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Course 17: Political Science
Fall 2024


International Relations/Security Studies


International Relations

17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences Communication Intensive HASS
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Reasons for America's past wars and interventions. Consequences of American policies. Evaluation of these consequences for the US and the world. History covered includes World Wars I and II, the Korean and Indochina wars, the Cuban Missile Crisis and current conflicts, including those in in Iraq and Afghanistan, and against al Qaeda.
Staff

17.407 Chinese Foreign Policy
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Credit cannot also be received for 17.408
______
Explores the leading theoretical and methodological approaches to studying China's interaction with the world since 1949. Readings include books and articles that integrate the study of China's foreign policy with the field of international relations. Requires basic understanding of Chinese politics or international relations theory. Meets with 17.408 when offered concurrently.
M. T. Fravel

17.408 Chinese Foreign Policy
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Credit cannot also be received for 17.407
______
Explores the leading theoretical and methodological approaches to studying China's interaction with the international system since 1949. Readings include books and articles that integrate the study of China's foreign policy with the field of international relations. Requires basic understanding of Chinese politics or international relations theory. Meets with 17.407 when offered concurrently.
M. T. Fravel

17.41 Introduction to International Relations
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences Communication Intensive HASS
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: MW10 (4-237) Recitation: TBA
______
Provides an introduction to the causes of international conflict and cooperation. Topics include war initiation, crisis bargaining, international terrorism, nuclear strategy, interstate economic relations, economic growth, international law, human rights, and environmental politics.
M. Grinberg
No required or recommended textbooks

17.410 Globalization, Migration, and International Relations
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 17.411)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Tracing the evolution of international interactions, subject examines the dimensions of globalization in terms of scale and scope. Includes international environmental issues, impacts and expansion of human activites, and the potential implications for global and national policy. Linkages among individuals, nation-states, transnational organizations and firms, international systems, and the global environment. Special focus on models of globalization, challenges of sustainable development, and on evolving types. Institutional responses to globalization and global change. 17.411 fulfills undergraduate public policy requirement in the major and minor. Students taking the graduate version are expected to explore the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.
N. Choucri

17.411 Globalization, Migration, and International Relations
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 17.410)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Tracing the evolution of international interactions, subject examines the dimensions of globalization in terms of scale and scope. Includes international environmental issues, impacts and expansion of human activites, and the potential implications for global and national policy. Linkages among individuals, nation-states, transnational organizations and firms, international systems, and the global environment. Special focus on models of globalization, challenges of sustainable development, and on evolving types. Institutional responses to globalization and global change. 17.411 fulfills undergraduate public policy requirement in the major and minor. Students taking the graduate version are expected to explore the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.
N. Choucri

17.416 Theoretical Models in International Relations and Comparative Politics
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Develops the skill of generating elegant, creative, satisfying theories of politics, with a focus on theoretical models in International Relations and Comparative Politics. Discusses views on theory from the philosophy of science and techniques for theorizing in several theoretical traditions. Students examine and critically analyze theoretical work in the field with an eye to learning what makes influential theories influential. Complements the IR and CP field seminars, Scope and Methods, and Game Theory.
R. Nielsen

17.418 Field Seminar in International Relations Theory
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: M11-1 (E53-485)
______
Provides an overview of the field of international relations. Each week a different approach to explaining international relations is examined. Surveys major concepts and theories in the field to assist in the preparation for further study in the department's other graduate offerings in international relations.
M. Grinberg
No required or recommended textbooks

17.42 Causes and Prevention of War
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences Communication Intensive HASS
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 4-0-8
______
Examines the causes of war, with a focus on practical measures to prevent and control war. Topics include causes and consequences of misperception by nations; military strategy and policy as cause of war; religion and war; US foreign policy as a cause of war and peace; and the likelihood and possible nature of great wars in the future. Historical cases include World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Seven Years' War, the Arab-Israel conflict, other recent Mideast wars, and the Peloponnesian War.
S. Van Evera

17.420 Advances in International Relations Theory
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Critical analysis of contending theories of international relations. Focus is on alternative theoretical assumptions, different analytical structures, and a common core of concepts and content. Comparative analysis of realism(s), liberalism(s), institutionalism(s), and new emergent theories. Discussion of connections between theories of international relations and major changes in international relations. Open to undergraduates by permission of instructor.
N. Choucri

17.424 International Political Economy of Advanced Industrial Societies
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses analytically on how interest groups, voters, political parties, electoral institutions, ideas and power politics interact to shape policy outcomes. Topics include globalization, international trade, international monetary and financial relations, and security.
Staff

17.426 Empirical Models in International Relations and Comparative Politics
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 17.802 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Explores statistical methods as applied to international relations and comparative politics. Discusses methodological issues unique to these subfields, primarily in the areas of measurement and causal inference. Students examine and critically analyze existing work in the field to gain familiarity with the array of models and methodological choices employed thus far in published research articles. Complements Quantitative Methods I and II by exploring how the methods developed in those subjects have been applied in the field.
R. Nielsen

17.428 American Foreign Policy: Theory and Method
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines the causes and consequences of American foreign policy since 1898. Readings cover theories of American foreign policy, historiography of American foreign policy, central historical episodes including the two World Wars and the Cold War, case study methodology, and historical investigative methods. Open to undergraduates by permission of instructor.
S. Van Evera

17.430 Research Seminar in International Relations
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
While this seminar provides an overview of recent literature, its principal purpose is to help graduate students develop skills suited to production of research papers and/or dissertations. Begins by reviewing general theoretical and methodological issues, then turns to specific empirical studies that examine the effects of systems structure, national attributes, bargaining processes, institutions, ideas, and norms on security affairs and political economy. The last two sessions of the seminar are devoted to evaluating research proposals generated by all members of the class.
K. Oye

17.432 Causes of War: Theory and Method
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides an in-depth survey of scholarly theories associated with war. Examines when, where, and why wars—both interstate and intrastate—occur, why some conflicts escalate, and how wars end. Drawing from scholarship in political science and other disciplines, students explore debates over the variables that cause war and the mechanisms through which conflicts unfold. Includes readings that offer both theoretical and empirical insights.
E. Lin-Greenberg

17.433 International Relations of East Asia
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 17.434)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces and analyzes the international relations of East Asia. Examines the sources of conflict and cooperation during and after the Cold War, assessing competing explanations for key events in East Asia's international relations. Readings drawn from international relations theory, political science and history. Students taking the graduate version are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.
M. T. Fravel

17.434 International Relations of East Asia
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 17.433)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces and analyzes the international relations of East Asia. Examines the sources of conflict and cooperation during and after the Cold War, assessing competing explanations for key events in East Asia's international relations. Readings drawn from international relations theory, political science and history. Students taking graduate version are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.
M. T. Fravel

17.445 International Relations Theory in the Cyber Age
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 17.446)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines cyber dynamics and processes in international relations from different theoretical perspectives. Considers alternative theoretical and empirical frameworks consistent with characteristic features of cyberspace and emergent transformations at all levels of international interaction. Theories examined include realism and neorealism, institutionalism and liberalism, constructivism, and systems theory and lateral pressure. Highlights relevant features and proposes customized international relations theory for the cyber age. Students taking the graduate version are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.
N. Choucri

17.446 International Relations Theory in the Cyber Age
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 17.445)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines cyber dynamics and processes in international relations from different theoretical perspectives. Considers alternative theoretical and empirical frameworks consistent with characteristic features of cyberspace and emergent transformations at all levels of international interaction. Theories examined include realism and neorealism, institutionalism and liberalism, constructivism, and systems theory and lateral pressure. Highlights relevant features and proposes customized international relations theory for the cyber age. Students taking the graduate version are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.
N. Choucri

17.447[J] Cybersecurity
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as IDS.050[J], MAS.460[J])
(Subject meets with 17.448[J], IDS.350[J], MAS.660[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on the complexity of cybersecurity in a changing world. Examines national and international aspects of overall cyber ecology. Explores sources and consequences of cyber threats and different types of damages. Considers impacts for and of various aspects of cybersecurity in diverse geostrategic, political, business and economic contexts. Addresses national and international policy responses as well as formal and informal strategies and mechanisms for responding to cyber insecurity and enhancing conditions of cybersecurity. Students taking graduate version expected to pursue subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.
N. Choucri, S. Madnick, A. Pentland

17.448[J] Cybersecurity
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as IDS.350[J], MAS.660[J])
(Subject meets with 17.447[J], IDS.050[J], MAS.460[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on the complexity of cybersecurity in a changing world. Examines national and international aspects of overall cyber ecology. Explores sources and consequences of cyber threats and different types of damages. Considers impacts for and of various aspects of cybersecurity in diverse geostrategic, political, business and economic contexts. Addresses national and international policy responses as well as formal and informal strategies and mechanisms for responding to cyber insecurity and enhancing conditions of cybersecurity. Students taking graduate version expected to pursue subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.
N. Choucri, S. Madnick, A. Pentland

17.449 Emerging Technology and International Security
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: TR9.30-11 (66-154)
______
Explores how emerging technologies — including drones, artificial intelligence, social media, additive manufacturing, and cyber warfare — affect international security. Examines how states develop these technologies, identifies barriers to innovation in the security domain, and considers how the proliferation of new military and dual-use technologies affect decisions on war and peace. Designed for students interested in international relations, security studies, and emerging technologies.
E. Lin-Greenberg
No textbook information available

17.452 Emerging Technologies and Intelligence: Deliverance, Delusion, or Both
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines the effect of emerging technologies on the organization and operation of intelligence agencies and how these technologies can and cannot address the steady-state challenges of interpretation, uncertainty, politicization, and surprise. Readings and case studies ground students in the work of leading intelligence scholars and, focusing on intelligence analysis, examine the effect of rational actor assumptions on intelligence failure. Designed for students interested in security studies, public policy, and emerging technologies.
Staff

17.456 The International Politics of Emerging Technology
(New)
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: T3-5 (E53-438)
______
Provides an in-depth survey of the international political and security implications of new technologies. Explores emerging technologies as both a dependent and independent variable. Readings and discussion assess the factors that contribute to military innovation and the proliferation of new technologies and analyze technology's effects on international politics.
E. Lin-Greenberg
No textbook information available


Security Studies

17.46 US National Security Policy
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides a comprehensive introduction to the making of US foreign and national security policy. Examines the laws that guide policy-making, studies the actors and organizations involved in the inter-agency process, and explores how interaction between the executive, legislative, and judicial branches shapes policy development and implementation. Students acquire practical experience through policy writing and a crisis simulation. Designed for students interested in international relations, security, and public policy.
E. Lin-Greenberg

17.468 Foundations of Security Studies
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: T1-3 (E53-438)
______
Develops a working knowledge of the theories and conceptual frameworks that form the intellectual basis of security studies as an academic discipline. Particular emphasis on balance of power theory, organization theory, civil-military relations, and the relationship between war and politics. The reading list includes Jervis, Schelling, Waltz, Blainey, von Clausewitz, and Huntington. Students write a seminar paper in which theoretical insights are systematically applied to a current security issue.
C. Talmadge
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

17.472 International Conflict in the Gray Zone Between War and Peace
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines US strategic, legal, and organizational readiness to deal with intensifying international conflict below the level of armed attack, including covert action, offensive cyber operations, propaganda, and economic coercion. Cases include Ukraine, Stuxnet, and South China Sea operations. Substantial reading ranges across Western, Leninist, and Chinese views of war, covert action history, international law, US strategy, industrial espionage, and the effects of technology on operations.
J. Brenner

17.473 Nuclear Strategy and Proliferation
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: MW3-4.30 (8-205)
______
Provides an introduction to the politics and theories surrounding the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Introduces the basics of nuclear weapons, nuclear strategy, and deterrence theory. Examines the historical record during the Cold War as well as the proliferation of nuclear weapons to regional powers and the resulting deterrence consequences.
V. Narang
No textbook information available

17.474[J] Nuclear Weapons and International Security
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 22.814[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 4-0-8
______
Examines the historical, political, and technical contexts for nuclear policy making, including the development of nuclear weapons by states, the evolution of nuclear strategy, the role nuclear weapons play in international politics, the risks posed by nuclear arsenals, and the policies and strategies in place to mitigate those risks. Equal emphasis is given to political and technical considerations affecting national choices. Considers the issues surrounding new non-proliferation strategies, nuclear security, and next steps for arms control.
Staff

17.478 Great Power Military Intervention
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions, and candidate military interventions, into civil wars since 1991. These civil wars did not easily fit into the traditional category of vital interest. These interventions may therefore tell us something about broad trends in international politics including the nature of unipolarity, the erosion of sovereignty, the security implications of globalization, and the nature of modern western military power.
B. Posen, R. Petersen

17.480 Understanding Modern Military Operations
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines selected past, current, and future sea, air, space, and land battlefields and looks at the interaction in each of these warfare areas between existing military doctrine and weapons, sensors, communications, and information processing technologies. Explores how technological development, whether innovative or stagnant, is influenced in each warfare area by military doctrine.
O. Cote

17.482 US Military Power
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with 17.483)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines the evolving roles and missions of US General Purpose Forces within the context of modern technological capabilities and Grand Strategy, which is a conceptual system of interconnected political and military means and ends. Topics include US Grand Strategies; the organization of the US military; the defense budget; and the capabilities and limitations of naval, air, and ground forces. Also examines the utility of these forces for power projection and the problems of escalation. Analyzes military history and simple models of warfare to explore how variations in technology and battlefield conditions can drastically alter effectiveness of conventional forces. 17.483 fulfills undergraduate public policy requirement in the major and minor. Students taking the graduate version are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.
B. Posen

17.483 US Military Power
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
(Subject meets with 17.482)
Prereq: Freshmen need permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines the evolving roles and missions of US General Purpose Forces within the context of modern technological capabilities and Grand Strategy, which is a conceptual system of interconnected political and military means and ends. Topics include US Grand Strategies; the organization of the US military; the defense budget; and the capabilities and limitations of naval, air, and ground forces. Also examines the utility of these forces for power projection and the problems of escalation. Analyzes military history and simple models of warfare to explore how variations in technology and battlefield conditions can drastically alter effectiveness of conventional forces. 17.483 fulfills undergraduate public policy requirement in the major and minor. Students taking the graduate version are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.
B. Posen

17.484 Comparative Grand Strategy and Military Doctrine
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
A comparative study of the grand strategies and military doctrines of the great powers in Europe (Britain, France, Germany, and Russia) from the late 19th to the mid-20th century. Examines strategic developments in the years preceding and during World Wars I and II. What factors have exerted the greatest influence on national strategies? How may the quality of a grand strategy be judged? Exploration of comparative case study methodology also plays a central role. What consequences seem to follow from grand strategies of different types? Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor.
B. Posen

17.486 Japan and East Asian Security
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: R9-11 (E53-438)
______
Explores Japan's role in world orders, past, present, and future. Focuses on Japanese conceptions of security; rearmament debates; the relationship of domestic politics to foreign policy; the impact of Japanese technological and economic transformation at home and abroad; alternative trade and security regimes; Japan's response to 9/11; and relations with Asian neighbors, Russia, and the alliance with the United States.
R. J. Samuels
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

17.488 Simulating Global Dynamics and War
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Explores the history, tools, and utility of crisis simulations and war games that model international dynamics. Aims to develop toolkits for future worlds exercises and for the production of conference papers and peer-reviewed publications. Students review historical debates about gaming and simulation methods while gaining experience designing and playing different kinds of exercises, including technical operational games, computerized rapid play games, nuclear crisis games, and global dynamics simulations.
R. Samuels, E. Heginbotham, E. Lin-Greenberg

17.490 Political Economy of International Security
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Introduces the scholarly literature on the political economy of international security, focusing on questions of how economic and security motivations are weighed against each other in both wartime and peace. Wartime topics include economic warfare, war financing, and technological investment. Peacetime topics include sanctions, market power, currency statecraft, and grand strategy.
M. Grinberg

Comparative Politics

17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences Communication Intensive HASS
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: MW2 (2-190) Recitation: TBA +final
______
Examines why democracy emerges and survives in some countries rather than in others; how political institutions affect economic development; and how American politics compares to that of other countries. Reviews economic, cultural, and institutional explanations for political outcomes. Includes case studies of politics in several countries. Assignments include several papers of varying lengths and extensive structured and unstructured class participation. Enrollment limited.
C. Lawson
No textbook information available

17.503 How Dictatorship Works
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: MW9.30-11 (66-154)
______
Investigates the different nature of threats that dictators, kings, and autocrats face from the population who want democratization and other powerful elites who want to replace them. Considers the different ways dictatorial leaders institutionally design their regimes to temper these competing threats. These include coup-proofing their internal security apparatus, repressing the population, controlling the media, and co-opting rivals.
M. Hassan
No textbook information available

17.506 Ethnic Politics
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: R3-5 (E53-485)
______
Introduces students to the classic works on ethnic politics, familiarizes them with new research and methodological innovations in the study of ethnic politics, and helps them design and execute original research projects related to ethnic politics. Readings drawn from across disciplines, including political science, anthropology, sociology, and economics. Students read across the four subfields within political science. Graduate students specializing in any subfield are encouraged to take this subject, regardless of their previous empirical or theoretical background.
E. Lieberman, V. Charnysh
No required or recommended textbooks

17.509 Social Movements in Comparative Perspective
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Explores why people join grassroots political organizations and social movements. Asks what accounts for the ultimate success or failure of these organizations and examines how social movements have altered political parties, political institutions, and social relations. Critically considers a range of theoretical treatments and several movements, including the US civil rights, poor peoples', pro-life/pro-choice and gay/lesbian movements.
M. Nobles

17.511 Critical Perspectives on Data and Identity
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines how group identities are recorded as "data" in various domains, and the effects of data collection on the formation of identities, inequality, redistribution and conflict around the world. Compares approaches to recording personal information on household censuses and surveys, college admissions forms, via automated, computer-based systems (AI), and other systems. Draws upon a wide variety of primary materials, and scholarly works from political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, and economics.
F. Christia, E. Lieberman

17.516 Transitional Justice
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Emerging democracies are now confronted with what has been termed "the torturer problem." The questions are old ones: What is to be done about the perpetrator(s) and what is to be done for the abused? Seminar broadly examines the theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding the issues commonly associated with "transitional justice," including its motivations, agents, institutions, and decisions. Cases are drawn from various countries and historical periods, including post-World War II Europe, 19th-century America, and 20th-century Africa and Latin America.
M. Nobles

17.523 Ethnic Conflict in World Politics
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Ethnic and racial conflict appear to be the hallmark of the post-Cold War world. Students explore the rise of ethnic/racial and nationalist sentiments and movements; the basis of ethnic and racial identity; the political claims and goals of such movements, and whether conflict is inevitable. Introduces the dominant theoretical approaches to race, ethnicity, and nationalism, and considers them in light of current events in Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas.
M. Nobles

17.524 State, Society, and Political Behavior in Developing Contexts
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines the political behavior of citizens in developing countries and the question of why governmental performance remains poor in these contexts, despite citizen efforts, international aid, and civil society initiatives. Evaluates and builds on our current understanding of political behavior and state-society relations when democratic institutions are weak, state capacity is low, and regimes are changing. Explores these questions by drawing on new and old literatures from institutional, sociological, psychological, and political economy perspectives.
L. Tsai

17.526 Comparative Urban Development
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines both classic and recent research on urban politics, including studies of resource distribution, clientelism and machine politics, ethnic politics, property rights, economic informality, and violence in cities spanning the developing world, and also draws comparisons to urban areas in developed democracies. Special attention is paid to the effects of urban context on political behavior. Readings are primarily from political science, but also include work from sociology, economics, and related disciplines.
N. Nathan

17.53 The Rise of Asia
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on social, economic, political, and national security problems of China and Japan -- two of the largest economies in a dynamic region with the potential to shape global affairs. Examines each topic and country from the perspectives of history, contemporary issues, and their relations with one another and the United States.
R. Samuels, T. Fravel

17.537 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 17.538)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Analyzes contemporary Japanese politics, focusing primarily upon the post-World War II period. Includes examination of the dominant approaches to Japanese politics and society, the structure of the party system, the role of political opposition, the policy process, foreign affairs, and interest groups. Attention to defense, foreign, industrial, social, energy, technology policy processes. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and class presentations. Assignments differ.
R. J. Samuels

17.538 Politics and Policy in Contemporary Japan
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 17.537)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Analyzes contemporary Japanese politics, focusing primarily upon the post-World War II period. Includes examination of the dominant approaches to Japanese politics and society, the structure of the party system, the role of political opposition, the policy process, foreign affairs, and interest groups. Attention to defense, foreign, industrial, social, energy, and technology policy processes. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and class presentations. Assignments differ.
R. J. Samuels

17.55[J] Introduction to Latin American Studies
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences Communication Intensive HASS
(Same subject as 21A.130[J], 21G.084[J], 21H.170[J])
(Subject meets with 21G.784)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: TR11-12.30 (66-154)
______
Examines contemporary Latin American culture, politics, and history. Surveys geography, economic development, and race, religion, and gender in Latin America. Special emphasis on the Salvadoran civil war, human rights and military rule in Argentina and Chile, and migration from Central America and Mexico to the United States. Students analyze films, literature, visual art, journalism, historical documents, and social scientific research.
T. Padilla
No textbook information available

17.561 European Politics
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: TR11-12.30 (66-148)
______
Examines similarities and differences in politics and political economy in Britain, Germany, and Sweden. Particular focus on the structure of political power within the state, and on important institutions that form the link between state and society, especially political parties and interest organizations.
K. Thelen
No required or recommended textbooks

17.565 Israel: History, Politics, Culture, and Identity
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Credit cannot also be received for 17.567
______
Examines Israeli identity using a broad array of materials, including popular music, film, documentaries and art, in addition to academic historical writings. Topics include Israel's political system and society, ethnic relations, settlement projects, and the Arab minorities in the Jewish state. Students also discuss whether there is a unique Israeli culture and the struggle for Israel's identity. Limited to 60; preference to students in the MISTI MIT-Israel program.
Staff

17.567 Israel: History, Politics, Culture, and Identity
______

Undergrad (IAP) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
Credit cannot also be received for 17.565
______
Examines Israeli identity using a broad array of materials, including popular music, film, documentaries and art, in addition to academic historical writings. Topics include Israel's political system and society, ethnic relations, settlement projects, and the Arab minorities in the Jewish state. Students also discuss whether there is a unique Israeli culture and the struggle for Israel's identity. Limited to students in the MISTI MIT-Israel program.
P. Krause

17.568 Comparative Politics and International Relations of the Middle East
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: M1-3 (E53-438)
______
Surveys both classic and cutting-edge work on the politics of the Middle East, broadly defined. Topics include the causes and consequences of political and economic development, authoritarianism and democratization, the influence of social movements, the role of women in Middle Eastern polities, regional inter-state relations, Islamism, terrorism, colonialism and foreign occupation, state-building, resistance and rebellion, and the Arab uprisings.
R. Nielsen, M. Hassan
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

17.569 Russia's Foreign Policy: Toward the Post-Soviet States and Beyond
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Analyzes Russia's foreign policy, with a focus on relations with the other post-Soviet states. Frames the discussion with examination of US-Russian and Sino-Russian relations. Looks at legacies of the Soviet collapse, strengths and vulnerabilities of Russia, and the ability of other states to maintain their sovereignty. Topics include the future of Central Asia, the Georgian war, energy politics, and reaction to the European Union's Eastern Partnership. Readings focus on international relations, historical sources, and contemporary Russian and Western sources.
C. Saivetz

17.57[J] Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society: 1917 to the Present
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences Communication Intensive HASS
(Same subject as 21G.086[J], 21H.245[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: TR1-2.30 (4-253)
______
Explores the political and historical evolution of the Soviet state and society from the 1917 Revolution to the present. Covers the creation of a revolutionary regime, causes and nature of the Stalin revolution, post-Stalinist efforts to achieve political and social reform, and causes of the Soviet collapse. Also examines current developments in Russia in light of Soviet history. Enrollment limited.
E. Wood
No textbook information available

17.571 Engineering Democratic Development in Africa
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines the varied relationship between democracy and human development in sub-Saharan Africa. Encourages students to apply engineering thinking to better understand which institutions, practices, and technologies have helped, and which have hindered, the achievement of health, education, infrastructure, and other outcomes. Addresses many of the challenges and dilemmas of democratic practice in poor, diverse, and unequal societies, while inviting students to propose practical interventions.
E. Lieberman

17.572 Political Economy of Africa
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Explores how African leaders have projected authority and built states, and, in turn, how their states' actions have influenced major economic and societal outcomes, including agrarian development, economic inequality and informality, violence, grassroots collective action, and the nature of ethnic and partisan political mobilization. Spans the pre-colonial period to the present day. Readings primarily drawn from political science, but also include work from economics, history, and related disciplines.
N. Nathan

17.577 Electoral Politics in the Developing World
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: TR3-4.30 (66-154)
______
Explores how electoral competition operates in new democracies across the developing world. Major topics include how voters hold politicians accountable for good governance, how politicians campaign and distribute state resources, and why some elections are free, fair, and peaceful while others are violent and skewed to benefit incumbents. The course materials draw on examples from Africa, Latin America, the post-Soviet countries, South Asia, and the historical United States. 
N. Nathan
No required or recommended textbooks

17.578 Elections and Political Representation in the Developing World
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on the theoretical and empirical study of elections, representation, and governance in non-industrialized democratic societies. Surveys the contemporary literature on topics such as party systems, clientelism, electorally-motivated violence, ethnic politics, and federalism.
D. Hidalgo

17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines different types of violent political conflict. Compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Examines incidents such as riots in the US during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, in addition to current international events.
R. Petersen

17.582 Civil War
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Surveys the social science literature on civil war. Studies the origins of civil war, discusses variables affecting duration, and examines termination of conflict. Highly interdisciplinary and covers a wide variety of cases. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of instructor.
F. Christia

17.584 Civil-Military Relations
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Subject consists of five sections. After a general survey of the field, students consider cases of stable civilian control, military rule, and transitions from military to civilian rule. Cases are selected from around the world.
R. Petersen

17.588 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Provides an introduction to the field of comparative politics. Readings include both classic and recent materials. Discusses research design and research methods, in addition to topics such as political culture, social cleavages, the state, and democratic institutions. Emphasis on each issue depends in part on the interests of the students.
C. Lawson

17.590 State Building
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Examines the process of building modern, national states across regions at different levels of development. Focuses on conceptualizing and measuring state power; and on the range of political, economic, and social explanations that account for variation, including the role of technology, war, material endowments, geography, trust, ethnic diversity, and democratic regimes. Evaluates the quality of evidence for different accounts. Theoretical orientation intended for Ph.D. students in political science.
E. Lieberman

17.591 Research Seminar in Applied International Studies
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on research methods in the social sciences as they relate to topics in international studies. Students complete an independent research project on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor; class presentation required. Limited to 18; preference to Applied International Studies minors.
B. Schneider

Models and Methods

17.800 Quantitative Research Methods I: Regression
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
Add to schedule Lecture: MW9.30-11 (E51-057) Recitation: TBA
______
Introduction to statistical research in political science and public policy, with a focus on linear regression. Teaches students how to apply multiple regression models as used in much of political science and public policy research. Also covers elements of probability and sampling theory. Limited to 30; preference to Course 17 PhD students.
D. Hildago
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

17.801 Political Science Scope and Methods
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: M11-1 (E51-390) Recitation: W11 (E51-393)
______
Introduces principles of empirical and theoretical analysis in political science through research projects currently conducted in the department. Different department faculty lead modules that introduce students to major research questions and different ways of examining those questions. Emphasizes how this research in progress relates to larger themes, and how researchers confront obstacles to inference in political science. Includes substantial instruction and practice in writing (with revision) and oral presentations. Intended primarily for majors and minors.
F. Christia
No required or recommended textbooks

17.802 Quantitative Research Methods II: Causal Inference
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 17.800, 17.803, or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
______
Survey of statistical methods for causal inference in political science and public policy research. Covers a variety of causal inference designs, including experiments, matching, regression, panel methods, difference-in-differences, synthetic control methods, instrumental variables, regression discontinuity designs, quantile regression, and bounds. Limited to 30; preference to Course 17 PhD students.
D. Hidalgo

17.803 Political Science Laboratory
______

Undergrad (Spring) Institute Lab
Prereq: 17.801 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-6-6
______
Introduces students to the conduct of political research using quantitative methodologies. The methods are examined in the context of specific political research activities like public opinion surveys, voting behavior, Congressional behavior, comparisons of political processes in different countries, and the evaluation of public policies. Includes instruction and practice in written and oral communication. Students participate in joint class projects and conduct individual projects. Does not count toward HASS Requirement. Enrollment limited; preference to Course 17 majors who have pre-registered.
E. Parker-Magyar, H. Zhang

17.804 Quantitative Research Methods III: Generalized Linear Models and Extensions
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: 17.802 or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
Add to schedule Lecture: MW9.30-11 (E51-390) Recitation: TBA
______
Provides a survey of statistical tools for model-based inference in political science and public policy. Topics include generalized linear models for various data types and their extensions, such as discrete choice models, survival outcome models, mixed effects and multilevel models. Covers both frequentist and Bayesian approaches. Limited to 15; preference to Course 17 PhD students.
I. S. Kim
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

17.806 Quantitative Research Methods IV: Advanced Topics
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: 17.804 or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
______
Covers advanced statistical tools that are useful for empirical research in political science and public policy. Possible topics include missing data, survey sampling and experimental designs for field research, machine learning, text mining, clustering, Bayesian methods, spatial statistics, and web scraping. Limited to 15; preference to Course 17 PhD students.
I. S. Kim

17.810 Game Theory and Political Theory
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 17.811)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
______
Introduces students to the rudiments of game theory within political science. Provides all students with the ability to solve simple games. Readings draw from basic texts on game theoretic modeling and applied articles in American Politics, International Relations, and Comparative Politics. Students taking the graduate version evaluate applied theory articles in the major journals.
Staff

17.811 Game Theory and Political Theory
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Subject meets with 17.810)
Prereq: None
Units: 4-0-8
______
Introduces students to the rudiments of game theory within political science. Provides students with the ability to solve simple games. Readings draw from basic texts on game theoretic modeling and applied articles in American politics, international relations, and comparative politics. Students taking the graduate version evaluate applied theory articles in the major journals.
Staff

17.830 Empirical Methods in Political Economy
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Reviews recent quantitative empirical studies on important, substantive questions in political economy. Designed to increase students' understanding of the core research designs and measurement strategies employed in the empirical analysis of political institutions and political behavior. Topics include the political and economic consequences of direct democracy, reservations for political minorities, corruption, political effects of the media, and politics in authoritarian regimes.
D. Hidalgo

17.831 Data and Politics
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Explores the intersection between politics and data. Introduces principles and practice of data-driven methods used to understand electoral and other types of political behavior. Students use real world datasets to explore topics such as election polling and prediction, the determinants of voter turnout, how campaigns target voters, and how public opinion changes over time.
D. Hidalgo

17.835 Machine Learning and Data Science in Politics
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Prereq: 6.100A or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
______
Introduces students to politics by analyzing political science data sets with machine learning methodologies. Covers a variety of data science tools, including supervised and unsupervised learning methods, visualization techniques, text analysis, and network analysis. Emphasizes how the research methodologies can be used for studying political science. Topics include lobbying, international trade, political networks, and estimating ideologies of political leaders.
I. S. Kim

17.850 Political Science Scope and Methods
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: F11-1 (E53-485)
______
Introduces principles of empirical and theoretical analysis in political science. Exposes students to major research questions and different ways of examining them. Limited to Course 17 PhD students.
D. Caughey
Textbooks (Fall 2024)

17.860 How to Theory
(New)
______

Not offered academic year 2024-2025Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Workshop-based subject providing an overview of how to construct a theoretical argument through a mix of conceptual examination and practical application. Examines different components and aspects of theory building, allowing students to refine their own proto-theories and develop their completed theoretical propositions. Complements subjects in research design as well as qualitative and quantitative methods. Project proposal required.
M. Grinberg

17.878 Qualitative Methods and Fieldwork
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Prepares students to conduct independent qualitative research, focusing on practical skills acquisition. Topics include methodological controversies, debates about transparency, human subjects protocols and research ethics, interviewing techniques, ethnography, focus groups, comparative historical case studies/archival research, and write-up of qualitative information collected from the field.
E. Lieberman

Common Ground Subjects

17.C08[J] Causal Inference
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Same subject as 15.C08[J])
Prereq: 6.3800, 6.3900, 6.C01, 14.32, 17.803, 18.05, 18.650, or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
______
Provides an accessible overview of modern quantitative methods for causal inference: testing whether an action causes an outcome to occur. Makes heavy use of applied, real-data examples using Python or R and drawn from the participating domains (economics, political science, business, public policy, etc.). Covers topics including potential outcomes, causal graphs, randomized controlled trials, observational studies, instrumental variable estimation, and a contrast with machine learning techniques. Seeks to provide an intuitive understanding of the core concepts and techniques to help students produce and consume evidence of causal claims.
J. Doyle, R. Rigobon, T. Yamamoto

General Subjects

17.UR Undergraduate Research
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Research opportunities in Political Science in theoretical and applied research. For further information, contact the Departmental Coordinator.
K. Hoss
No required or recommended textbooks

17.URG Undergraduate Research
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Research opportunities in political science in theoretical and applied research. For further information, contact the departmental coordinator.
K. Hoss
No required or recommended textbooks

17.90 Politics, Policy, and Political Science: What Does It All Mean?
(New)
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-1 [P/D/F]
Add to schedule Lecture: T3-5 (4-153)
______
Explores the scope of political science, policy, and politics through conversations with faculty who research across the field. Topics include misinformation and democracy, dictatorships, nuclear war and AI, and why governments make the policy decisions they do. Gives a broad overview of the role of methods and data in political science. This class counts towards the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first-year students.
A. Campbell
No required or recommended textbooks

17.902 Political Science Internship and Research
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
For students participating in off-campus internships relevant to the field of political science. Before registering, students must submit a 1-2 page application statement which describes the internship, the nature of the work, the time commitment (hours per week and number of weeks) and the connection to the field of political science. Students must also submit a formal offer letter from a host employer/organization which provides details of the internship. Subject to departmental approval. Consult departmental undergraduate office.
K. Hoss
No required or recommended textbooks

17.905-17.911 Reading Seminar in Social Science
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units arranged
______
Reading and discussion of special topics in the fields of social science. Open to advanced undergraduates by arrangement with individual staff members. 17.909 is taught P/D/F.
Staff

17.922 Martin Luther King, Jr. Design Seminar
______

Undergrad (IAP)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-3 [P/D/F]
______
Facilitates design and construction of installations and other community projects in conjunction with and beyond MIT's celebration of Dr. King. Students discuss the ideas and goals of Dr. King and other human rights leaders in the US and the world. The first half of the class develops in-depth understanding of the history of US racial issues as well as past and present domestic and international political struggles. Addresses issues of justice, equality and racism through videos, readings and writings, and class discussions. In the second half, students work as a group complete the installation and projects which serve as models for connecting academics with real life problems and struggle.
Staff

17.925 Fundamentals of Science and Technology Public Policy Making: Science and Technology Policy Boot Camp
______

Undergrad (IAP)
Prereq: None
Units: 2-0-1
______
Examines the public policy behind, and the government's role in, the science and technology-based innovation system. Focuses on the US, but also discusses international examples. Prepares students planning careers in and around science and technology with the basic background for involvement in science policy making. Limited to 35. Application required.
W. Bonvillian

17.959 Preparation for General Exams
______

Graduate (Fall, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Selected readings for Political Science doctoral students in preparation for qualifying exams.
S. Twarog
No textbook information available

17.954-17.958, 17.960 Reading Seminar in Social Science
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Add to schedule 17.954: TBA.
______
Reading and discussion of special topics in the fields of social science. Open to advanced graduate students by arrangement with individual staff members. 17.954 and 17.959 are taught P/D/F.
Staff
17.954: No textbook information available

17.962 Second Year Paper Workshop
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Workshop for research and writing of major research paper as part of pre-dissertation requirements. Restricted to doctoral students.
F. Christia

17.THG Graduate Political Science Thesis
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Program of research and writing of thesis; to be arranged by the student with supervising committee.
S. Twarog
Textbooks arranged individually

17.THT Thesis Research Design Seminar
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Prereq: 17.803 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Students writing a thesis in Political Science develop their research topics, review relevant research and scholarship, frame their research questions and arguments, choose an appropriate methodology for analysis, and draft the introductory and methodology sections of their theses.
K. Hoss
No required or recommended textbooks

17.THU Undergraduate Political Science Thesis
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Program of research leading to the writing of an SB thesis. To be arranged by the student under approved supervision.
K. Hoss
No required or recommended textbooks

17.S912 Special Undergraduate Subject in Political Science
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
______
Reading and discussion of topics in the field of social science not covered in the regular curriculum.
Staff

17.S914 Special Undergraduate Subject in Political Science
______

Undergrad (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units arranged
______
Reading and discussion of topics in the field of social science not covered in the regular curriculum.
Staff

17.S916 Special Undergraduate Subject in Political Science
______

Undergrad (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
______
Reading and discussion of topics in the field of social science not covered in the regular curriculum.
Staff

17.S917 Special Undergraduate Subject in Political Science
______

Undergrad (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
______
Reading and discussion of topics in the field of social science not covered in the regular curriculum.
C. Lawson

17.S918 Special Undergraduate Subject in Political Science
______

Undergrad (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
______
Reading and discussion of topics in the field of social science not covered in the regular curriculum.
L. Tsai

17.S919 Special Undergraduate Subject in Political Science
______

Undergrad (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units arranged
______
Reading and discussion of topics in the field of social science not covered in the regular curriculum.
Staff

17.S950 Special Graduate Subject in Political Science
______

Graduate (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Open to qualified graduate students who would like to pursue special studies or projects. Please consult graduate administration prior to registration.
Staff

17.S951 Special Graduate Subject in Political Science
______

Graduate (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Open to qualified graduate students who would like to pursue special subjects or projects. Please consult graduate administration prior to registration.
Staff

17.S952 Special Graduate Subject in Political Science
______

Graduate (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Open to qualified graduate students who would like to pursue special subjects or projects. Please consult graduate administration prior to registration.
Staff

17.S953 Special Graduate Subject in Political Science
______

Graduate (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Open to qualified graduate students who would like to pursue special subjects or projects. Please consult graduate administration prior to registration.
Staff


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