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Course 6: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
IAP/Spring 2024


Circuits & Applications

6.2000 Electrical Circuits: Modeling and Design of Physical Systems
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Rest Elec in Sci & Tech
Prereq: Physics II (GIR)
Units: 3-2-7
Lecture: TR11 (3-270) Lab: F10-1 (38-530) or F2-5 (38-530) Recitation: W11 (26-210) or W12 (26-210) or W1 (26-210) +final
______
Fundamentals of linear systems, and abstraction modeling of multi-physics lumped and distributed systems using lumped electrical circuits. Linear networks involving independent and dependent sources, resistors, capacitors, and inductors. Extensions to include operational amplifiers and transducers. Dynamics of first- and second-order networks; analysis and design in the time and frequency domains; signal and energy processing applications. Design exercises. Weekly laboratory with microcontroller and transducers.
Fall: A. Hartz
Spring: J. Lang
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

6.2020[J] Electronics Project Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring)
(Same subject as EC.120[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 1-2-3
Lecture: M EVE (7 PM) (4-409) Lab: M EVE (8-10 PM) (4-409)
______
Intuition-based introduction to electronics, electronic components, and test equipment such as oscilloscopes, multimeters, and signal generators. Key components studied and used are op-amps, comparators, bi-polar transistors, and diodes (including LEDs). Students design, build, and debug small electronics projects (often featuring sound and light) to put their new knowledge into practice. Upon completing the class, students can take home a kit of components. Intended for students with little or no previous background in electronics. Enrollment may be limited.
Fall: J. Bales
Spring: J. Bales
No required or recommended textbooks

6.2030 Electronics First Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: None. Coreq: Physics II (GIR)
Units: 4-4-4
Lecture: TR3-5 (36-112) Lab: TBA
______
Practical introduction to the design and construction of electronic circuits for information processing and control. Laboratory exercises include activities such as the construction of oscillators for a simple musical instrument, a laser audio communicator, a countdown timer, an audio amplifier, and a feedback-controlled solid-state lighting system for daylight energy conservation. Introduces basic electrical components including resistors, capacitors, and inductors; basic assembly techniques for electronics include breadboarding and soldering; and programmable system-on-chip electronics and C programming language. Enrollment limited.
S. B. Leeb
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

6.2040 Analog Electronics Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Spring) Institute Lab
Prereq: 6.2000
Units: 2-9-1
Lecture: TR9.30-11 (24-115)
______
Experimental laboratory explores the design, construction, and debugging of analog electronic circuits. Lectures and laboratory projects in the first half of the course investigate the performance characteristics of semiconductor devices (diodes, BJTs, and MOSFETs) and functional analog building blocks, including single-stage amplifiers, op amps, small audio amplifier, filters, converters, sensor circuits, and medical electronics (ECG, pulse-oximetry). Projects involve design, implementation, and presentation in an environment similar to that of industry engineering design teams. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication provided. Opportunity to simulate real-world problems and solutions that involve tradeoffs and the use of engineering judgment.
M. Coln
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

6.2050 Digital Systems Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Fall) Institute Lab
Prereq: 6.1910 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-7-2
______
Lab-intensive subject that investigates digital systems with a focus on FPGAs. Lectures and labs cover logic, flip flops, counters, timing, synchronization, finite-state machines, digital signal processing, communication protocols, and modern sensors. Prepares students for the design and implementation of a large-scale final project of their choice: games, music, digital filters, wireless communications, video, or graphics. Extensive use of System/Verilog for describing and implementing and verifying digital logic designs.
J. Steinmeyer

6.2060 Microcomputer Project Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Spring) Institute Lab
(Subject meets with 6.2061)
Prereq: 6.1910, 6.2000, or 6.3000
Units: 3-6-3
Lecture: TR1 (35-225) Recitation: W3 (35-225)
______
Introduces analysis and design of embedded systems. Microcontrollers provide adaptation, flexibility, and real-time control. Emphasizes construction of complete systems, including a five-axis robot arm, a fluorescent lamp ballast, a tomographic imaging station (e.g., a CAT scan), and a simple calculator. Presents a wide range of basic tools, including software and development tools, programmable system on chip, peripheral components such as A/D converters, communication schemes, signal processing techniques, closed-loop digital feedback control, interface and power electronics, and modeling of electromechanical systems. Includes a sequence of assigned projects, followed by a final project of the student's choice, emphasizing creativity and uniqueness. Provides instruction in written and oral communication. To satisfy the independent inquiry component of this subject, students expand the scope of their laboratory project.
S. B. Leeb
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

6.2061 Microcomputer Project Laboratory - Independent Inquiry
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with 6.2060)
Prereq: 6.1910, 6.2000, or 6.3000
Units: 3-9-3
Lecture: TR1 (35-225) Recitation: W3 (35-225)
______
Introduces analysis and design of embedded systems. Microcontrollers provide adaptation, flexibility, and real-time control. Emphasizes construction of complete systems, including a five-axis robot arm, a fluorescent lamp ballast, a tomographic imaging station (e.g., a CAT scan), and a simple calculator. Presents a wide range of basic tools, including software and development tools, programmable system on chip, peripheral components such as A/D converters, communication schemes, signal processing techniques, closed-loop digital feedback control, interface and power electronics, and modeling of electromechanical systems. Includes a sequence of assigned projects, followed by a final project of the student's choice, emphasizing creativity and uniqueness. Provides instruction in written and oral communication. Students taking independent inquiry version 6.2061 expand the scope of their laboratory project.
S. B. Leeb
No textbook information available

6.2080 Semiconductor Electronic Circuits
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 6.2000
Units: 3-2-7
Lecture: MW11 (4-237) Recitation: TR1 (34-303) or TR2 (34-303)
______
Provides an introduction to basic circuit design, starting from basic semiconductor devices such as diodes and transistors, large and small signal models and analysis, to circuits such as basic amplifier and opamp circuits. Labs give students access to CAD/EDA tools to design, analyze, and layout analog circuits. At the end of the term, students have their chip design fabricated using a 22nm FinFET CMOS process.
R. Han
No textbook information available

6.2090 Solid-State Circuits
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 6.2092)
Prereq: 6.2040, 6.2080, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-2-7
______
Fosters deep understanding and intuition that is crucial in innovating analog circuits and optimizing the whole system in bipolar junction transistor (BJT) and metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) technologies. Covers both theory and real-world applications of basic amplifier structures, operational amplifiers, temperature sensors, bandgap references. Covers topics such as noise, linearity and stability. Homework and labs give students access to CAD/EDA tools to design and analyze analog circuits. Provides practical experience through lab exercises, including a broadband amplifier design and characterization. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
N. Reiskarimian

6.2092 Solid-State Circuits
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 6.2090)
Prereq: 6.2040, 6.2080, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-2-7
______
Fosters deep understanding and intuition that is crucial in innovating analog circuits and optimizing the whole system in bipolar junction transistor (BJT) and metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) technologies. Covers both theory and real-world applications of basic amplifier structures, operational amplifiers, temperature sensors, bandgap references. Covers topics such as noise, linearity and stability. Homework and labs give students access to CAD/EDA tools to design and analyze analog circuits. Provides practical experience through lab exercises, including a broadband amplifier design and characterization. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
N. Reiskarimian

6.6000 CMOS Analog and Mixed-Signal Circuit Design
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 6.2090
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: MW11-12.30 (32-144)
______
A detailed exposition of the principles involved in designing and optimizing analog and mixed-signal circuits in CMOS technologies. Small-signal and large-signal models. Systemic methodology for device sizing and biasing. Basic circuit building blocks. Operational amplifier design. Large signal considerations. Principles of switched capacitor networks including switched-capacitor and continuous-time integrated filters. Basic and advanced A/D and D/A converters, delta-sigma modulators, RF and other signal processing circuits. Design projects on op amps and subsystems are a required part of the subject.
H. Lee
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

6.6010 Analysis and Design of Digital Integrated Circuits
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 6.1910 and (6.2080 or 6.2500)
Units: 3-3-6
______
Device and circuit level optimization of digital building blocks. Circuit design styles for logic, arithmetic, and sequential blocks. Estimation and minimization of energy consumption. Interconnect models and parasitics, device sizing and logical effort, timing issues (clock skew and jitter), and active clock distribution techniques. Memory architectures, circuits (sense amplifiers), and devices. Evaluation of how design choices affect tradeoffs across key metrics including energy consumption, speed, robustness, and cost. Extensive use of modern design flow and EDA/CAD tools for the analysis and design of digital building blocks and digital VLSI design for labs and design projects
V. Sze

6.6020 High Speed Communication Circuits
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 6.2090
Units: 3-3-6
______
Principles and techniques of high-speed integrated circuits used in wireless/wireline data links and remote sensing. On-chip passive component design of inductors, capacitors, and antennas. Analysis of distributed effects, such as transmission line modeling, S-parameters, and Smith chart. Transceiver architectures and circuit blocks, which include low-noise amplifiers, mixers, voltage-controlled oscillators, power amplifiers, and frequency dividers. Involves IC/EM simulation and laboratory projects.
R. Han

Energy

6.2200 Electric Energy Systems
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: 6.2000
Units: 4-0-8
______
Analysis and design of modern energy conversion and delivery systems. Develops a solid foundation in electromagnetic phenomena with a focus on electrical energy distribution, electro-mechanical energy conversion (motors and generators), and electrical-to-electrical energy conversion (DC-DC, DC-AC power conversion). Students apply the material covered to consider critical challenges associated with global energy systems, with particular examples related to the electrification of transport and decarbonization of the grid.
Staff

6.2210 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces and Motion
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 6.6210)
Prereq: Physics II (GIR) and 18.03
Units: 4-0-8
______
Study of electromagnetics and electromagnetic energy conversion leading to an understanding of devices, including electromagnetic sensors, actuators, motors and generators. Quasistatic Maxwell's equations and the Lorentz force law. Studies of the quasistatic fields and their sources through solutions of Poisson's and Laplace's equations. Boundary conditions and multi-region boundary-value problems. Steady-state conduction, polarization, and magnetization. Charge conservation and relaxation, and magnetic induction and diffusion. Extension to moving materials. Electric and magnetic forces and force densities derived from energy, and stress tensors. Extensive use of engineering examples. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
J. Lang

6.2220 Power Electronics Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Fall) Institute Lab
(Subject meets with 6.2221, 6.2222)
Prereq: 6.2000 or 6.3100
Units: 3-6-3
______
Introduces the design and construction of power electronic circuits and motor drives. Laboratory exercises include the construction of drive circuitry for an electric go-cart, flash strobes, computer power supplies, three-phase inverters for AC motors, and resonant drives for lamp ballasts and induction heating. Basic electric machines introduced include DC, induction, and permanent magnet motors, with drive considerations. Provides instruction in written and oral communication. Students taking independent inquiry version 6.2221 expand the scope of their laboratory project.
S. B. Leeb

6.2221 Power Electronics Laboratory - Independent Inquiry
______

Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 6.2220, 6.2222)
Prereq: 6.2000 or 6.3000
Units: 3-9-3
______
Introduces the design and construction of power electronic circuits and motor drives. Laboratory exercises include the construction of drive circuitry for an electric go-cart, flash strobes, computer power supplies, three-phase inverters for AC motors, and resonant drives for lamp ballasts and induction heating. Basic electric machines introduced include DC, induction, and permanent magnet motors, with drive considerations. Provides instruction in written and oral communication. To satisfy the independent inquiry component of this subject, students expand the scope of their laboratory project.
S. B. Leeb

6.2222 Power Electronics Laboratory
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 6.2220, 6.2221)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-9-3
______
 Hands-on introduction to the design and construction of power electronic circuits and motor drives. Laboratory exercises (shared with 6.131 and 6.1311) include the construction of drive circuitry for an electric go-cart, flash strobes, computer power supplies, three-phase inverters for AC motors, and resonant drives for lamp ballasts and induction heating. Basic electric machines introduced including DC, induction, and permanent magnet motors, with drive considerations. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments and an extended final project.
S. B. Leeb

6.6210 Electromagnetic Fields, Forces and Motion
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 6.2210)
Prereq: Physics II (GIR) and 18.03
Units: 4-0-8
______
Study of electromagnetics and electromagnetic energy conversion leading to an understanding of devices, including electromagnetic sensors, actuators, motors and generators. Quasistatic Maxwell's equations and the Lorentz force law. Studies of the quasistatic fields and their sources through solutions of Poisson's and Laplace's equations. Boundary conditions and multi-region boundary-value problems. Steady-state conduction, polarization, and magnetization. Charge conservation and relaxation, and magnetic induction and diffusion. Extension to moving materials. Electric and magnetic forces and force densities derived from energy, and stress tensors. Extensive use of engineering examples. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
J. H. Lang

6.6220 Power Electronics
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 6.2500
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: MWR1 (32-155)
______
The application of electronics to energy conversion and control. Modeling, analysis, and control techniques. Design of power circuits including inverters, rectifiers, and dc-dc converters. Analysis and design of magnetic components and filters. Characteristics of power semiconductor devices. Numerous application examples, such as motion control systems, power supplies, and radio-frequency power amplifiers.
D. Perreault
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

6.6280 Electric Machines
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 6.2200, 6.690, or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Treatment of electromechanical transducers, rotating and linear electric machines. Lumped-parameter electromechanics. Power flow using Poynting's theorem, force estimation using the Maxwell stress tensor and Principle of virtual work. Development of analytical techniques for predicting device characteristics: energy conversion density, efficiency; and of system interaction characteristics: regulation, stability, controllability, and response. Use of electric machines in drive systems. Problems taken from current research.
J. L. Kirtley, Jr.

Electromagnetics, Photonics, and Quantum

6.2300 Electromagnetics Waves and Applications
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: Calculus II (GIR) and Physics II (GIR)
Units: 3-5-4
Lecture: MW1 (32-144) Lab: T10 (38-600) or T11 (38-600) Recitation: R10 (4-153) or R11 (4-153)
______
Analysis and design of modern applications that employ electromagnetic phenomena for signals and power transmission in RF, microwaves, optical and wireless communication systems. Fundamentals include dynamic solutions for Maxwell's equations; electromagnetic power and energy, waves in media, metallic and dielectric waveguides, radiation, and diffraction; resonance; filters; and acoustic analogs. Lab activities range from building to testing of devices and systems (e.g., antenna arrays, radars, dielectric waveguides). Students work in teams on self-proposed maker-style design projects with a focus on fostering creativity, teamwork, and debugging skills. 6.2000 and 6.3000 are recommended but not required.
L. Daniel, K. O'Brien
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

6.2370 Modern Optics Project Laboratory
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall) Institute Lab
(Subject meets with 6.6370)
Prereq: 6.3000
Units: 3-5-4
______
Lectures, laboratory exercises and projects on optical signal generation, transmission, detection, storage, processing and display. Topics include polarization properties of light; reflection and refraction; coherence and interference; Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction; holography; Fourier optics; coherent and incoherent imaging and signal processing systems; optical properties of materials; lasers and LEDs; electro-optic and acousto-optic light modulators; photorefractive and liquid-crystal light modulation; display technologies; optical waveguides and fiber-optic communication systems; photodetectors. Students may use this subject to find an advanced undergraduate project. Students engage in extensive oral and written communication exercises. Recommended prerequisite: 8.03.
C. Warde

6.2400 Introduction to Quantum Systems Engineering
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: 6.2300 and (18.06 or 18.C06)
Units: 4-2-6
______
Introduction to the quantum mechanics needed to engineer quantum systems for computation, communication, and sensing. Topics include: motivation for quantum engineering, qubits and quantum gates, rules of quantum mechanics, mathematical background, quantum electrical circuits and other physical quantum systems, harmonic and anharmonic oscillators, measurement, the Schrödinger equation, noise, entanglement, benchmarking, quantum communication, and quantum algorithms. No prior experience with quantum mechanics is assumed.
K. Berggren, A. Natarajan, K. O'Brien

6.2410 Quantum Engineering Platforms
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 6.2400, 6.6400, 18.435, or (8.04 and 8.05)
Units: 1-5-6
Lab: MW10-12 (38-633) or TR1-3 (38-633)
______
Provides practical knowledge and quantum engineering experience with several physical platforms for quantum computation, communication, and sensing, including photonics, superconducting qubits, and trapped ions. Labs include both a hardware component — to gain experience with challenges, design, and non-idealities — and a cloud component to run algorithms on state of the art commercial systems. Use entangled photons to communicate securely (quantum key distribution). Run quantum algorithms on trapped ion and superconducting quantum computers. 
D. Englund
No textbook information available

6.6300 Electromagnetics
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Physics II (GIR) and 6.3000
Units: 4-0-8
______
Explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless and optical communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals include quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided and unguided waves; modal expansions; resonance; acoustic analogs; and forces, power, and energy.
J. Notaros

6.6310 Optics and Photonics
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 6.2300 or 8.03
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduction to fundamental concepts and techniques of optics, photonics, and fiber optics, aimed at developing skills for independent research. Topics include: Review of Maxwell's equations, light propagation, reflection and transmission, dielectric mirrors and filters. Scattering matrices, interferometers, and interferometric measurement. Fresnel and Fraunhoffer diffraction theory. Lenses, optical imaging systems, and software design tools. Gaussian beams, propagation and resonator design. Optical waveguides, optical fibers and photonic devices for encoding and detection. Discussion of research operations / funding and professional development topics. The course reviews and introduces mathematical methods and techniques, which are fundamental in optics and photonics, but also useful in many other engineering specialties.
Staff

6.6330 Fundamentals of Photonics
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 6.6331)
Prereq: 2.71, 6.2300, or 8.07
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers the fundamentals of optics and the interaction of light and matter, leading to devices such as light emitting diodes, optical amplifiers, and lasers. Topics include classical ray, wave, beam, and Fourier optics; Maxwell's electromagnetic waves; resonators; quantum theory of photons; light-matter interaction; laser amplification; lasers; and semiconductors optoelectronics. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
D. R. Englund

6.6331 Fundamentals of Photonics
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Undergrad (Fall)
(Subject meets with 6.6330)
Prereq: 2.71, 6.2300, or 8.07
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers the fundamentals of optics and the interaction of light and matter, leading to devices such as light emitting diodes, optical amplifiers, and lasers. Topics include classical ray, wave, beam, and Fourier optics; Maxwell's electromagnetic waves; resonators; quantum theory of photons; light-matter interaction; laser amplification; lasers; and semiconductors optoelectronics. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
D. R. Englund

6.6340[J] Nonlinear Optics
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 8.431[J])
Prereq: 6.2300 or 8.03
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: MW3-4.30 (36-372) +final
______
Techniques of nonlinear optics with emphasis on fundamentals for research in optics, photonics, spectroscopy, and ultrafast science. Topics include: electro-optic modulators and devices, sum and difference frequency generation, and parametric conversion. Nonlinear propagation effects in optical fibers including self-phase modulation, pulse compression, solitons, communication, and femtosecond fiber lasers. Review of quantum mechanics, interaction of light with matter, laser gain and operation, density matrix techniques, perturbation theory, diagrammatic methods, nonlinear spectroscopies, ultrafast lasers and measurements. Discussion of research operations and funding and professional development topics. Introduces fundamental methods and techniques needed for independent research in advanced optics and photonics, but useful in many other engineering and physics disciplines.
J. Fujimoto
No textbook information available

6.6370 Optical Imaging Devices, and Systems
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Fall)
(Subject meets with 6.2370)
Prereq: 6.3000
Units: 3-0-9
______
Principles of operation and applications of optical imaging devices and systems (includes optical signal generation, transmission, detection, storage, processing and display). Topics include review of the basic properties of electromagnetic waves; coherence and interference; diffraction and holography; Fourier optics; coherent and incoherent imaging and signal processing systems; optical properties of materials; lasers and LEDs; electro-optic and acousto-optic light modulators; photorefractive and liquid-crystal light modulation; spatial light modulators and displays; near-eye and projection displays, holographic and other 3-D display schemes, photodetectors; 2-D and 3-D optical storage technologies; adaptive optical systems; role of optics in next-generation computers. Requires a research paper on a specific contemporary optical imaging topic. Recommended prerequisite: 8.03.
C. Warde

6.6400 Applied Quantum and Statistical Physics
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 18.06
Units: 4-0-8
______
Elementary quantum mechanics and statistical physics. Introduces applied quantum physics. Emphasizes experimental basis for quantum mechanics. Applies Schrodinger's equation to the free particle, tunneling, the harmonic oscillator, and hydrogen atom. Variational methods. Elementary statistical physics; Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein, and Boltzmann distribution functions. Simple models for metals, semiconductors, and devices such as electron microscopes, scanning tunneling microscope, thermonic emitters, atomic force microscope, and more. Some familiarity with continuous time Fourier transforms recommended.
P. Hagelstein

6.6410[J] Quantum Computation
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.111[J], 8.370[J], 18.435[J])
Prereq: 8.05, 18.06, 18.700, 18.701, or 18.C06
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides an introduction to the theory and practice of quantum computation. Topics covered: physics of information processing; quantum algorithms including the factoring algorithm and Grover's search algorithm; quantum error correction; quantum communication and cryptography. Knowledge of quantum mechanics helpful but not required.
A. Harrow

6.6420[J] Quantum Information Science
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 8.371[J], 18.436[J])
Prereq: 18.435
Units: 3-0-9
Lecture: MW9.30-11 (37-212)
______
Examines quantum computation and quantum information. Topics include quantum circuits, the quantum Fourier transform and search algorithms, the quantum operations formalism, quantum error correction, Calderbank-Shor-Steane and stabilizer codes, fault tolerant quantum computation, quantum data compression, quantum entanglement, capacity of quantum channels, and quantum cryptography and the proof of its security. Prior knowledge of quantum mechanics required.
A. Harrow
Textbooks (Spring 2024)

Nanoelectronics & Nanotechnology

6.2500 Nanoelectronics and Computing Systems
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Prereq: 6.2000
Units: 4-0-8
Lecture: TR11 (32-124) Recitation: WF1 (36-155) or WF2 (36-155) +final
______
Studies interaction between materials, semiconductor physics, electronic devices, and computing systems. Develops intuition of how transistors operate. Topics range from introductory semiconductor physics to modern state-of-the-art nano-scale devices. Considers how innovations in devices have driven historical progress in computing, and explores ideas for further improvements in devices and computing. Students apply material to understand how building improved computing systems requires knowledge of devices, and how making the correct device requires knowledge of computing systems. Includes a design project for practical application of concepts, and labs for experience building silicon transistors and devices.
A. Akinwande
No textbook information available

6.2530 Introduction to Nanoelectronics
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 6.2532)
Prereq: 6.3000
Units: 4-0-8
______
Transistors at the nanoscale. Quantization, wavefunctions, and Schrodinger's equation. Introduction to electronic properties of molecules, carbon nanotubes, and crystals. Energy band formation and the origin of metals, insulators and semiconductors. Ballistic transport, Ohm's law, ballistic versus traditional MOSFETs, fundamental limits to computation.
M. A. Baldo

6.2532 Nanoelectronics
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 6.2530)
Prereq: 6.3000
Units: 4-0-8
______
Meets with undergraduate subject 6.2530, but requires the completion of additional/different homework assignments and or projects. See subject description under 6.2530.
M. A. Baldo

6.2540 Nanotechnology: From Atoms to Systems
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: Physics II (GIR)
Units: 2-3-7
______
Introduces the fundamentals of applied quantum mechanics, materials science, and fabrication skills needed to design, engineer, and build emerging nanodevices with diverse applications in energy, memory, display, communications, and sensing. Focuses on the application and outlines the full progression from the fundamentals to the implemented device and functional technology. Closely integrates lectures with design-oriented laboratory modules. 
F. Niroui

6.2600[J] Micro/Nano Processing Technology
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Same subject as 3.155[J])
Prereq: Calculus II (GIR), Chemistry (GIR), Physics II (GIR), or permission of instructor
Units: 3-4-5
Lecture: MW2.30-4 (66-144) Lab: TBA
______
Introduces the theory and technology of micro/nano fabrication. Includes lectures and laboratory sessions on processing techniques: wet and dry etching, chemical and physical deposition, lithography, thermal processes, packaging, and device and materials characterization. Homework uses process simulation tools to build intuition about higher order effects. Emphasizes interrelationships between material properties and processing, device structure, and the electrical, mechanical, optical, chemical or biological behavior of devices. Students fabricate solar cells, and a choice of MEMS cantilevers or microfluidic mixers. Students formulate their own device idea, either based on cantilevers or mixers, then implement and test their designs in the lab. Students engage in extensive written and oral communication exercises. Course provides background for research work related to micro/nano fabrication. Enrollment limited.
J. Del Alamo
No required or recommended textbooks

6.6500[J] Integrated Microelectronic Devices
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 3.43[J])
Prereq: 3.42 or 6.2500
Units: 4-0-8
______
Covers physics of microelectronic semiconductor devices for integrated circuit applications. Topics include semiconductor fundamentals, p-n junction, metal-oxide semiconductor structure, metal-semiconductor junction, MOS field-effect transistor, and bipolar junction transistor.  Emphasizes physical understanding of device operation through energy band diagrams and short-channel MOSFET device design and modern device scaling. Familiarity with MATLAB recommended.
J. Del Alamo

6.6510 Physics for Solid-State Applications
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 6.2300 and 6.6400
Units: 5-0-7
______
Classical and quantum models of electrons and lattice vibrations in solids, emphasizing physical models for elastic properties, electronic transport, and heat capacity. Crystal lattices, electronic energy band structures, phonon dispersion relations, effective mass theorem, semiclassical equations of motion, electron scattering and semiconductor optical properties. Band structure and transport properties of selected semiconductors. Connection of quantum theory of solids with quasi-Fermi levels and Boltzmann transport used in device modeling.
Staff

6.6520 Semiconductor Optoelectronics: Theory and Design
______

Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 6.2500 and 6.6400
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on the physics of the interaction of photons with semiconductor materials. Uses the band theory of solids to calculate the absorption and gain of semiconductor media; and uses rate equation formalism to develop the concepts of laser threshold, population inversion, and modulation response. Presents theory and design for photodetectors, solar cells, modulators, amplifiers, and lasers. Introduces noise models for semiconductor devices, and applications of optoelectronic devices to fiber optic communications.
Staff

6.6530 Physics of Solids
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: 6.6510 or 8.231
Units: 4-0-8
______
Continuation of 6.730 emphasizing applications-related physical issues in solids. Topics include: electronic structure and energy band diagrams of semiconductors, metals, and insulators; Fermi surfaces; dynamics of electrons under electric and magnetic fields; classical diffusive transport phenomena such as electrical and thermal conduction and thermoelectric phenomena; quantum transport in tunneling and ballistic devices; optical properties of metals, semiconductors, and insulators; impurities and excitons; photon-lattice interactions; Kramers-Kronig relations; optoelectronic devices based on interband and intersubband transitions; magnetic properties of solids; exchange energy and magnetic ordering; magneto-oscillatory phenomena; quantum Hall effect; superconducting phenomena and simple models.
Staff

6.6600[J] Nanostructure Fabrication
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Not offered academic year 2023-2024Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 2.391[J])
Prereq: 2.710, 6.2370, 6.2600, or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
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Describes current techniques used to analyze and fabricate nanometer-length-scale structures and devices. Emphasizes imaging and patterning of nanostructures, including fundamentals of optical, electron (scanning, transmission, and tunneling), and atomic-force microscopy; optical, electron, ion, and nanoimprint lithography, templated self-assembly, and resist technology. Surveys substrate characterization and preparation, facilities, and metrology requirements for nanolithography. Addresses nanodevice processing methods, such as liquid and plasma etching, lift-off, electroplating, and ion-implant. Discusses applications in nanoelectronics, nanomaterials, and nanophotonics.
Staff

6.6630[J] Control of Manufacturing Processes
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Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 2.830[J])
Prereq: 2.008, 6.2600, or 6.3700
Units: 3-0-9
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Statistical modeling and control in manufacturing processes. Use of experimental design and response surface modeling to understand manufacturing process physics. Defect and parametric yield modeling and optimization. Forms of process control, including statistical process control, run by run and adaptive control, and real-time feedback control. Application contexts include semiconductor manufacturing, conventional metal and polymer processing, and emerging micro-nano manufacturing processes.
D. Hardt


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Produced: 18-APR-2024 05:10 PM