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Course 22: Nuclear Science and Engineering
Fall 2024


Plasmas and Controlled Fusion

22.611[J] Introduction to Plasma Physics I
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 8.613[J])
Prereq: (6.2300 or 8.07) and (18.04 or Coreq: 18.075)
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: TR10.30-12 (2-105) +final
______
Introduces plasma phenomena relevant to energy generation by controlled thermonuclear fusion and to astrophysics. Elementary plasma concepts, plasma characterization. Motion of charged particles in magnetic fields. Coulomb collisions, relaxation times, transport processes. Two-fluid hydrodynamic and MHD descriptions. Plasma confinement by magnetic fields, simple equilibrium and stability analysis. Wave propagation in a magnetic field; application to RF plasma heating. Introduction to kinetic theory; Vlasov, Boltzmann and Fokker-Planck equations; relation of fluid and kinetic descriptions. Electron and ion acoustic plasma waves, Landau damping.
J. Hare
No textbook information available

22.612[J] Introduction to Plasma Physics II
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 8.614[J])
Prereq: 22.611
Units: 3-0-9
______
Follow-up to 22.611 provides in-depth coverage of several fundamental topics in plasma physics, selected for their wide relevance and applicability, from fusion to space- and astro-physics. Covers both kinetic and fluid instabilities: two-stream, Weibel, magnetorotational, parametric, ion-temperature-gradient, and pressure-anisotropy-driven instabilities (mirror, firehose). Also covers advanced fluid models, and drift-kinetic and gyrokinetic equations. Special attention to dynamo theory, magnetic reconnection, MHD turbulence, kinetic turbulence, and shocks.
Staff

22.615 MHD Theory of Fusion Systems
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 22.611
Units: 3-0-9
______
Discussion of MHD equilibria in cylindrical, toroidal, and noncircular configurations. MHD stability theory including the Energy Principle, interchange instability, ballooning modes, second region of stability, and external kink modes. Description of current configurations of fusion interest.
Staff

22.617 Plasma Turbulence and Transport
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces plasma turbulence and turbulent transport, with a focus on fusion plasmas. Covers theory of mechanisms for turbulence in confined plasmas, fluid and kinetic equations, and linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic equations; transport due to stochastic magnetic fields, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, and drift wave turbulence; and suppression of turbulence, structure formation, intermittency, and stability thresholds. Emphasis on comparing experiment and theory. Discusses experimental techniques, simulations of plasma turbulence, and predictive turbulence-transport models.
Staff

22.62 Fusion Energy
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 22.611
Units: 3-0-9
______
Basic nuclear physics and plasma physics for controlled fusion. Fusion cross sections and consequent conditions required for ignition and energy production. Principles of magnetic and inertial confinement. Description of magnetic confinement devices: tokamaks, stellarators and RFPs, their design and operation. Elementary plasma stability considerations and the limits imposed. Plasma heating by neutral beams and RF. Outline design of the ITER "burning plasma" experiment and a magnetic confinement reactor.
Staff

22.63 Engineering Principles for Fusion Reactors
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Fusion reactor design considerations: ignition devices, engineering test facilities, and safety/environmental concerns. Magnet principles: resistive and superconducting magnets; cryogenic features. Blanket and first wall design: liquid and solid breeders, heat removal, and structural considerations. Heating devices: radio frequency and neutral beam.
Staff

22.64[J] Ionized Gases
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 16.55[J])
Prereq: 8.02 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: TR9.30-11 (33-319)
______
Properties and behavior of low-temperature plasmas for energy conversion, plasma propulsion, and gas lasers. Equilibrium of ionized gases: energy states, statistical mechanics, and relationship to thermodynamics. Kinetic theory: motion of charged particles, distribution function, collisions, characteristic lengths and times, cross sections, and transport properties. Gas surface interactions: thermionic emission, sheaths, and probe theory. Radiation in plasmas and diagnostics.
C. Guerra Garcia
No textbook information available

22.67[J] Principles of Plasma Diagnostics
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 8.670[J])
Prereq: 22.611
Units: 4-4-4
______
Introduction to the physical processes used to measure the properties of plasmas, especially fusion plasmas. Measurements of magnetic and electric fields, particle flux, refractive index, emission and scattering of electromagnetic waves and heavy particles; their use to deduce plasma parameters such as particle density, pressure, temperature, and velocity, and hence the plasma confinement properties. Discussion of practical examples and assessments of the accuracy and reliability of different techniques.
Staff

Nuclear Materials

22.71[J] Modern Physical Metallurgy
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 3.40[J])
(Subject meets with 3.14)
Prereq: (3.20 and 3.22) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: MW3.30-5 (8-119)
______
Focuses on the links between the processing, structure, and properties of metals and alloys. First, the physical bases for strength, stiffness, and ductility are discussed with reference to crystallography, defects, and microstructure. Second, phase transformations and microstructural evolution are studied in the context of alloy thermodynamics and kinetics. Together, these components comprise the modern paradigm for designing metallic microstructures for optimized properties. Concludes with a focus on processing-microstructure-property relationships in structural engineering alloys. Students taking the graduate version explore the subject in greater depth.
R. Freitas
No textbook information available

22.72 Corrosion: The Environmental Degradation of Materials
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 22.072)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Applies thermodynamics and kinetics of electrode reactions to aqueous corrosion of metals and alloys. Application of advanced computational and modeling techniques to evaluation of materials selection and susceptibility of metal/alloy systems to environmental degradation in aqueous systems. Discusses materials degradation problems in marine environments, oil and gas production, and energy conversion and generation systems, including fossil and nuclear.
Staff

22.73[J] Defects in Materials
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 3.33[J])
Prereq: 3.21 and 3.22
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines point, line, and planar defects in structural and functional materials. Relates their properties to transport, radiation response, phase transformations, semiconductor device performance and quantum information processing. Focuses on atomic and electronic structures of defects in crystals, with special attention to optical properties, dislocation dynamics, fracture, and charged defects population and diffusion. Examples also drawn from other systems, e.g., disclinations in liquid crystals, domain walls in ferromagnets, shear bands in metallic glass, etc.
J. Li

22.74[J] Radiation Damage and Effects in Nuclear Materials
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 3.31[J])
(Subject meets with 22.074)
Prereq: 3.21, 22.14, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Studies the origins and effects of radiation damage in structural materials for nuclear applications. Radiation damage topics include formation of point defects, defect diffusion, defect reaction kinetics and accumulation, and differences in defect microstructures due to the type of radiation (ion, proton, neutron). Radiation effects topics include detrimental changes to mechanical properties, phase stability, corrosion properties, and differences in fission and fusion systems. Term project required. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

22.75[J] Properties of Solid Surfaces
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 3.30[J])
Prereq: 3.20, 3.21, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers fundamental principles needed to understand and measure the microscopic properties of the surfaces of solids, with connections to structure, electronic, chemical, magnetic and mechanical properties. Reviews the theoretical aspects of surface behavior, including stability of surfaces, restructuring, and reconstruction. Examines the interaction of the surfaces with the environment, including absorption of atoms and molecules, chemical reactions and material growth, and interaction of surfaces with other point defects within the solids (space charges in semiconductors). Discusses principles of important tools for the characterization of surfaces, such as surface electron and x-ray diffraction, electron spectroscopies (Auger and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), scanning tunneling, and force microscopy.
Staff

22.76[J] Ionics and Its Applications
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 3.55[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Discusses valence states of ions and how ions and charge move in liquid and solid states. Introduces molten salt systems and how they are used in nuclear energy and processing. Addresses corrosion and the environmental degradation of structural materials. Examines the applications of ionics and electrochemistry in industrial processing, computing, new energy technologies, and recycling and waste treatment.
Staff

22.78[J] Nuclear Energy and the Environment: Waste, Effluents, and Accidents
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 1.878[J])
(Subject meets with 1.098[J], 22.078[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Introduces the essential knowledge for understanding nuclear waste management. Includes material flow sheets for nuclear fuel cycle, waste characteristics, sources of radioactive wastes, compositions, radioactivity and heat generation, chemical processing technologies, geochemistry, waste disposal technologies, environmental regulations and the safety assessment of waste disposal. Covers different types of wastes: uranium mining waste, low-level radioactive waste, high-level radioactive waste and fusion waste. Provides the quantitative methods to compare the environmental impact of different nuclear and other energy-associated waste. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
H. Wainwright

Systems, Policy, and Economics

22.811[J] Sustainable Energy
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 1.818[J], 2.65[J], 10.391[J], 11.371[J])
(Subject meets with 2.650[J], 10.291[J], 22.081[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-1-8
URL: http://web.mit.edu/10.391J/www/
______
Assessment of current and potential future energy systems. Covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting 21st-century regional and global energy needs in a sustainable manner. Examines various energy technologies in each fuel cycle stage for fossil (oil, gas, synthetic), nuclear (fission and fusion) and renewable (solar, biomass, wind, hydro, and geothermal) energy types, along with storage, transmission, and conservation issues. Emphasizes analysis of energy propositions within an engineering, economic and social context. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

22.814[J] Nuclear Weapons and International Security
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 17.474[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 4-0-8
______
Examines the historical, political, and technical contexts for nuclear policy making, including the development of nuclear weapons by states, the evolution of nuclear strategy, the role nuclear weapons play in international politics, the risks posed by nuclear arsenals, and the policies and strategies in place to mitigate those risks. Equal emphasis is given to political and technical considerations affecting national choices. Considers the issues surrounding new non-proliferation strategies, nuclear security, and next steps for arms control.
Staff

General

22.90 Nuclear Science and Engineering Laboratory
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 22.09)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 1-5-9
Add to schedule Lecture: T1 (NW12-222) Lab: T2-4,R1-4 (NW14-1310)
______
See description under subject 22.09.
Staff
No textbook information available

22.901 Independent Project in Nuclear Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
For graduate students who wish to conduct a one-term project of theoretical or experimental nature in the field of nuclear engineering, in close cooperation with individual staff members. Topics and hours arranged to fit students' requirements. Projects require prior approval.
Fall: Contact NSE Academic Office
Spring: Contact NSE Academic Office
Summer: Contact NSE Academic Office
No required or recommended textbooks (Summer 2024); No textbook information available (Fall 2024)

22.911 Seminar in Nuclear Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-1 [P/D/F]
Add to schedule Lab: M4-5.30 (24-112) or T4-5.30 (NW17-218) or W4-5.30 (24-121)
______
Restricted to graduate students engaged in doctoral thesis research.
Fall: C. Forsberg, J. Hare, M. Li
Spring: C. Forsberg, J. Hare, M. Li
No textbook information available

22.912 Seminar in Nuclear Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-1 [P/D/F]
______
Restricted to graduate students engaged in doctoral thesis research.
Staff

22.921 Nuclear Power Plant Dynamics and Control
______

Graduate (IAP)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 1-0-2
______
Introduction to reactor dynamics, including subcritical multiplication, critical operation in absence of thermal feedback effects and effects of xenon, fuel and moderator temperature, etc. Derivation of point kinetics and dynamic period equations. Techniques for reactor control including signal validation, supervisory algorithms, model-based trajectory tracking, and rule-based control. Overview of light-water reactor start-up. Lectures and demonstrations with use of the MIT Research Reactor. Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor.
Staff

22.93 Teaching and Technical Communication Experience in Nuclear Science & Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of department
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
For qualified graduate students interested in teaching as a career or other technical communication intensive careers. Classroom, laboratory, or tutorial teaching under the supervision of a faculty member or instructor. Students selected by interview. Credits for this subject may not be used toward master's or engineer's degrees. Enrollment limited by availability of suitable teaching assignments and NSE communication lab capacity.
Fall: Contact NSE Academic Office
Spring: Contact NSE Academic Office
Summer: Contact NSE Academic Office
No required or recommended textbooks (Summer 2024); No textbook information available (Fall 2024)

22.94 Research in Nuclear Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (IAP) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
For academic research activities in Nuclear Science and Engineering for students who have not completed the NSE doctoral qualifying exam. Hours arranged with and approved by the research advisor. Units may not be used towards advanced degree requirements.
Staff
No required or recommended textbooks

22.95 Internship in Nuclear Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (IAP, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units: 0-1-0 [P/D/F]
______
For Nuclear Science and Engineering students participating in research or curriculum-related off-campus experiences. Before enrolling, students must have an offer from a company or organization. Upon completion, the student must submit a final report or presentation to an approved MIT internship experience advisor, usually the student's thesis advisor or a member of the thesis committee. Subject to departmental approval. Consult the NSE Academic Office for details on procedures and restrictions. Limited to students participating in internships consistent with NSE policies relating to research-related employment.
Staff
No required or recommended textbooks

22.S902-22.S905 Special Subject in Nuclear Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Add to schedule 22.S902: Begins Oct 21. Lecture: F3-5 (24-115)
Add to schedule 22.S903: Lecture: MW11-12.30 (24-112)
______
Seminar or lecture on a topic in nuclear science and engineering that is not covered in the regular curriculum. 22.S905 is graded P/D/F.
P. Ducru
22.S902: No textbook information available
22.S903: No textbook information available

22.THG Graduate Thesis
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Program of research, leading to the writing of an SM, NE, PhD, or ScD thesis; to be arranged by the student and an appropriate MIT faculty member. Consult department graduate office.
Fall: Contact NSE Academic Office
IAP: Contact NSE Academic Office
Spring: Contact NSE Academic Office
Summer: Contact NSE Academic Office
No required or recommended textbooks (Summer 2024); Textbooks arranged individually (Fall 2024)


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Produced: 27-MAY-2024 05:10 PM