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Course 3: Materials Science and Engineering
Fall 2024


3.50 Sustainable Chemical Metallurgy
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 3.19)
Prereq: 3.030 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers principles of metal extraction processes. Provides a direct application of the fundamentals of thermodynamics and kinetics to the industrial production of metals from their ores, e.g. iron, aluminum, or reactive metals and silicon. Discusses the corresponding economics and global challenges. Addresses advanced techniques for sustainable metal extraction, particularly with respect to greenhouse gas emissions. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
A. Allanore

3.53 Electrochemical Processing of Materials
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 3.044
Units: 3-0-6
______
Thermodynamic and transport properties of aqueous and nonaqueous electrolytes. The electrode/electrolyte interface. Kinetics of electrode processes. Electrochemical characterization: d.c. techniques (controlled potential, controlled current), a.c. techniques (voltametry and impedance spectroscopy). Applications: electrowinning, electrorefining, electroplating, and electrosynthesis, as well as electrochemical power sources (batteries and fuel cells).
Staff

3.55[J] Ionics and Its Applications
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 22.76[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Discusses valence states of ions and how ions and charge move in liquid and solid states. Introduces molten salt systems and how they are used in nuclear energy and processing. Addresses corrosion and the environmental degradation of structural materials. Examines the applications of ionics and electrochemistry in industrial processing, computing, new energy technologies, and recycling and waste treatment.
Staff

3.560 Industrial Ecology of Materials
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 3.081)
Prereq: 3.20 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers quantitative techniques to address principles of substitution, dematerialization, and waste mining implementation in materials systems. Includes life-cycle and materials flow analysis of the impacts of materials extraction; processing; use; and recycling for materials, products, and services. Student teams undertake a case study regarding materials and technology selection using the latest methods of analysis and computer-based models of materials process. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
J. Gregory, K. Daehn, A. Arowosola

3.57 Materials Selection, Design, and Economics
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
A survey of techniques for analyzing how the choice of materials, processes, and design determine properties, performance, and cost. Topics include production and cost functions, mathematical optimization, evaluation of single and multi-attribute utility, decision analysis, materials property charts, and performance indices. Students use analytical techniques to develop a plan for starting a new materials-related business.
Staff

3.64[J] Materials Physics of Neural Interfaces
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 9.670[J])
(Subject meets with 3.056[J], 9.67[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Builds a foundation of physical principles underlying electrical, optical, and magnetic approaches to neural recording and stimulation. Discusses neural recording probes and materials considerations that influence the quality of the signals and longevity of the probes in the brain. Students then consider physical foundations for optical recording and modulation. Introduces magnetism in the context of biological systems. Focuses on magnetic neuromodulation methods and touches upon magnetoreception in nature and its physical limits. Includes team projects that focus on designing electrical, optical, or magnetic neural interface platforms for neuroscience. Concludes with an oral final exam consisting of a design component and a conversation with the instructor. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

3.65 Soft Matter Characterization
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on the design and execution of advanced experiments to characterize soft materials, such as synthetic and natural polymers, biological composites, and supramolecular nanomaterials. Each week focuses on a new characterization technique explored through interactive lectures, demonstrations, and practicum sessions in which students gain experience in key experimental aspects of soft matter sample preparation and characterization. Among others, topics include chemical characterization, rheology and viscometry, microscopy, and spectroscopic analyses. Limited to 15.
Staff

3.69 Teaching Fellows Seminar
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-1
______
Provides instruction to help prepare students for teaching at an advanced level and for industry or academic career paths. Topics include preparing a syllabus, selecting a textbook, scheduling assignments and examinations, lecture preparation, "chalk and talk" vs. electronic presentations, academic honesty and discipline, preparation of examinations, grading practices, working with teaching assistants, working with colleagues, mentoring outside the classroom, pursuing academic positions, teaching through technical talks, and successful grant writing strategies.
R. Macfarlane

3.691 Teaching Materials Science and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 0-1-0 [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Provides classroom or laboratory teaching experience under the supervision of faculty member(s). Students assist faculty by preparing instructional materials, leading discussion groups, and monitoring students' progress. Limited to Course 3 undergraduates selected by Teaching Assignments Committee.
Fall: J. Hu
Spring: J. Hu
No textbook information available

3.692 Teaching Materials Science and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Provides classroom or laboratory teaching experience under the supervision of faculty member(s). Students assist faculty by preparing instructional materials, leading discussion groups, and monitoring students' progress. Credit arranged on a case-by-case basis and reviewed by the department. Limited to Course 3 undergraduates selected by Teaching Assignments Committee.
Fall: J. Hu
Spring: J. Hu
No textbook information available

3.694 Teaching Materials Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
Add to schedule 3.693: TBA.
______
Laboratory, tutorial, or classroom teaching under the supervision of a faculty member. Students selected by interview. Enrollment limited by availability of suitable teaching assignments.
R. Macfarlane
3.693: No textbook information available

3.693-3.699 Teaching Materials Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (IAP) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
Add to schedule 3.693: TBA.
______
Laboratory, tutorial, or classroom teaching under the supervision of a faculty member. Students selected by interview. Enrollment limited by availability of suitable teaching assignments.
R. Macfarlane
3.693: No textbook information available

3.70 Materials Science and Engineering of Clean Energy
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 3.18)
Prereq: 3.20, 3.23, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Develops the materials principles, limitations and challenges in clean energy technologies, including solar, energy storage, thermoelectrics, fuel cells, and novel fuels. Draws correlations between the limitations and challenges related to key figures of merit and the basic underlying thermodynamic, structural, transport, and physical principles, as well as to the means for fabricating devices exhibiting optimum operating efficiencies and extended life at reasonable cost. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
H. Tuller, I. Abate, Y. Chiang

3.903[J] Seminar in Polymers and Soft Matter
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
(Same subject as 10.960[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-0 [P/D/F]
Add to schedule Lecture: W3-5 (56-114)
______
A series of seminars covering a broad spectrum of topics in polymer science and engineering, featuring both on- and off-campus speakers.
A. Alexander-Katz
No textbook information available

3.930 Internship Program
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring, Summer)
Prereq: None
Units: 0-6-0 [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Provides academic credit for first approved materials science and engineering internship. For reporting requirements, consult the faculty internship program coordinator. Limited to Course 3 internship track majors.
Fall: A. Allanore
Spring: A. Allanore
Summer: A. Allanore
No textbook information available

3.931 Internship Program
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring, Summer)
Prereq: 3.930
Units: 0-6-0
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Provides academic credit for second approved materials science and engineering internship in the year following completion of 3.930. For reporting requirements consult the faculty internship program coordinator. Limited to Course 3 internship track majors.
Fall: A. Allanore
Spring: A. Allanore
Summer: A. Allanore
No textbook information available

3.932 Industrial Practice
______

Graduate (Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Provides academic credit to graduate students for approved internship assignments at companies/national laboratories. Restricted to DMSE SM or PhD/ScD students.
R. Macfarlane
No textbook information available

3.941[J] Statistical Mechanics of Polymers
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 10.668[J])
Prereq: 10.568 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Concepts of statistical mechanics and thermodynamics applied to macromolecules: polymer conformations in melts, solutions, and gels; Rotational Isomeric State theory, Markov processes and molecular simulation methods applied to polymers; incompatibility and segregation in incompressible and compressible systems; molecular theory of viscoelasticity; relation to scattering and experimental measurements.
G. C. Rutledge, A. Alexander-Katz

3.942 Polymer Physics
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 3.063, 10.568)
Prereq: 3.013 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: TR11-12.30 (4-145)
______
The mechanical, optical, electrical, and transport properties of polymers and other types of "soft matter" are presented with respect to the underlying physics and physical chemistry of polymers and colloids in solution, and solid states. Topics include how enthalpy and entropy determine conformation, molecular dimensions and packing of polymer chains and colloids and supramolecular materials. Examination of the structure of glassy, crystalline, and rubbery elastic states of polymers; thermodynamics of solutions, blends, crystallization; liquid crystallinity, microphase separation, and self-assembled organic-inorganic nanocomposites. Case studies of relationships between structure and function in technologically important polymeric systems. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
A. Alexander-Katz, G. Rutledge
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

3.963[J] Biomaterials Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 20.463[J])
(Subject meets with 3.055[J], 20.363[J])
Prereq: 20.110 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: MW1-2.30 (4-163)
______
Covers, at a molecular scale, the analysis and design of materials used in contact with biological systems, and biomimetic strategies aimed at creating new materials based on principles found in biology. Topics include molecular interaction between bio- and synthetic molecules and surfaces; design, synthesis, and processing approaches for materials that control cell functions; and application of materials science to problems in tissue engineering, drug delivery, vaccines, and cell-guiding surfaces. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
K. Ribbeck
No textbook information available

3.971[J] Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Biomechanics
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 2.798[J], 6.4842[J], 10.537[J], 20.410[J])
(Subject meets with 2.797[J], 3.053[J], 6.4840[J], 20.310[J])
Prereq: Biology (GIR) and 18.03
Units: 3-0-9
______
Develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales. Topics include structure of tissues and the molecular basis for macroscopic properties; chemical and electrical effects on mechanical behavior; cell mechanics, motility and adhesion; biomembranes; biomolecular mechanics and molecular motors. Experimental methods for probing structures at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
P. So, R. Raman

Archaeology and Archaeological Science

3.981 Communities of the Living and the Dead: the Archaeology of Ancient Egypt
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines the development of complex societies in Egypt over a 3000-year period. Uses archaeological and historical sources to determine how and why prehistoric communities coalesced into a long-lived and powerful state. Studies the remains of ancient settlements, tombs, and temples, exploring their relationships to one another and to the geopolitical landscape of Egypt and the Mediterranean world. Considers the development of advanced technologies, rise of social hierarchy, expansion of empire, role of writing, and growth of a complex economy.
Staff

3.982 The Ancient Andean World
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
______
Examines development of Andean civilization which culminated in the extraordinary empire established by the Inka. Archaeological, ethnographic, and ethnohistorical approaches. Particular attention to the unusual topography of the Andean area, its influence upon local ecology, and the characteristic social, political, and technological responses of Andean people to life in a topographically "vertical" world. Characteristic cultural styles of prehistoric Andean life.
staff

3.983 Ancient Mesoamerican Civilization
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
______
Examines origins, florescence and collapse of selected civilizations of ancient Mesoamerica using archaeological and ethnohistoric evidence. Focuses on the Maya, including their hieroglyphic writing. Themes include development of art and architecture, urbanism, religious and political institutions, human-environment interactions, and socio-political collapse. Representations of Maya society in contemporary film and media. Limited to 10.
F. Rossi

3.984 Materials in Ancient Societies I
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-6-3
Add to schedule Lecture: TBA Lab: TBA
______
Seminars and labs provide in-depth study of the technologies ancient societies used to produce objects from raw materials. Seminars cover basic materials science and engineering concepts and techniques that can be used to understand how materials were produced and used in the past. The materials selection and processing are then linked to the environment, exchange, political power, and cultural values. The specific material covered each year rotates and may include ceramics, metals, stone, glass, or bones/organic materials. Contact the instructor for more information about the material covered each year.
A. Allanore, J. Meanwell, W. Gilstrap
No textbook information available

3.985[J] Archaeological Science
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as 5.24[J], 12.011[J])
Prereq: Chemistry (GIR) or Physics I (GIR)
Units: 3-1-5
______
Pressing issues in archaeology as an anthropological science. Stresses the natural science and engineering methods archaeologists use to address these issues. Reconstructing time, space, and human ecologies provides one focus; materials technologies that transform natural materials to material culture provide another. Topics include 14C dating, ice core and palynological analysis, GIS and other remote sensing techniques for site location, organic residue analysis, comparisons between Old World and New World bronze production, invention of rubber by Mesoamerican societies, analysis and conservation of Dead Sea Scrolls.
J. Meanwell, M. Tarkanian

3.986[J] The Human Past: Introduction to Archaeology
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences Communication Intensive HASS
(Same subject as 21A.503[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: TR3 (4-231) Recitation: T4 (4-261) or R4 (4-261)
______
From an archaeological perspective, examines ancient human activities and the forces that shaped them. Draws on case studies from the Old and/or New World. Exposes students to various classes of archaeological data, such as stone, bone, and ceramics, that help reconstruct the past.
F. Rossi
No textbook information available

3.987 Human Evolution: Data from Palaeontology, Archaeology, and Materials Science
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-2-7
______
Examines human physical and cultural evolution over the past five million years via lectures and labs that incorporate data from human palaeontology, archaeology, and materials science. Topics include the evolution of hominin morphology and adaptations; the nature and structure of bone and its importance in human evolution; and the fossil and archaeological evidence for human behavioral and cultural evolution, from earliest times through the Pleistocene. Laboratory sessions include study of stone technology, artifacts, and fossil specimens.
F. Rossi

3.988 Maya City Building: Materials, Technology, and Ecology in an Ancient Society
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Explores relationship between archaeology and materials science, and the potential to methodologically connect these fields. Taking ancient Maya society as an archaeological case study, surveys 13 materials utilized by Indigenous Maya peoples before European contact. Focuses on the modes of materials analysis used in archaeology, as well as experimental methods in which ancient technologies are replicated and approached as windows into human social, political and economic systems. In dialogue with community archaeology, class discussions and material explorations are shaped by questions offered by Maya craftspeople and descendent communities of experts today. 
Staff

3.989 Materials in Ancient Societies II
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 3.984 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-6-3
______
Additional seminars and laboratory analysis of archaeological artifacts. Seminars cover broader archaeological questions related to human/material interactions. Builds on 3.984.
A. Allanore, J. Meanwell, W. Gilstrap

3.990 Seminar in Archaeological Method and Theory
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 3.985, 3.986, and 21A.00
Units: 3-0-6
______
Designed for undergraduate seniors majoring in Archaeology and Materials. Critical analysis of major intellectual and methodological developments in American archaeology, including evolutionary theory, the "New Archaeology," Marxism, formal and ideological approaches. Explores the use of science and engineering methods to reconstruct cultural patterns from archaeological data. Seminar format, with formal presentations by all students. Non-majors fulfilling all prerequisites may enroll by permission of instructors. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication provided.
staff

3.991 Ancient Engineering: Ceramic Technologies
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 3.098)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: MWF3 (56-154)
______
Explores human interaction with ceramic materials over a considerable span of time, from 25,000 years ago to the 16th century AD. Through the lens of modern materials science combined with evidence from archaeological investigations, examines ancient ceramic materials — from containers to architecture to art — to better understand our close relationship with this important class of material culture. Examines ceramics structure, properties, and processing. Introduces archaeological perspectives and discusses how research into historical changes in ancient ceramic technologies has led to a deeper comprehension of past human behavior and societal development. Concludes by considering how studies of ancient technologies and techniques are leading modern materials scientists to engineer designs of modern ceramic materials, including glasses, concretes, and pigments. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
J. Meanwell, W. Gilstrap
No textbook information available

3.993 Archaeology of the Middle East
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
______
Explores the long history of the Middle East and its role as an enduring center of civilization and human thought. Beginning over 100,000 years ago and ending up in the present day, tackles major issues in the human career through examination of archaeological and written materials. Students track the course of human development in the Middle East, from hunting and gathering to cities and empires.
staff

3.995 First Year Thesis Research
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: None. Coreq: 3.202; permission of instructor
Units arranged [P/D/F]
______
Preparation for program of research leading to the writing of an SM, PhD, or ScD thesis; to be arranged by the student and an appropriate MIT faculty member. Includes research presentation, in coordination with 3.202.
R. Macfarlane

3.997 Graduate Fieldwork in Materials Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Program of field research in materials science and engineering leading to the writing of an SM, PhD, or ScD thesis; to be arranged by the student and an appropriate MIT faculty member.
Fall: staff
Spring: staff
Summer: staff
No textbook information available

3.998 Doctoral Thesis Update Meeting
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring)
Prereq: None
Units: 0-1-0 [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Thesis research update presentation to the thesis committee. Held the first or second academic term after successfully passing the Thesis Area Examination.
Fall: R. Macfarlane
Spring: R. Macfarlane
No textbook information available

3.C01[J] Machine Learning for Molecular Engineering
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Same subject as 10.C01[J], 20.C01[J])
(Subject meets with 3.C51[J], 7.C01, 7.C51, 10.C51[J], 20.C51[J])
Prereq: Calculus II (GIR) and 6.100A; Coreq: 6.C01
Units: 2-0-4
Credit cannot also be received for 1.C01, 1.C51, 2.C01, 2.C51, 3.C51, 7.C01, 7.C51, 10.C51, 20.C51, 22.C01, 22.C51, SCM.C51
______
Building on core material in 6.C01, provides an introduction to the use of machine learning to solve problems arising in the science and engineering of biology, chemistry, and materials. Equips students to design and implement machine learning approaches to challenges such as analysis of omics (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, etc.), microscopy, spectroscopy, or crystallography data and design of new molecules and materials such as drugs, catalysts, polymer, alloys, ceramics, and proteins. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Students cannot receive credit without simultaneous completion of 6.C01.
R. Gomez-Bombarelli, C. Coley, E. Fraenkel, J. Davis

3.C27[J] Computational Imaging: Physics and Algorithms
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.C27[J], 6.C27[J])
(Subject meets with 2.C67[J], 3.C67[J], 6.C67[J])
Prereq: 18.C06 and (1.00, 1.000, 2.086, 3.019, or 6.100A)
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: MW11-12.30 (24-121)
______
Explores the contemporary computational understanding of imaging: encoding information about a physical object onto a form of radiation, transferring the radiation through an imaging system, converting it to a digital signal, and computationally decoding and presenting the information to the user. Introduces a unified formulation of computational imaging systems as a three-round "learning spiral": the first two rounds describe the physical and algorithmic parts in two exemplary imaging systems. The third round involves a class project on an imaging system chosen by students. Undergraduate and graduate versions share lectures but have different recitations. Involves optional "clinics" to even out background knowledge of linear algebra, optimization, and computational imaging-related programming best practices for students of diverse disciplinary backgrounds. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
G. Barbastathis
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

3.C51[J] Machine Learning for Molecular Engineering
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 10.C51[J], 20.C51[J])
(Subject meets with 3.C01[J], 7.C01, 7.C51, 10.C01[J], 20.C01[J])
Prereq: Calculus II (GIR) and 6.100A; Coreq: 6.C51
Units: 2-0-4
Credit cannot also be received for 1.C01, 1.C51, 2.C01, 2.C51, 3.C01, 7.C01, 7.C51, 10.C01, 20.C01, 22.C01, 22.C51, SCM.C51
______
Building on core material in 6.C51, provides an introduction to the use of machine learning to solve problems arising in the science and engineering of biology, chemistry, and materials. Equips students to design and implement machine learning approaches to challenges such as analysis of omics (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, etc.), microscopy, spectroscopy, or crystallography data and design of new molecules and materials such as drugs, catalysts, polymer, alloys, ceramics, and proteins. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Students cannot receive credit without simultaneous completion of 6.C51.
R. Gomez-Bombarelli, C. Coley, E. Fraenkel, J. Davis

3.C67[J] Computational Imaging: Physics and Algorithms
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.C67[J], 6.C67[J])
(Subject meets with 2.C27[J], 3.C27[J], 6.C27[J])
Prereq: 18.C06 and (1.00, 1.000, 2.086, 3.019, or 6.100A)
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: MW11-12.30 (24-121)
______
Contemporary understanding of imaging is computational: encoding onto a form of radiation the information about a physical object, transferring the radiation through the imaging system, converting it to a digital signal, and computationally decoding and presenting the information to the user. This class introduces a unified formulation of computational imaging systems as a three-round "learning spiral": the first two rounds, instructors describe the physical and algorithmic parts in two exemplary imaging systems. The third round, students conduct themselves as the class project on an imaging system of their choice. The undergraduate and graduate versions share lectures but have different recitations. Throughout the term, we also conduct optional "clinics" to even out background knowledge of linear algebra, optimization, and computational imaging-related programming best practices for students of diverse disciplinary backgrounds.
G. Barbastathis
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

3.EPE UPOP Engineering Practice Experience
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 1.EPE, 2.EPE, 3.EPE, 6.EPE, 8.EPE, 10.EPE, 15.EPE, 16.EPE, 20.EPE, 22.EPE)
Prereq: None
Units: 0-0-1 [P/D/F]
Add to schedule Lab: M11 (3-333) or M1 (3-442) or W11 (3-333) or W1 (3-133) or F11 (3-333) or F1 (37-212)
______
Provides students with skills to prepare for and excel in the world of industry. Emphasizes practical application of career theory and professional development concepts. Introduces students to relevant and timely resources for career development, provides students with tools to embark on a successful internship search, and offers networking opportunities with employers and MIT alumni. Students work in groups, led by industry mentors, to improve their resumes and cover letters, interviewing skills, networking abilities, project management, and ability to give and receive feedback. Objective is for students to be able to adapt and contribute effectively to their future employment organizations. A total of two units of credit is awarded for completion of the fall and subsequent spring term offerings. Application required; consult UPOP website for more information.
Fall: D. Fordell, C. Greaney
Spring: D. Fordell, C. Greaney
No textbook information available

3.EPW UPOP Engineering Practice Workshop
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring)
Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject.
(Offered under: 1.EPW, 2.EPW, 3.EPW, 6.EPW, 10.EPW, 16.EPW, 20.EPW, 22.EPW)
Prereq: 2.EPE
Units: 1-0-0 [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Provides sophomores across all majors with opportunities to develop and practice communication, teamwork, and problem-solving skills to become successful professionals in the workplace, particularly in preparation for their summer industry internship. This immersive, multi-day Team Training Workshop (TTW) is comprised of experiential learning modules focused on expanding skills in areas that employers report being most valuable in the workplace. Modules are led by MIT faculty with the help of MIT alumni and other senior industry professionals. Skills applied through creative simulations, team problem-solving challenges, oral presentations, and networking sessions with prospective employers. Enrollment limited to those in the UPOP program.
Fall: S. Creesy
IAP: C. Greaney
Spring: C. Greaney
No textbook information available

3.S01 Special Subject in Materials Science and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Lecture, seminar, or laboratory consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter.
Staff

3.S02 Special Subject in Materials Science and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Lecture, seminar, or laboratory consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter.
Staff

3.S03 Special Subject in Materials Science and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Lecture, seminar, or laboratory consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter.
Staff

3.S04 Special Subject in Materials Science and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Lecture, seminar, or laboratory consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter.
Staff

3.S05 Special Subject in Materials Science and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Lecture, seminar, or laboratory consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter.
D. Baskin

3.S06 Special Subject in Materials Science and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Lecture, seminar, or laboratory consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects.
S. Hudson

3.S07 Special Subject in Materials Science and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Lecture, seminar, or laboratory consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter.
Staff

3.S08 Special Subject in Materials Science and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Lecture, seminar, or laboratory consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter.
Fall: R. Gomez-Bombarelli
Spring: R. Gomez-Bombarelli
No textbook information available

3.S09 Special Subject in Materials Science and Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged [P/D/F]
______
Lecture, seminar, or laboratory consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter.
Staff

3.S70 Special Subject in Materials Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Covers advanced topics in Materials Science and Engineering that are not included in the permanent curriculum.
Staff

3.S71 Special Subject in Materials Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Covers advanced topics in Materials Science and Engineering that are not included in the permanent curriculum.
staff

3.S72 Special Subject in Materials Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Covers advanced topics in Materials Science and Engineering that are not included in the permanent curriculum.
Staff

3.S74 Special Subject in Materials Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Covers advanced topics in Materials Science and Engineering that are not included in the permanent curriculum.
Staff

3.S75 Special Subject in Materials Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Covers advanced topics in Materials Science and Engineering that are not included in the permanent curriculum.
D. Baskin

3.S76-3.S79 Special Subject in Materials Science and Engineering
______

Graduate (IAP)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged [P/D/F]
______
Covers advanced topics in Materials Science and Engineering that are not included in the permanent curriculum.
Staff

3.THG Graduate Thesis
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Program of research leading to the writing of an SM, PhD, or ScD thesis; to be arranged by the student and an appropriate MIT faculty member.
R. Macfarlane
Textbooks arranged individually

3.THU Undergraduate Thesis
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Program of research leading to the writing of an SB thesis; to be arranged by the student and an appropriate MIT faculty member. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication.
J. Hu
Textbooks arranged individually

3.UAR[J] Climate and Sustainability Undergraduate Advanced Research
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
(Same subject as 1.UAR[J], 5.UAR[J], 11.UAR[J], 12.UAR[J], 15.UAR[J], 22.UAR[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
Add to schedule Lecture: MW4 (48-316)
______
Provides instruction in effective research, experiential projects, internships, and externships, including choosing and refining problems, surveying previous work and publications, industry best practices, design for robustness, technical presentation, authorship and collaboration, and ethics. Supporting content includes background and context pertaining to climate change and sustainability, as well as tools for sustainable design. Focus for project work includes research topics relevant to the MIT Climate & Sustainability Consortium (MCSC). Students engage in extensive written and oral communication exercises, in the context of an approved advanced research project. A total of 12 units of credit is awarded for completion of the spring and subsequent fall term offerings. Application required; consult MCSC website for more information.
Fall: D. Plata
Spring: D. Plata
No textbook information available

3.UR Undergraduate Research
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Extended participation in work of a research group. Independent study of literature, direct involvement in group's research (commensurate with student skills), and project work under an individual faculty member. See UROP coordinator for registration procedures.
Fall: staff
IAP: staff
Spring: staff
Summer: staff
Textbooks arranged individually

3.URG Undergraduate Research
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Extended participation in work of a research group. Independent study of literature, direct involvement in group's research (commensurate with student skills), and project work under an individual faculty member. See UROP coordinator for registration procedures.
Fall: staff
IAP: staff
Spring: staff
Summer: staff
Textbooks arranged individually


left arrow | 3.00-3.499 | 3.50-3.999 plus UROP, UPOP, and Thesis | right arrow



Produced: 22-JUL-2024 05:10 PM