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Course 1: Civil and Environmental Engineering
IAP/Spring 2024


Engineering Risk Assessment and Probabilistic Analysis

See also 1.203J.

Transportation

1.200[J] Transportation: Foundations and Methods
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 11.544[J], IDS.675[J])
(Subject meets with 1.041[J], IDS.075[J])
Prereq: 1.000, (1.00 and 1.010), or permission of instructor
Units: 3-1-8
Lecture: WF2.30-4 (1-135) Lab: M2 (1-150)
______
Covers core analytical and numerical methods for modeling, planning, operations, and control of transportation systems. Traffic flow theory, vehicle dynamics and behavior, numerical integration and simulation, graphical analysis. Properties of delays, queueing theory. Resource allocation, optimization models, linear and integer programming. Autonomy in transport, Markov Decision Processes, reinforcement learning, deep learning. Applications drawn broadly from land, air, and sea transport; private and public sector; transport of passengers and goods; futuristic, modern, and historical. Hands-on computational labs. Linear algebra background is encouraged but not required. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
C. Wu
No required or recommended textbooks

1.202 Demand Modeling
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-3-6
______
Theory and application of modeling and statistical methods for analysis and forecasting of demand for facilities, services, and products. Topics include: review of probability and statistics, estimation and testing of linear regression models, theory of individual choice behavior, derivation, estimation, and testing of discrete choice models, estimation under various sample designs and data collection methods (including revealed and stated preferences), sampling, aggregate and disaggregate forecasting methods, iterative proportional fitting, and related methods. Introductions to advanced topics are covered including Bayesian estimation and combining discrete choice analysis and machine learning. Lectures reinforced with case studies, which require specification, estimation, testing, and analysis of models using data sets from actual applications. Lab hours are for workbook case studies.
M. Ben-Akiva

1.203[J] Applied Probability and Stochastic Models
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 15.073[J], IDS.700[J])
Prereq: 6.3700 or 18.600
Units: 3-0-9
______
A vigorous use of probabilistic models to approximate real-life situations in Finance, Operations Management, Economics, and Operations Research. Emphasis on how to develop a suitable probabilistic model in a given setting and, merging probability with statistics, and on how to validate a proposed model against empirical evidence. Extensive treatment of Monte Carlo simulation for modeling random processes when analytic solutions are unattainable.
Staff

1.205 Advanced Demand Modeling
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 1.202 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Advanced theories and applications of models for analysis and forecasting of users' behavior and demand for facilities, services, and products. Topics vary each year and typically include linear and nonlinear latent variable models, including structural equations and latent class models; estimation techniques with multiple data sources; joint discrete and continuous choice models; dynamic models; analysis of panel data; analysis of complex choices; estimation and forecasting with large choice sets; multidimensional probabilistic choice models; advanced choice models, including probit, logit mixtures, treatment of endogeneity, hybrid choice models, hidden Markov models, Monte Carlo simulation, Bayesian methods, survey design, sampling, model transferability, use of stated preferences data, and discrete choice models with machine learning. Term paper required.
M. Ben-Akiva

1.208 Resilient Networks
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 6.3702 or 15.093
Units: 3-0-9
______
Network and combinatorial optimization methods and game-theoretic modeling for resilience of large-scale networks against disruptions, both random and adversarial. Topics include network resilience metrics, interdiction and security games, strategic resource allocation and network design, cascades in networks, routing games and network equilibrium models, reliability and security assessment of networked systems, and incentive problems in network security. Applications to transportation, logistics, supply chain, communication, and electric power systems.
S. Amin

1.231[J] Planning and Design of Airport Systems
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 16.781[J], IDS.670[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on current practice, developing trends, and advanced concepts in airport design and planning. Considers economic, environmental, and other trade-offs related to airport location, as well as the impacts of emphasizing "green" measures. Includes an analysis of the effect of airline operations on airports. Topics include demand prediction, determination of airfield capacity, and estimation of levels of congestion; terminal design; the role of airports in the aviation and transportation system; access problems; optimal configuration of air transport networks and implications for airport development; and economics, financing, and institutional aspects. Special attention to international practice and developments.
R. de Neufville, H. Balakrishnan, A.R, Odoni

1.232[J] The Airline Industry
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 15.054[J], 16.71[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Overview of the global airline industry, focusing on recent industry performance, current issues and challenges for the future. Fundamentals of airline industry structure, airline economics, operations planning, safety, labor relations, airports and air traffic control, marketing, and competitive strategies, with an emphasis on the interrelationships among major industry stakeholders. Recent research findings of the MIT Global Airline Industry Program are showcased, including the impacts of congestion and delays, evolution of information technologies, changing human resource management practices, and competitive effects of new entrant airlines. Taught by faculty participants of the Global Airline Industry Program.
F. Allroggen

1.233[J] Air Transportation Operations Research
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 16.763[J])
Prereq: 6.3702, 15.093, 16.71, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Subject Cancelled Subject Cancelled
______
Presents a unified view of advanced quantitative analysis and optimization techniques applied to the air transportation sector. Considers the problem of operating and managing the aviation sector from the perspectives of the system operators (e.g., the FAA), the airlines, and the resultant impacts on the end-users (the passengers). Explores models and optimization approaches to system-level problems, airline schedule planning problems, and airline management challenges. Term paper required.
Staff

1.251[J] Comparative Land Use and Transportation Planning
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring)
(Same subject as 11.526[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: M9-12 (9-255)
______
Focuses on the integration of land use and transportation planning, drawing from cases in both industrialized and developing countries. Highlights how land use and transportation influence the social organization of cities, assigning privileges to certain groups and segregating or negating access to the city to other groups. Covers topics such as accessibility; the use of data, algorithms, and bias; travel demand and travel behavior; governance; transit-oriented development; autonomous vehicles; transportation and real estate; and social, environmental, and health implications of land use and transportation. Develops students' skills to assess relevant policies, interventions, and impacts.
Fall: F. Duarte
Spring: F. Duarte
No required or recommended textbooks

1.253[J] Transportation Policy, the Environment, and Livable Communities
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 11.543[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines the economic and political conflict between transportation and the environment. Investigates the role of government regulation, green business and transportation policy as a facilitator of economic development and environmental sustainability. Analyzes a variety of international policy problems, including government-business relations, the role of interest groups, non-governmental organizations, and the public and media in the regulation of the automobile; sustainable development; global warming; politics of risk and siting of transport facilities; environmental justice; equity; as well as transportation and public health in the urban metropolis. Provides students with an opportunity to apply transportation and planning methods to develop policy alternatives in the context of environmental politics. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
Staff

1.260[J] Logistics Systems
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 15.770[J], IDS.730[J], SCM.260[J])
(Subject meets with SCM.271)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides an introduction to supply chain management from both analytical and practical perspectives. Taking a unified approach, students develop a framework for making intelligent decisions within the supply chain. Covers key logistics functions, such as demand planning, procurement, inventory theory and control, transportation planning and execution, reverse logistics, and flexible contracting. Explores concepts such as postponement, portfolio management, and dual sourcing. Emphasizes skills necessary to recognize and manage risk, analyze various tradeoffs, and model logistics systems. SCM.271 meets with SCM.260, but has fewer assignments.
C. Caplice, D. Correll

1.261[J] Case Studies in Logistics and Supply Chain Management
______

Graduate (Spring); second half of term
(Same subject as 15.771[J], SCM.261[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4
Begins Apr 1. Lecture: TR1-2.30 (E52-164)
______
A combination of lectures and cases covering the strategic, management, and operating issues in contemporary logistics and integrated supply chain management. Includes: logistics strategy; supply chain restructuring and change management; and distribution, customer service, and inventory policy.
J. Byrnes
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

1.263[J] Urban Last-Mile Logistics
______

Graduate (Spring); second half of term
(Same subject as 11.263[J], SCM.293[J])
Prereq: SCM.254 or permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
Begins Apr 1. Lecture: TR8.30-10 (E51-361) Recitation: F8.30 (E51-361)
______
Explores specific challenges of urban last-mile B2C and B2B distribution in both industrialized and emerging economies. Develops an in-depth understanding of the perspectives, roles, and decisions of all relevant stakeholder groups, from consumers to private sector decision makers and public policy makers. Discusses the most relevant traditional and the most promising innovating operating models for urban last-mile distribution. Introduces applications of the essential quantitative methods for the strategic design and tactical planning of urban last-mile distribution systems, including optimization and simulation. Covers basic facility location problems, network design problems, single- and multi-echelon vehicle routing problems, as well as associated approximation techniques. Requires intermediate coding skills in Python and independent quantitative analyses Python.
M. Winkenbach
No required or recommended textbooks

1.265[J] Global Supply Chain Management
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 2.965[J], 15.765[J], SCM.265[J])
Prereq: 15.761, 15.778, SCM.260, SCM.261, or permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
______
Focuses on the planning, processes, and activities of supply chain management for companies involved in international commerce. Students examine the end-to-end processes and operational challenges in managing global supply chains, such as the basics of global trade, international transportation, duty, taxes, trade finance and hedging, currency issues, outsourcing, cultural differences, risks and security, and green supply chains issues. Highly interactive format features student-led discussions, staged debates, and a mock trial. Includes assignments on case studies and sourcing analysis, as well as projects and a final exam.
Staff

1.266 Supply Chain and Demand Analytics
______

Graduate (Spring); first half of term
Prereq: 15.761 or SCM.260
Units: 2-0-4
Ends Mar 22. Lecture: R9-12 (E51-057)
______
Focuses on effective supply chain and demand analytics for companies that operate globally, with emphasis on how to plan and integrate supply chain components into a coordinated system. Exposes students to concepts, models and machine learning, and optimization-based algorithms important in supply chain planning, with emphasis on supply chain segmentation, inventory optimization, supply and demand coordination, supply chain resiliency, and flexibility.
D. Simchi-Levi
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

1.267 Statistical Learning in Operations
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: F1-3.30 (E51-057)
______
Focuses on applications of machine learning methods, combined with OR techniques, to study a variety of operational problems — from supply chain through revenue management all the way to healthcare management. The class will bring together two different disciplines, Operations Research and Computer Science, to develop both theory and effective techniques for dealing with operational problems.
D. Simchi-Levi
No required or recommended textbooks

1.27 Studies in Transportation
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
TBA.
______
Individual advanced study of a topic in transportation systems, selected with the approval of the instructor.
Fall: Staff
Spring: N. Wilson
Summer: N. Wilson
No required or recommended textbooks

1.271[J] The Theory of Operations Management
______

Graduate (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
(Same subject as 15.764[J], IDS.250[J])
Prereq: (6.7210 and 6.7700) or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR2.30-4 (E51-151)
______
Provides mathematical foundations underlying the theory of operations management. Covers both classic and state-of-the-art results in various application domains, including inventory management, supply chain management and logistics, behavioral operations, healthcare management, service industries, pricing and revenue management, and auctions. Studies a wide range of mathematical and analytical techniques, such as dynamic programming, stochastic orders, principal-agent models and contract design, behavioral and experimental economics, algorithms and approximations, data-driven and learning models, and mechanism design. Also provides practical experience in how to apply the theoretical models to solve OM problems in business settings. Specific topics vary from year to year.
D. Freund
No required or recommended textbooks

1.273[J] Supply Chain Analytics
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 15.762[J], IDS.735[J])
Prereq: 15.761 or SCM.260
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: MW8.30-10 (E51-345)
______
Focuses on effective supply chain strategies for companies that operate globally, with emphasis on how to plan and integrate supply chain components into a coordinated system. Students are exposed to concepts and models important in supply chain planning with emphasis on key tradeoffs and phenomena. Introduces and utilizes key tactics such as risk pooling and inventory placement, integrated planning and collaboration, and information sharing. Lectures, computer exercises, and case discussions introduce various models and methods for supply chain analysis and optimization.
N. Trichakis
No required or recommended textbooks

1.274[J] Supply Chain: Capacity Analytics
______

Graduate (Spring); second half of term
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 15.763[J], IDS.736[J])
Prereq: 15.761, 15.778, or SCM.260
Units: 2-0-4
______
Focuses on decision making for system design, as it arises in manufacturing systems and supply chains. Students exposed to frameworks and models for structuring the key issues and trade-offs. Presents and discusses new opportunities, issues and concepts introduced by the internet and e-commerce. Introduces various models, methods and software tools for logistics network design, capacity planning and flexibility, make-buy, and integration with product development. Industry applications and cases illustrate concepts and challenges. Recommended for Operations Management concentrators. Second half-term subject.
Staff

1.275[J] Business and Operations Analytics
______

Graduate (Spring); first half of term
(Same subject as IDS.305[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
Ends Mar 22. Lecture: T10-1 (1-390)
______
Provides instruction on identifying, evaluating, and capturing business analytics opportunities that create value. Also provides basic instruction in analytics methods and case study analysis of organizations that successfully deployed these techniques.
D. Simchi-Levi
No required or recommended textbooks

1.286[J] Urban Energy Systems and Policy
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 11.477[J])
(Subject meets with 11.165)
Prereq: 11.203, 14.01, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions. Examines key issues in the current and future development of urban energy systems, such as technology, use, behavior, regulation, climate change, and lack of access or energy poverty. Case studies on a diverse sampling of cities explore how prospective technologies and policies can be implemented. Includes intensive group research projects, discussion, and debate.
D. Hsu

Geoenvironmental and Geotechnical Engineering

1.303[J] Infrastructure Design for Climate Change
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 11.273[J])
(Subject meets with 1.103[J], 11.173[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 0-2-4
______
In this team-oriented, project-based subject, students work to find technical solutions that could be implemented to mitigate the effects of natural hazards related to climate change, bearing in mind that any proposed measures must be appropriate in a given region's socio-political-economic context. Students are introduced to a variety of natural hazards and possible mitigation approaches as well as principles of design, including adaptable design and design for failure. Students select the problems they want to solve and develop their projects. During the term, officials and practicing engineers of Cambridge, Boston, Puerto Rico, and MIT Facilities describe their approaches. Student projects are documented in a written report and oral presentation. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
H. Einstein

1.322 Soil Behavior
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 1.361
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: MW2,F10 (1-371) Recitation: TBA
______
Detailed study of soil properties with emphasis on interpretation of field and laboratory test data and their use in soft-ground construction engineering. Includes: consolidation and secondary compression; basic strength principles; stress-strain strength behavior of clays, emphasizing effects of sample disturbance, anisotropy, and strain rate; strength and compression of granular soils; and engineering properties of compacted soils. Some knowledge of field and laboratory testing assumed; 1.37 desirable.
A. Whittle
No required or recommended textbooks

1.351 Theoretical Soil Mechanics
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 1.361
Units: 3-0-9
______
Presentation of fundamental theories in soil mechanics: field equations of linear elasticity and solutions of boundary value problems. Introduction to finite element method. Steady and transient flow in porous media; applications in confined and unconfined seepage, and one-dimensional consolidation. Introduction to poro-elasticity. Yielding and failure of soils; plasticity theory and limit analyses, with examples for bearing capacity and slope stability. Cam Clay models and critical state theory of soil behavior.
A.Whittle

1.361 Advanced Soil Mechanics
______

Graduate (Fall); first half of term
(Subject meets with 1.032)
Prereq: 1.036
Units: 3-0-6
______
Covers topics in the characterization and nature of soils as multi-phase materials; the principle of effective stress; hydraulic conductivity and groundwater seepage; shear strength and stability analyses; stress-deformation properties, consolidatoin theory and calculation of settlements for clays and sands.
A. Whittle

1.364 Advanced Geotechnical Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall); second half of term
Prereq: 1.361
Units: 3-0-6
______
Methodology for site characterization and geotechnical aspects of the design and construction of foundation systems. Topics include site investigation (with emphasis on in situ testing), shallow (footings and raftings) and deep (piles and caissons) foundations, excavation support systems, groundwater control, slope stability, soil improvement (compaction, soil reinforcement, etc.), and construction monitoring.
A. Whittle

1.38 Engineering Geology
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-1-8
______
Studies the effect of geologic features and processes on constructed facilities; interaction between the geologic environment and man-made structures, and human activities in general. Planning of subsurface exploration. Engineering geologic characterization of soil and rock, including joint surveys and aspects of sedimented and residual soils. Laboratory on basic geologic identification and mapping techniques. Extensive reading of case histories. Field trip.
H. Einstein

1.381 Rock Mechanics
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 1.361 and 1.38
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces theoretical and experimental aspects of rock mechanics and prepares students for rock engineering. Includes review of laboratory and field testing; empirical and analytical methods for describing strength, deformability and conductivity of intact rock and rock masses; fracture mechanics and mechanics of discontinua, including flow through discontinua and hydraulic fracturing; and design and analysis of rock slopes and foundations on rock. Also discusses blasting design. Includes term paper/term project.
H. Einstein

1.383 Underground Construction
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 1.361, 1.38, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: TR9-10.30 (1-371)
______
Provides familiarization with the most important aspects of planning, analysis, design, and construction of underground structures in soil and rock. Covers detailed engineering analysis and design, and major aspects of construction techniques and construction planning. Discusses general planning and economic problems. Includes a major design project involving all aspects of underground construction.
H. Einstein
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

1.39 Independent Study in Geotechnical Engineering
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
TBA.
______
For graduate students desiring further individual study of topics in geotechnical engineering.
Fall: Staff
Spring: A. Whittle
Summer: A. Whittle
No required or recommended textbooks

Construction Engineering and Management

1.462[J] Entrepreneurship in the Built Environment
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall); first half of term
(Same subject as 11.345[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-4
______
Introduction to entrepreneurship and how it shapes the world we live in. Through experiential learning in a workshop setting, students start to develop entrepreneurial mindset and skills. Through a series of workshops, students are introduced to the concept of Venture Design to create new venture proposals for the built environment as a method to understand the role of the entrepreneur in the fields of design, planning, real estate, and other related industries.
G. Rosenzweig

1.472[J] Innovative Project Delivery in the Public and Private Sectors
______

Graduate (Spring); first half of term
(Same subject as 11.344[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-4
Ends Mar 22. Lecture: TR4-5.30 (9-354)
______
Develops a strong strategic understanding of how best to deliver various types of projects in the built environment. Examines the compatibility of various project delivery methods, consisting of organizations, contracts, and award methods, with certain types of projects and owners. Six methods examined: traditional general contracting; construction management; multiple primes; design-build; turnkey; and build-operate-transfer. Includes lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and a team project to analyze a case example.
C. M. Gordon
No required or recommended textbooks


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