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Course 5: Chemistry
Fall 2024


5.000[J] Dimensions of Geoengineering
______

Graduate (Fall); first half of term
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 1.850[J], 10.600[J], 11.388[J], 12.884[J], 15.036[J], 16.645[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4
______
Familiarizes students with the potential contributions and risks of using geoengineering technologies to control climate damage from global warming caused by greenhouse gas emissions. Discusses geoengineering in relation to other climate change responses: reducing emissions, removing CO2 from the atmosphere, and adapting to the impacts of climate change. Limited to 100.
J. Deutch, M. Zuber

5.002[J] Viruses, Pandemics, and Immunity
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 10.380[J], HST.438[J])
(Subject meets with 5.003[J], 8.245[J], 10.382[J], HST.439[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-1
______
Covers the history of infectious diseases, basics of virology, immunology, and epidemiology, and ways in which diagnostic tests, vaccines, and antiviral therapies are currently designed and manufactured. Examines the origins of inequities in infection rates in society, and issues pertinent to vaccine safety. Final project explores how to create a more pandemic-resilient world. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first-year students. Preference to first-year students; all others should take HST.439.
A. Chakraborty

5.003[J] Viruses, Pandemics, and Immunity
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 8.245[J], 10.382[J], HST.439[J])
(Subject meets with 5.002[J], 10.380[J], HST.438[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-1
______
Covers the history of infectious diseases, basics of virology, immunology, and epidemiology, and ways in which diagnostic tests, vaccines, and antiviral therapies are currently designed and manufactured. Examines the origins of inequities in infection rates in society, and issues pertinent to vaccine safety. Final project explores how to create a more pandemic-resilient world. HST.438 intended for first-year students; all others should take HST.439.
A. Chakraborty

5.009[J] Ocean Chemistry Change Laboratory
(New)
______

Undergrad (Spring) Partial Lab; first half of term
(Same subject as 12.314[J])
Prereq: Chemistry (GIR)
Units: 1-3-2
______
Introduces marine chemistry and explores how human activity is aggressively modifying Earth's climate system. Familiarizes students with instrumentation, techniques, and concepts utilized to investigate the ocean. Through lab work, students apply general chemistry principles to marine systems and develop new understanding of specific research problems within ocean chemistry and biogeochemistry. Satisfies 3 units of Institute Laboratory credit.
Staff

5.03 Principles of Inorganic Chemistry I
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 5.12
Units: 5-0-7
______
Presents principles of chemical bonding and molecular structure, and their application to the chemistry of representative elements of the periodic system.
R. Gilliard, D. Suess

5.04 Principles of Inorganic Chemistry II
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: 5.03
Units: 4-0-8
Add to schedule Lecture: MWF10 (2-105) Recitation: F2 (4-257)
______
Systematic presentation of the chemical applications of group theory. Emphasis on the formal development of the subject and its applications to the physical methods of inorganic chemical compounds. Against the backdrop of electronic structure, the electronic, vibrational, and magnetic properties of transition metal complexes are presented and their investigation by the appropriate spectroscopy described.
Y. Surendranath, D. Freedman
No textbook information available

5.05 Principles of Inorganic Chemistry III
______

Graduate (Fall); second half of term
Prereq: 5.03; Coreq: 5.04
Units: 2-0-4
Add to schedule Begins Oct 21. Lecture: TR9-10.30 (4-153) +final
______
Principles of main group (s and p block) element chemistry with an emphasis on synthesis, structure, bonding, and reaction mechanisms.
R. Gilliard
No textbook information available

5.061 Principles of Organometallic Chemistry
______

Graduate (Spring); first half of term
Prereq: 5.03
Units: 2-0-4
______
A comprehensive treatment of organometallic compounds of the transition metals with emphasis on structure, bonding, synthesis, and mechanism.
C. Cummins

5.062 Principles of Bioinorganic Chemistry
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall); first half of term
Prereq: 5.03
Units: 2-0-4
______
Delineates principles that form the basis for understanding how metal ions function in biology. Examples chosen from recent literature on a range of topics, including the global biogeochemical cycles of the elements; choice, uptake and assembly of metal-containing units; structure, function and biosynthesis of complex metallocofactors; electron-transfer and redox chemistry; atom and group transfer chemistry; protein tuning of metal properties; metalloprotein engineering and design; and applications to diagnosis and treatment of disease.
D. Suess

5.064 Solid-state Materials Chemistry
______

Graduate (Spring); second half of term
Prereq: 5.03
Units: 3-0-3
______
Fundamentals of materials chemistry with a focus on solid-state materials. Builds upon ideas of band structure from a chemical perspective and progresses to physical properties, including magnetism and conductivity. 
D. Freedman

5.065 Electrochemistry
______

Graduate (Spring); first half of term
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-3
______
Fundamentals of electrochemistry with an emphasis on physical principles, experimental techniques, and select applications. Builds from molecular-level theories of charge transfer reactions and double layer structure and progress to the use of electrochemistry as a method for characterizing redox properties, synthesizing materials, and interconverting electrical and chemical energy. Background in organic chemistry required.
Staff

5.067 Crystal Structure Refinement
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 5.069 or permission of instructor
Units: 2-3-1
Add to schedule Lecture: W2-4 (26-322) Lab: R1-4 (26-322)
______
Practical aspects of crystal structure determination from data collection strategies to data reduction and basic and advanced refinement problems of organic and inorganic molecules.
P. Mueller
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

5.068 Physical Inorganic Chemistry
______

Graduate (Spring); second half of term
Prereq: 5.03 and 5.04
Units: 3-0-3
______
Discusses the physical methods used to probe the electronic and geometric structures of inorganic compounds, with additional techniques employed in the characterization of inorganic solids and surfaces. Includes vibrational spectroscopy, solid state and solution magnetochemical methods, Mossbauer spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, electrochemical methods, and a brief survey of surface techniques. Applications to current research problems in inorganic and solid-state chemistry.
M. Dinca

5.069 Crystal Structure Analysis
______

Graduate (Spring); first half of term
Prereq: 5.03 and 5.04
Units: 2-0-4
______
Introduction to X-ray crystallography: symmetry in real and reciprocal space, space and Laue groups, geometry of diffraction, structure factors, phase problem, direct and Patterson methods, electron density maps, structure refinement, crystal growth, powder methods, limits of diffraction methods, structure data bases.
P. Mueller

5.07[J] Introduction to Biological Chemistry
______

Undergrad (Fall) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
(Same subject as 20.507[J])
Prereq: 5.12
Units: 5-0-7
Credit cannot also be received for 7.05
Add to schedule Lecture: MWF9 (2-105) Recitation: TR10 (36-144) or TR11 (36-144) or TR2 (36-144) or TR3 (36-144) +final
______
Chemical and physical properties of the cell and its building blocks. Structures of proteins and principles of catalysis. The chemistry of organic/inorganic cofactors required for chemical transformations within the cell. Basic principles of metabolism and regulation in pathways, including glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, fatty acid synthesis/degradation, pentose phosphate pathway, Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation, DNA replication, and transcription and translation.
X. Wang, O. Johnson
No textbook information available

5.08[J] Fundamentals of Chemical Biology
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Same subject as 7.08[J])
(Subject meets with 7.80)
Prereq: (Biology (GIR), 5.13, and (5.07 or 7.05)) or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
______
Spanning the fields of biology, chemistry, and engineering, this class introduces students to the principles of chemical biology and the application of chemical and physical methods and reagents to the study and manipulation of biological systems. Topics include nucleic acid structure, recognition, and manipulation; protein folding and stability, and proteostasis; bioorthogonal reactions and activity-based protein profiling; chemical genetics and small-molecule inhibitor screening; fluorescent probes for biological analysis and imaging; and unnatural amino acid mutagenesis. The class will also discuss the logic of dynamic post-translational modification reactions with an emphasis on chemical biology approaches for studying complex processes including glycosylation, phosphorylation, and lipidation. Students taking the graduate version are expected to explore the subject in greater depth.
B. Imperiali, R. Raines

5.111 Principles of Chemical Science
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Chemistry
Prereq: None
Units: 5-0-7
Credit cannot also be received for 3.091, 5.112, CC.5111, ES.5111, ES.5112
Add to schedule Lecture: MWF12 (10-250) Recitation: TR11 (36-155) or TR12 (26-168, 36-112, 8-205, 56-180, 26-142, 36-144, 24-307) or TR1 (2-142) or TR2 (56-180) or TR1 (36-112, 36-153) or TR2 (36-155, 36-112, 56-191) or TR11 (26-168) or TR2 (36-153, 8-119) or TR11 (56-169, 38-166) or TR12 (36-155) +final
______
Introduction to chemistry, with emphasis on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. Introduction to the chemistry of biological, inorganic, and organic molecules.
Fall: B. McGuire, M. Shoulders
Spring: A. Willard, M. Hong
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

5.112 Principles of Chemical Science
______

Undergrad (Fall) Chemistry
Prereq: None
Units: 5-0-7
Credit cannot also be received for 3.091, 5.111, CC.5111, ES.5111, ES.5112
Add to schedule Lecture: MWF11 (32-155) Recitation: TR11 (36-372) or TR12 (36-372, 38-166) or TR2 (36-372) +final
______
Introduction to chemistry for students who have taken two or more years of high school chemistry or who have earned a score of at least 4 on the ETS Advanced Placement Exam.  Emphasis on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. Applications of basic principles to problems in metal coordination chemistry, organic chemistry, and biological chemistry.
S. Ceyer, C. Cummins
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

5.12 Organic Chemistry I
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
Prereq: Chemistry (GIR)
Units: 5-0-7
Credit cannot also be received for CC.512
Add to schedule Lecture: MWF12 (32-123) Recitation: TR9 (56-169) or TR10 (56-169) or TR12 (13-1143, 24-112, 56-169) or TR1 (13-1143) or TR2 (4-257) or MW2 (26-142) +final
______
Introduction to organic chemistry. Development of basic principles to understand the structure and reactivity of organic molecules. Emphasis on substitution and elimination reactions and chemistry of the carbonyl group. Introduction to the chemistry of aromatic compounds.
Fall: J. Johnson, A. Wendlandt
Spring: R. Danheiser
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

5.13 Organic Chemistry II
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: 5.12
Units: 5-0-7
Add to schedule Lecture: MWF12 (4-370) Recitation: MW2 (36-153) or TR3 (38-166, 36-372) or MW3 (36-153) or TR9 (36-112, 36-372, 36-155) or TR12 (4-159, 8-119) or TR1 (38-166) or TR2 (38-166) +final
______
Focuses on synthesis, structure determination, mechanism, and the relationships between structure and reactivity. Selected topics illustrate the role of organic chemistry in biological systems and in the chemical industry.
M. Elkin, S. Buchwald
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

5.24[J] Archaeological Science
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as 3.985[J], 12.011[J])
Prereq: Chemistry (GIR) or Physics I (GIR)
Units: 3-1-5
______
Pressing issues in archaeology as an anthropological science. Stresses the natural science and engineering methods archaeologists use to address these issues. Reconstructing time, space, and human ecologies provides one focus; materials technologies that transform natural materials to material culture provide another. Topics include 14C dating, ice core and palynological analysis, GIS and other remote sensing techniques for site location, organic residue analysis, comparisons between Old World and New World bronze production, invention of rubber by Mesoamerican societies, analysis and conservation of Dead Sea Scrolls.
J. Meanwell, M. Tarkanian

5.301 Chemistry Laboratory Techniques
______

Undergrad (IAP)
Prereq: Chemistry (GIR) and permission of instructor
Units: 1-4-1 [P/D/F]
______
Practical training in basic chemistry laboratory techniques. Intended to provide students with the skills necessary to undertake original research projects in chemistry. Limited to first-year students in IAP (application required); open to all students in spring (enrollment by lottery).
J. Dolhun, P. Venkatesan

5.302 Introduction to Experimental Chemistry
______

Undergrad (IAP); partial term
Prereq: None
Units: 0-3-0 [P/D/F]
______
Illustrates fundamental principles of chemical science through practical experience with chemical phenomena. Students explore the theoretical concepts of chemistry through the experiments which informed their discovery, and make chemistry happen with activities that are intellectually stimulating and fun. Preference to first-year students.
P. Venkatesan

5.310 Laboratory Chemistry
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Institute Lab
Prereq: None. Coreq: 5.12
Units: 2-7-3
Add to schedule Safety lecture mandatory. MW sections on 9/4 at 1 pm. TR sections on 9/5 at 1 pm. See course for the link. Lecture: TR12 (4-370) Lab: MW1-5 (12-5170B) or TR1-5 (12-5170B)
______
Introduces experimental chemistry for students who are not majoring in Course 5. Principles and applications of chemical laboratory techniques, including preparation and analysis of chemical materials, measurement of pH, gas and liquid chromatography, visible-ultraviolet spectrophotometry, infrared spectroscopy, kinetics, data analysis, and elementary synthesis, are described, in addition to experimental design principles. Includes instruction and practice in written and oral communication to multiple audiences. Enrollment limited.
Fall: P. Venkatesan
Spring: P. Venkatesan
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

5.351 Fundamentals of Spectroscopy
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Partial Lab; partial term
Prereq: Chemistry (GIR)
Units: 1-2-1
Add to schedule Safety lecture mandatory. MW sections on 9/4 at 1 pm. TR sections on 9/5 at 1 pm. See course for the link. Meets 9/9 to 10/1. Lecture: TR12 (4-231) Lab: MW1-5 (12-5170B) or TR1-5 (12-5170B)
______
Students carry out an experiment that introduces fundamental principles of the most common types of spectroscopy, including UV-visible absorption and fluorescence, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Emphasizes principles of how light interacts with matter, a fundamental and hands-on understanding of how spectrometers work, and what can be learned through spectroscopy about prototype molecules and materials. Students record and analyze spectra of small organic molecules, native and denatured proteins, semiconductor quantum dots, and laser crystals. Satisfies 4 units of Institute Laboratory credit.
Fall: J. Dolhun, K. Nelson
Spring: J. Dolhun, K. Nelson
No textbook information available

5.352 Synthesis of Coordination Compounds and Kinetics
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Partial Lab; partial term
Prereq: None. Coreq: 5.351
Units: 1-2-2
Add to schedule Safety lecture mandatory. MW sections on 9/4 at 1 pm. TR sections on 9/5 at 1 pm. See course for the link. Meets 10/7 to 10/31. Lecture: TR12 (4-231) Lab: MW1-5 (12-5170B) or TR1-5 (12-5170B)
______
Students carry out an experiment that provides an introduction to the synthesis of simple coordination compounds and chemical kinetics. Illustrates cobalt coordination chemistry and its transformations as detected by visible spectroscopy. Students observe isosbestic points in visible spectra, determine the rate and rate law, measure the rate constant at several temperatures, and derive the activation energy for the aquation reaction. Satisfies 5 units of Institute Laboratory credit.
Fall: J. Dolhun, A. Radosevich
Spring: J. Dolhun, A. Radosevich
No textbook information available

5.353 Macromolecular Prodrugs
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Partial Lab; partial term
Prereq: None. Coreq: 5.12 and 5.352
Units: 1-2-1
Add to schedule Safety lecture mandatory. MW sections on 9/4 at 1 pm. TR sections on 9/5 at 1 pm. See course for the link. Meets 11/6 to 12/10. Lecture: TR12 (4-231) Lab: MW1-5 (12-5170B) or TR1-5 (12-5170B)
______
Students carry out an experiment that builds skills in how to rationally design macromolecules for drug delivery based on fundamental principles of physical organic chemistry. Begins with conjugation of a drug molecule to a polymerizable group through a cleavable linker to generate a prodrug monomer. Continues with polymerization of monomer to produce macromolecular (i.e., polymer) prodrug; monomer and polymer prodrugs are fully characterized. Rate of drug release is measured and correlated to the size of the macromolecule as well as the structure of the cleavable linker. Satisfies 4 units of Institute Laboratory credit.
Fall: J. Dolhun, J. Johnson
Spring: J. Dolhun, J. Johnson
No textbook information available

5.361 Recombinant DNA Technology
______

Undergrad (Spring); partial term
Prereq: (5.07 or 7.05) and (5.310 or 5.352)
Units: 1-2-1
______
Students explore the biochemical basis for the efficacy of a blockbuster drug: Gleevec, which is used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia. Its target, Abl kinase, is produced in E. coli by recombinant DNA technology, purified using affinity chromatography, and analyzed with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, UV-vis spectroscopy, and a colorimetric assay. Natural mutations found in Gleevec-resistant cancer patients are introduced into the ABL1 proto-oncogene with PCR-based mutagenesis and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis.
L. Kiessling, J. Dolhun

5.362 Cancer Drug Efficacy
______

Undergrad (Spring); partial term
Prereq: (5.07 or 7.05) and (5.310 or 5.352); Coreq: 5.361
Units: 1-2-2
______
Students probe the structural basis for the development of resistance to Gleevec by cancer patients. LC-MS is used to quantify the effect of Gleevec on catalysis by wild-type Abl kinase and a Gleevec-resistant variant (Module 4). Other potential drugs are tested as inhibitors of the Abl variant. Molecular graphics software is used to understand catalysis by Abl kinase, its inhibition by Gleevec, and the basis for drug resistance.
L. Kiessling, J. Dolhun

5.363 Organic Structure Determination
______

Undergrad (Fall) Partial Lab; partial term
Prereq: 5.12; Coreq: 5.13
Units: 1-2-1
Add to schedule Safety lecture mandatory. MW sections on 9/4 at 1 pm. TR sections on 9/5 at 1 pm. See course for the link. Meets 11/6 to 12/10. Lecture: TR12 (2-105) Lab: MW1-5 (12-5170B) or TR1-5 (12-5170B)
______
Introduces modern methods for the elucidation of the structure of organic compounds. Students carry out transition metal-catalyzed coupling reactions, based on chemistry developed in the Buchwald laboratory, using reactants of unknown structure. Students also perform full spectroscopic characterization - by proton and carbon NMR, IR, and mass spectrometry of the reactants - and carry out coupling products in order to identify the structures of each compound. Other techniques include transfer and manipulation of organic and organometallic reagents and compounds, separation by extraction, and purification by column chromatography. Satisfies 4 units of Institute Laboratory credit.
J. Dolhun
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

5.371 Continuous Flow Chemistry: Sustainable Conversion of Reclaimed Vegetable Oil into Biodiesel
______

Undergrad (Spring); partial term
Prereq: 5.13 and 5.363
Units: 1-2-1
______
Presents the theoretical and practical fundamentals of continuous flow synthesis, wherein pumps, tubes, and connectors are used to conduct chemical reactions instead of flasks, beakers, etc. Focuses on a catalytic reaction that converts natural vegetable oil into biodiesel that can be used in a variety of combustion engines. Provides instruction in several important organic chemistry experimental techniques, including purification by extraction, rotary evaporation, acid-base titration, gas chromatography (GC), and 1H NMR.
T. Jamison, J. Dolhun

5.372 Chemistry of Renewable Energy
______

Undergrad (Fall); partial term
Prereq: 5.03 and 5.352
Units: 1-2-1
Add to schedule Safety lecture mandatory. MW sections on 9/4 at 1 pm. TR sections on 9/5 at 1 pm. See course for the link. Meets 9/9 to 10/1. Lecture: TR12 (2-105) Lab: MW1-5 (12-5170B) or TR1-5 (12-5170B)
______
Introduces the electrochemical processes that underlie renewable energy storage and recovery. Students investigate charge transfer reactions at electrode surfaces that are critical to the operation of advanced batteries, fuel cells, and electrolyzers. Develops basic theory behind inner- and outer-sphere charge transfer reactions at interfaces and applies this theory to construct mechanistic models for important energy conversion reactions including the reduction of O2 to water and the reduction of protons to H2. Students will also synthesize new catalytic materials for these reactions and investigate their relative performance.
J. Dolhun, Y. Surendranath
No textbook information available

5.373 Synthesis of Boron Heterocycles
______

Undergrad (Fall); partial term
Prereq: 5.03 and 5.363
Units: 1-2-1
Add to schedule Safety lecture mandatory. MW sections on 9/4 at 1 pm. TR sections on 9/5 at 1 pm. See course for the link. Meets 10/7 to 10/31. Lecture: TR12 (2-105) Lab: MW1-5 (12-5170B) or TR1-5 (12-5170B)
______
Experimental module focused on the synthesis and characterization of boron heterocycles, which are used as chemical synthons for metal complexes, small-molecule activation (e.g., carbon dioxide), catalysis mediators, components of optoelectronic materials, monomers for polymeric systems, and molecular building blocks for photochemistry. Covers techniques such as glovebox and Schlenk line methods for synthesis in the absence of oxygen and water; ligand effects, filtration, reaction mixture concentration, and recrystallization under an inert atmosphere. Characterization methods include proton and boron NMR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and fluorescence measurements.
R. Gilliard
No textbook information available

5.381 Quantum Dots
______

Undergrad (Spring); partial term
Prereq: 5.353 and 5.61
Units: 1-2-1
______
Covers synthesis of a discrete size series of quantum dots, followed by synthesis of a single size of core/shell quantum dots utilizing air-free Schlenk manipulation of precursors. Uses characterization by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies to rationalize the compositional/size dependence of the shell on the electronic structure of the quantum dots. Students acquire time traces of the fluorescence of single core and core/shell quantum dots using single molecule spectroscopic tools. The fluorescence on/off blinking distribution observed will be fit to a standard model. Students use Matlab for computational modeling of the electron and hole wavefunction in core and core/shell quantum dots. Analyzes several commercial applications of quantum dot technologies.
M. Bawendi, J. Dolhun

5.382 Time- and Frequency-resolved Spectroscopy of Photosynthesis
______

Undergrad (Spring); partial term
Prereq: 5.611 and (5.07 or 7.05); Coreq: 5.361
Units: 1-2-2
______
Uses time- and frequency-resolved fluorescence measurements to investigate photosynthetic light harvesting and energy transfer.
G. Schlau-Cohen

5.383 Fast-flow Peptide and Protein Synthesis
______

Undergrad (Spring); partial term
Prereq: 5.363 and (5.07 or 7.05)
Units: 1-2-1
______
Develops understanding of both the theory and practice of fundamental techniques in biological chemistry, including chemical reactivity (amide-bond formation, solid phase synthesis, disulfide bond formation, and protecting group chemistry); separation science for purification and analysis, such as preparative HPLC and MALDI-TOF MS; and protein structure-function relationships (protein folding and binding). Periodically, guest lecturers from the local biotech research community will describe practical applications in industry.
B. Pentelute, J. Dolhun

5.39 Research and Communication in Chemistry
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: An approved research experience and permission of instructor
Units: 2-12-6
______
Independent research under the direction of a member of the Chemistry Department faculty. Allows students with a strong interest in independent research to fulfill  part of the laboratory requirement for the Chemistry Department Program in the context of a research laboratory at MIT. The research must be conducted on the MIT campus and be a continuation of a previous 12-unit UROP project or full-time work over the summer. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication is provided, culminating in a poster presentation of the work at the annual departmental UROP symposium and a research publication-style writeup of the results.  Permission of the faculty research advisor and the Chemistry Education Office must be obtained in advance.
A. Radosevich

5.43 Advanced Organic Chemistry
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 5.13
Units: 4-0-8
______
Reaction mechanisms in organic chemistry: methods of investigation, relation of structure to reactivity, and reactive intermediates. Photochemistry and organometallic chemistry, with an emphasis on fundamental reactivity, mechanistic studies, and applications in organic chemistry.
T. Swager

5.44 Organometallic Chemistry
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall); second half of term
Prereq: 5.061, 5.43, 5.47, or permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
______
Examination of the most important transformations of organotransition-metal species. Emphasizes basic mechanisms of their reactions, structure-reactivity relationships, and applications in synthesis.
A. Wendlandt

5.45 Heterocyclic Chemistry
______

Graduate (Spring); first half of term
Prereq: 5.511 and 5.53
Units: 2-0-4
______
Provides an introduction to the chemistry of heterocyclic compounds. Surveys synthesis and reactivity of the major classes of heterocyclic organic compounds. Discusses the importance of these molecules in the pharmaceutical and other industries.
S. Buchwald

5.46 NMR Spectroscopy and Organic Structure Determination
______

Graduate (Spring); first half of term
Prereq: 5.13
Units: 2-0-4
______
Applications of multinuclear NMR spectroscopy to the study of organic compounds.
W. Massefski

5.47 Tutorial in Organic Chemistry
______

Graduate (Fall); partial term
Prereq: 5.43 and permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4 [P/D/F]
Add to schedule Ends Sep 27. Lecture: MWF9-11 (18-278)
______
Systematic review of fundamental concepts concerned with the structure and transformations of organic molecules. Problem-solving workshop format. The program is intended primarily for first-year graduate students with a strong interest in organic chemistry. Meets during the month of September.
S. Buchwald, T. Swager, R. Danheiser, J. Johnson, M. Movassaghi, A. Wendlandt
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

5.48[J] Protein Folding in Health and Disease
______

Graduate (Spring); first half of term
(Same subject as 7.88[J])
Prereq: (5.07 or 7.05) and permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-3
______
Focuses on understanding the chemical and biological mechanisms of protein folding, misfolding, aggregation, and quality control. Topics covered include: molecular mechanisms of protein folding; experimental and computational strategies to study protein folding; how cells fold and quality control proteins; protein misfolding and aggregation; proteostasis and human disease; strategies to address protein folding failures in disease; and protein folding in biotechnology development. Provides state-of-the-art understanding of the field, fosters ability to critically assess and use the literature, and empowers students to study and address protein folding issues in their research and beyond.
M. Shoulders

5.49 Chemical Microbiology
______

Graduate (Spring); second half of term
Prereq: (5.07 or 7.05) and permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-3
______
Focuses on molecular understanding of fundamental processes central to microbial physiology and infectious disease. Topics covered vary and may include (i) secondary metabolite biosynthesis and function, (ii) small molecule mediators of microbe-microbe and microbe-host interactions, (iii) membrane assembly, (iv) metal homeostasis and regulation, (v) antibiotics and antibiotic resistance, (vi) chemistry of the microbiome, and (vii) molecular basis of host-pathogen interactions. Integrates experimental approaches and primary literature.
L. Nolan


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Produced: 22-JUL-2024 05:10 PM