured and biological optoelectronics. Assignments include three design projects that emphasize materials, devices and systems applications. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
J. Hu

3.16 Industrial Challenges in Metallic Materials Selection
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 3.39)
Prereq: (3.010 and 3.020) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Advanced metals and alloy design with emphasis in advanced steels and non-ferrous alloys.  Applies physical metallurgy concepts to solve specific problems targeting sustainable, efficient and safer engineered solutions.  Discusses industrial challenges involving metallic materials selection and manufacturing for different value chains and industrial segments. Includes applications in essential segments of modern life, such as transportation, energy and structural applications.  Recognizing steel as an essential engineering material, subject covers manufacturing and end-uses of advanced steels ranging from microalloyed steels to highly alloyed steels.  Also covers materials for very low temperature applications such as superconducting materials and for higher temperature applications such as superalloys. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
staff

3.17 Principles of Manufacturing
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 3.37)
Prereq: 3.010 and 3.020
Units: 2-1-9
______
Teaches the methodology to achieve Six Sigma materials yield: 99.99966% of end products perform within the required tolerance limits. Six Sigma methodology employs five stages for continuous improvement — problem definition, quantification, root cause analysis, solution implementation, and process control  to help engineers evaluate efficiency and assess complex systems. Through case studies, explores classic examples of materials processing problems and the solutions that achieved Six Sigma manufacturing yield throughout the manufacturing system: extraction, design, unit processes, process flow, in-line control, test, performance/qualification, reliability, environmental impact, product life cycle, cost, and workforce. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
L. C. Kimerling

3.171 Structural Materials and Manufacturing
______

Undergrad (Fall, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: (3.010 and 3.020) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Credit cannot also be received for 2.821, 3.371
______
Examines theoretical and practical aspects of structural materials by discussing mechanical properties of materials and manufacturing processes used to convert raw materials into high performance and reliable components for particular applications. Discusses specific types of steel, aluminum, titanium, ceramics, cement, polymers, and composites in context of commercially available product designations and specifications. Examines manufacturing processes used for exemplar products of each type of material, including heat treatments, sintering, and injection molding, among others. Considers established methods of metallurgical failure analysis and fractography through product failure case studies in order to prepare students to determine root causes of component failures in the real world. Students taking graduate version submit additional work. Meets with 3.371 when offered concurrently.
Fall: D. Baskin
Summer: D. Baskin

3.173 Computing Fabrics
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 3.373)
Prereq: 3.013 or permission of instructor
Units: 2-4-6
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Highlights connections between industrialization, products, and advances in fibers and fabrics. Discusses the evolution of technologies in their path from basic scientific research to scaled production and global markets, with the ultimate objective of identifying and investigating the degrees of freedom that make fabrics such a powerful form of synthetic engineering and product expression. Topics explored, in part through interactions with industry speakers, include: fiber, yarn, textiles and fabric materials, structure-property relations, and practical demonstrations to anticipate future textile products. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 20.
Y. Fink

3.18 Materials Science and Engineering of Clean Energy
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 3.70)
Prereq: 3.030 and 3.033
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR1.30-3 (4-261)
______
Develops the materials principles, limitations, and challenges of clean energy technologies, including solar, energy storage, thermoelectrics, fuel cells, and novel fuels. Draws correlations between the limitations and challenges related to key figures of merit and the basic underlying thermodynamic, structural, transport, and physical principles, as well as to the means for fabricating devices exhibiting optimum operating efficiencies and extended life at reasonable cost. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
H. Tuller, I. Abate, Y. Chiang
No required or recommended textbooks

3.19 Sustainable Chemical Metallurgy
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 3.50)
Prereq: 3.030
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers principles of metal extraction processes. Provides a direct application of the fundamentals of thermodynamics and kinetics to the industrial production of metals from their ores, e.g., iron, aluminum, or reactive metals and silicon. Discusses the corresponding economics and global challenges. Addresses advanced techniques for sustainable metal extraction, particularly with respect to greenhouse gas emissions. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
A. Allanore

3.20 Materials at Equilibrium
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: (3.010, 3.013, 3.020, 3.023, 3.030, 3.033, and 3.042) or permission of instructor
Units: 5-0-10
______
Laws of thermodynamics: general formulation and applications to mechanical, electromagnetic and electrochemical systems, solutions, and phase diagrams. Computation of phase diagrams. Statistical thermodynamics and relation between microscopic and macroscopic properties, including ensembles, gases, crystal lattices, phase transitions. Applications to phase stability and properties of mixtures. Representations of chemical equilibria. Interfaces.
A. Allanore, I. Abate

3.201 Introduction to DMSE
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-1 [P/D/F]
______
Introduces new DMSE graduate students to DMSE research groups and the departmental spaces available for research. Guides students in joining a research group. Registration limited to students enrolled in DMSE graduate programs.
R. Macfarlane

3.202 Essential Research Skills
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-1 [P/D/F]
Lecture: M3-5 (E25-117)
______
Provides instruction in the planning, writing, literature review, presentation, and communication of advanced graduate research work. Registration limited to students enrolled in DMSE graduate programs.
C. Tasan
No textbook information available

3.207 Innovation and Commercialization
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 3.086)
Prereq: None
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: M3.30-5 (4-237)
______
Explores in depth projects on a particular materials-based technology. Investigates the science and technology of materials advances and their strategic value, explore potential applications for fundamental advances, and determine intellectual property related to the materials technology and applications. Students map progress with presentations, and are expected to create an end-of-term document enveloping technology, intellectual property, applications, and potential commercialization. Lectures cover aspects of technology, innovation, entrepreneurship, intellectual property, and commercialization of fundamental technologies.
E. Fitzgerald, A. Wankerl
No textbook information available

3.21 Kinetic Processes in Materials
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 3.030, 3.044, (3.010 and 3.020), or permission of instructor
Units: 5-0-10
Lecture: TR9.30-11,F9 (4-231) Recitation: F11 (4-145) or F12 (4-145)
______
Unified treatment of phenomenological and atomistic kinetic processes in materials. Provides the foundation for the advanced understanding of processing, microstructural evolution, and behavior for a broad spectrum of materials. Topics include irreversible thermodynamics; rate and transition state theory, diffusion; nucleation and phase transitions; continuous phase transitions; grain growth and coarsening; capillarity driven morphological evolution; and interface stability during phase transitions.
M. Cima, C. Thompson
No textbook information available

3.22 Structure and Mechanics of Materials
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 3.013 or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
______
Explores structural characteristics of materials focusing on bonding types, crystalline and non-crystalline states, molecular and polymeric materials, and nano-structured materials. Discusses how the macroscale mechanical response of materials, and micro-mechanisms of elasticity, plasticity, and fracture, originate from these structural characteristics. Case studies and examples are drawn from a variety of material classes: metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, composites, and cellular materials.
F. Ross, M. Dao

3.23 Electrical, Optical, and Magnetic Properties of Materials
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 8.03 and 18.03
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: MW1-2.30 (4-231) Recitation: R1 (13-4101) or R2 (13-4101) +final
______
Origin of electrical, magnetic and optical properties of materials. Focus on the acquisition of quantum mechanical tools. Analysis of the properties of materials. Presentation of the postulates of quantum mechanics. Examination of the hydrogen atom, simple molecules and bonds, and the behavior of electrons in solids and energy bands. Introduction of the variation principle as a method for the calculation of wavefunctions. Investigation of how and why materials respond to different electrical, magnetic and electromagnetic fields and probes. Study of the conductivity, dielectric function, and magnetic permeability in metals, semiconductors, and insulators. Survey of common devices such as transistors, magnetic storage media, optical fibers.
J. LeBeau, J. Casamento
No textbook information available

3.30[J] Properties of Solid Surfaces
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 22.75[J])
Prereq: 3.20, 3.21, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers fundamental principles needed to understand and measure the microscopic properties of the surfaces of solids, with connections to structure, electronic, chemical, magnetic and mechanical properties. Reviews the theoretical aspects of surface behavior, including stability of surfaces, restructuring, and reconstruction. Examines the interaction of the surfaces with the environment, including absorption of atoms and molecules, chemical reactions and material growth, and interaction of surfaces with other point defects within the solids (space charges in semiconductors). Discusses principles of important tools for the characterization of surfaces, such as surface electron and x-ray diffraction, electron spectroscopies (Auger and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), scanning tunneling, and force microscopy.
Staff

3.31[J] Radiation Damage and Effects in Nuclear Materials
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 22.74[J])
(Subject meets with 22.074)
Prereq: 3.21, 22.14, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: MW2.30-4 (24-112) +final
______
Studies the origins and effects of radiation damage in structural materials for nuclear applications. Radiation damage topics include formation of point defects, defect diffusion, defect reaction kinetics and accumulation, and differences in defect microstructures due to the type of radiation (ion, proton, neutron). Radiation effects topics include detrimental changes to mechanical properties, phase stability, corrosion properties, and differences in fission and fusion systems. Term project required. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
M. Short
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

3.320 Atomistic Computer Modeling of Materials
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 3.030, 3.20, 3.23, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Theory and application of atomistic computer simulations to model, understand, and predict the properties of real materials. Energy models: from classical potentials to first-principles approaches. Density-functional theory and the total-energy pseudopotential method. Errors and accuracy of quantitative predictions. Thermodynamic ensembles: Monte Carlo sampling and molecular dynamics simulations. Free energies and phase transitions. Fluctations and transport properties. Coarse-graining approaches and mesoscale models.
R. Gomez-Bombarelli

3.321 Computational Materials Design
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 3.041)
Prereq: 3.20
Units: 3-2-7
Lecture: MWF11 (1-134) Lab: R10-12 (1-242)
______
Systems approach to analysis and control of multilevel materials microstructures employing genomic fundamental databases. Applies quantitative process-structure-property-performance relations in computational parametric design of materials composition under processability constraints to achieve predicted microstructures meeting multiple property objectives established by industry performance requirements. Covers integration of macroscopic process models with microstructural simulation to accelerate materials qualification through component-level process optimization and forecasting of manufacturing variation to efficiently define minimum property design allowables. Case studies of interdisciplinary multiphysics collaborative modeling with applications across materials classes. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. 
G. Olson
No textbook information available

3.33[J] Defects in Materials
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 22.73[J])
Prereq: 3.21 and 3.22
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines point, line, and planar defects in structural and functional materials. Relates their properties to transport, radiation response, phase transformations, semiconductor device performance and quantum information processing. Focuses on atomic and electronic structures of defects in crystals, with special attention to optical properties, dislocation dynamics, fracture, and charged defects population and diffusion. Examples also drawn from other systems, e.g., disclinations in liquid crystals, domain walls in ferromagnets, shear bands in metallic glass, etc.
J. Li

3.34 Imaging of Materials
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 3.074)
Prereq: 3.033, 3.23, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Principles and applications of (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Topics include electron optics and aberration correction theory; modeling and simulating the interactions of electrons with the specimen; electron diffraction; image formation in transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy; diffraction and phase contrast; imaging of crystals and crystal imperfections; review of the most recent advances in electron microscopy for bio- and nanosciences; analysis of chemical composition and electronic structure at the atomic scale. Lectures complemented by real-case studies and computer simulations/data analysis. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
J. LeBeau

3.35 Fracture and Fatigue
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 3.22 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Advanced study of material failure in response to mechanical stresses. Damage mechanisms include microstructural changes, crack initiation, and crack propagation under monotonic and cyclic loads. Covers a wide range of materials: metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, biological materials, composites. Describes toughening mechanisms and the effect of material microstructures. Includes stress-life, strain-life, and damage-tolerant approaches. Emphasizes fracture mechanics concepts and latest applications for structural materials, biomaterials, microelectronic components as well as nanostructured materials. Limited to 10.
M. Dao

3.36 Cellular Solids: Structure, Properties, Applications
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 3.054)
Prereq: 3.013 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Discusses processing and structure of cellular solids as they are created from polymers, metals, ceramics, glasses, and composites; derivation of models for the mechanical properties of honeycombs and foams; and how unique properties of honeycombs and foams are exploited in applications such as lightweight structural panels, energy absorption devices, and thermal insulation. Covers applications of cellular solids in medicine, such as increased fracture risk due to trabecular bone loss in patients with osteoporosis, the development of metal foam coatings for orthopedic implants, and designing porous scaffolds for tissue engineering that mimic the extracellular matrix. Includes modelling of cellular materials applied to natural materials and biomimicking. Offers a combination of online and in-person instruction. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

3.37 Principles of Manufacturing
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 3.17)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-1-9
______
Teaches the methodology to achieve Six Sigma materials yield: 99.99966% of end products perform within the required tolerance limits. Six Sigma methodology employs five stages for continuous improvement — problem definition, quantification, root cause analysis, solution implementation, and process control  to help engineers evaluate efficiency and assess complex systems. Through case studies, explores classic examples of materials processing problems and the solutions that achieved Six Sigma manufacturing yield throughout the manufacturing system: extraction, design, unit processes, process flow, in-line control, test, performance/qualification, reliability, environmental impact, product life cycle, cost, and workforce. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
L. C. Kimerling

3.371[J] Structural Materials
______

Graduate (Fall, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
(Same subject as 2.821[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Credit cannot also be received for 3.171
______
Examines theoretical and practical aspects of structural materials by discussing mechanical properties of materials and manufacturing processes used to convert raw materials into high performance and reliable components for particular applications. Discusses specific types of steel, aluminum, titanium, ceramics, cement, polymer,s and composites in context of commercially available product designations and specifications. Examines manufacturing processes used for exemplar products of each type of material, such as heat treatments, sintering, and injection molding, among others. Considers established methods of metallurgical failure analysis and fractography through product failure case studies in order to prepare students to determine root causes of component failures in the real world. Students taking graduate version submit additional work. Meets with 3.171 when offered concurrently.
Fall: D. Baskin
Summer: D. Baskin

3.373 Computing Fabrics
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 3.173)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-4-6
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Highlights connections between industrialization, products, and advances in fibers and fabrics. Discusses the evolution of technologies in their path from basic scientific research to scaled production and global markets, with the ultimate objective of identifying and investigating the degrees of freedom that make fabrics such a powerful form of synthetic engineering and product expression. Topics explored, in part through interactions with industry speakers, include: fiber, yarn, textiles and fabric materials, structure-property relations, and practical demonstrations to anticipate future textile products. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 20.
Y. Fink

3.39 Industrial Challenges in Metallic Materials Selection
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 3.16)
Prereq: 3.20 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Advanced metals and alloy design with emphasis in advanced steels and non-ferrous alloys. Applies physical metallurgy concepts to solve specific problems aiming at sustainable, efficient and safer engineered solutions. Discusses industrial challenges involving metallic materials selection and manufacturing for different value chains and industrial segments. Includes applications in essential segments of modern life such as transportation, energy and strutuctural applications. Recognizing steel as an essential engineering material, the course will cover manufacturing and end-uses of advanced steels ranging from microalloyed steels to highly alloyed steels. Materials for very low temperature applications such as superconducting materials and for higher temperature applications such as superalloys will also be covered. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
staff

3.40[J] Modern Physical Metallurgy
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 22.71[J])
(Subject meets with 3.14)
Prereq: 3.013 and 3.030
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on the links between the processing, structure, and properties of metals and alloys. First, the physical bases for strength, stiffness, and ductility are discussed with reference to crystallography, defects, and microstructure. Second, phase transformations and microstructural evolution are studied in the context of alloy thermodynamics and kinetics. Together, these components comprise the modern paradigm for designing metallic microstructures for optimized properties. Concludes with a focus on processing-microstructure-property relationships in structural engineering alloys. Students taking the graduate version explore the subject in greater depth.
R. Freitas

3.41 Colloids, Surfaces, Absorption, Capillarity, and Wetting Phenomena
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 3.20 and 3.21
Units: 3-0-9
______
Integrates elements of physics and chemistry toward the study of material surfaces. Begins with classical colloid phenomena and the interaction between surfaces in different media. Discusses the mechanisms of surface charge generation as well as how dispersion forces are created and controlled. Continues with exploration of chemical absorption processes and surface design of inorganic and organic materials. Includes examples in which such surface design can be used to control critical properties of materials in applications. Addresses lastly how liquids interact with solids as viewed by capillarity and wetting phenomena. Studies how materials are used in processes and applications that are intended to control liquids, and how the surface chemistry and structure of those materials makes such applications possible.
M. Cima

3.42 Electronic Materials Design
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 3.23
Units: 3-0-9
______
Extensive and intensive examination of structure-processing-property correlations for a wide range of materials including metals, semiconductors, dielectrics, and optical materials. Topics covered include defect equilibria; junction characteristics; photodiodes, light sources and displays; bipolar and field effect transistors; chemical, thermal and mechanical transducers; data storage. Emphasis on materials design in relation to device performance.
H. L. Tuller

3.43[J] Integrated Microelectronic Devices
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 6.6500[J])
Prereq: 3.42 or 6.2500
Units: 4-0-8
______
Covers physics of microelectronic semiconductor devices for integrated circuit applications. Topics include semiconductor fundamentals, p-n junction, metal-oxide semiconductor structure, metal-semiconductor junction, MOS field-effect transistor, and bipolar junction transistor.  Emphasizes physical understanding of device operation through energy band diagrams and short-channel MOSFET device design and modern device scaling. Familiarity with MATLAB recommended.
J. Del Alamo

3.44 Materials Processing for Micro- and Nano-Systems
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 3.20 and 3.21
Units: 3-0-9
______
Processing of bulk, thin film, and nanoscale materials for applications in electronic, magnetic, electromechanical, and photonic devices and microsystems. Topics include growth of bulk, thin-film, nanoscale single crystals via vapor and liquid phase processes; formation, patterning and processing of thin films, with an emphasis on relationships among processing, structure, and properties; and processing of systems of nanoscale materials. Examples from materials processing for applications in high-performance integrated electronic circuits, micro-/nano-electromechanical devices and systems and integrated sensors.
C. Thompson

3.45 Magnetic Materials
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 3.152)
Prereq: 3.23
Units: 3-0-9
______
Topics include origin of magnetism in materials, magnetic domains and domain walls, magnetostatics, anisotropy, antiferro- and ferrimagnetism, magnetization dynamics, spintronics, magnetism in thin films and nanoparticles, magnetotransport phenomena, and magnetic characterization. Discusses a range of applications, including magnetic recording, spintronic memory, magnetoopical devices, and multiferroics. Assignments include problem sets and a term paper on a magnetic device or technology. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
C. Ross

3.46 Photonic Materials and Devices
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 3.156)
Prereq: 3.23
Units: 3-0-9
______
Optical materials design for semiconductors, dielectrics and polymers. Ray optics, electromagnetic optics and guided wave optics. Physics of light-matter interactions. Device design principles: LEDs, lasers, photodetectors, modulators, fiber and waveguide interconnects, optical filters, and photonic crystals. Device processing: crystal growth, substrate engineering, thin film deposition, etching and process integration for dielectric, silicon and compound semiconductor materials. Microphotonic integrated circuits. Telecom/datacom systems. Assignments include three design projects that emphasize materials, devices and systems applications. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
J. Hu

3.48 Measurement Science for Materials Research
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 4-0-8
______
Covers essentials of measurement science, including instrumentation, instrument-computer interfacing, experimental design, calibration and systematic errors, measurement statistics, data representation, and elements of data analysis, including model selection and statistical analysis. Structured around a series of case studies chosen by the class. Options include: electrical and Hall conductivity measurements, semiconductor junction measurements, spectroscopy (including photoluminescence, Raman, and photoelectron), magnetometry, elemental composition analysis and depth profiling, atomic force microscopy, nanoindentation, dynamical correlations and related measurements, and measuring pressure (from ultra-high vacuum to megabar). Familiarity with coding and data analysis required. Specific measurement challenges in the students' own research discussed.
R. Jaramillo


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