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Media Arts and Sciences
Fall 2024

MAS Home    Evaluations (Certificates Required)
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Undergraduate Subjects

MAS.131 Computational Camera and Photography
______

Undergrad (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers the complete pipeline of computational cameras that attempt to digitally capture the essence of visual information by exploiting the synergistic combination of task-specific optics, illumination, sensors, and processing. Students discuss and use thermal, multi-spectral, high-speed and 3-D range-sensing cameras, as well as camera arrays. Presents opportunities in scientific and medical imaging, and mobile phone-based photography. Also covers cameras for human computer interaction (HCI) and sensors that mimic animal eyes. Intended for students with interest in algorithmic and technical aspects of imaging and photography. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
R. Raskar

MAS.132 Mathematical Methods in Imaging
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-7
______
Surveys the landscape of imaging techniques and develops skills for conducting imaging research. Reviews technical and social aspects of the evolving camera culture and considers its role in transforming social interactions, reshaping businesses, and influencing communities worldwide. Explores innovative protocols for sharing and consumption of visual media, as well as novel hardware and software tools based on advanced lenses, digital illumination, modern sensors, and emerging image-analysis algorithms. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
R. Raskar

MAS.240 Black Mobility and Safety: From Birth to Walking in the US
______

Undergrad (Fall) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
______
One of two related subjects which explore physical, mental, socio-economic, political, and other issues related to mobility and safety for Black Americans through words, images, and sounds that reference social science and anti-racist research. Topics include birth, breathing, sleeping, eating, and walking while Black. Weekly meetings include private group discussions on assigned materials, public lectures from guests ranging from designers and urban planners to activists and social scientists, and private individual presentations for the group. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 10.
Staff

MAS.241 Black Mobility and Safety: From Loving to Learning in the US
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
______
One of two related subjects which explore physical, mental, socio-economic, political, and other issues related to mobility and safety for Black Americans through words, images, and sounds that reference social science and anti-racist research. Topics include learning, voting, driving, working, and loving while Black. Weekly meetings include private group discussions on assigned materials, public lectures from guests ranging from designers and urban planners to activists and social scientists, and private individual presentations for the group. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 10.
E. Ijeoma

MAS.342 Safeguarding the Future
______

Undergrad (Spring)
(Subject meets with MAS.842)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Leading experts guide discussions of how to safeguard the world against the greatest threats to our future. Topics range from the overt perils of pandemic and nuclear proliferation to the underlying coordination failures responsible for climate change, and from technological stagnation to transformative AI. Draws on the history of invention and science communication to explore which technologies are most likely to shape the future and how inventors and developers can influence outcomes, with the goal of determining how to accomplish as much good as possible. Emphasizes science writing and communication. Students write three op-eds on key issues and participate in a group project aiming to coordinate effective action. Students taking the graduate version complete additional work.
K. Esvelt, M. Specter

MAS.453[J] Mobile and Sensor Computing
______

Undergrad (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 6.1820[J])
Prereq: 6.1800 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on "Internet of Things" (IoT) systems and technologies, sensing, computing, and communication. Explores fundamental design and implementation issues in the engineering of mobile and sensor computing systems. Topics include battery-free sensors, seeing through wall, robotic sensors, vital sign sensors (breathing, heartbeats, emotions), sensing in cars and autonomous vehicles, subsea IoT, sensor security, positioning technologies (including GPS and indoor WiFi), inertial sensing (accelerometers, gyroscopes, inertial measurement units, dead-reckoning), embedded and distributed system architectures, sensing with radio signals, sensing with microphones and cameras, wireless sensor networks, embedded and distributed system architectures, mobile libraries and APIs to sensors, and application case studies. Includes readings from research literature, as well as laboratory assignments and a significant term project.
Staff

MAS.460[J] Cybersecurity
______

Undergrad (Spring) HASS Social Sciences
(Same subject as 17.447[J], IDS.050[J])
(Subject meets with 17.448[J], IDS.350[J], MAS.660[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on the complexity of cybersecurity in a changing world. Examines national and international aspects of overall cyber ecology. Explores sources and consequences of cyber threats and different types of damages. Considers impacts for and of various aspects of cybersecurity in diverse geostrategic, political, business and economic contexts. Addresses national and international policy responses as well as formal and informal strategies and mechanisms for responding to cyber insecurity and enhancing conditions of cybersecurity. Students taking graduate version expected to pursue subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.
N. Choucri, S. Madnick, A. Pentland

MAS.490 Independent Study in Media Arts and Sciences
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Special projects on group or individual basis. Registration subject to prior arrangement of subject matter and supervision by staff.
S. Shubart
No required or recommended textbooks

MAS.491 Independent Study in Media Arts and Sciences
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Special projects on group or individual basis. Registration subject to prior arrangement of subject matter and supervision by staff.
S. Shubart
No required or recommended textbooks

MAS.UR Undergraduate Research in Media Arts and Sciences
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Individual or group study, research, or laboratory investigations under faculty supervision, including individual participation in an ongoing research project. See UROP coordinator for further information
M. El-Kouedi
Textbooks arranged individually

MAS.URG Undergraduate Research in Media Arts and Sciences
______

Undergrad (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Individual or group study, research, or laboratory investigations under faculty supervision, including individual participation in an ongoing research project. See UROP coordinator for further information.
M. El-Kouedi
Textbooks arranged individually

Graduate Subjects

MAS.531 Computational Camera and Photography
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers the complete pipeline of computational cameras that attempt to digitally capture the essence of visual information by exploiting the synergistic combination of task-specific optics, illumination, sensors, and processing. Students discuss and use thermal, multi-spectral, high-speed and 3-D range-sensing cameras, as well as camera arrays. Presents opportunities in scientific and medical imaging, and mobile phone-based photography. Also covers cameras for human computer interaction (HCI) and sensors that mimic animal eyes. Intended for students with interest in algorithmic and technical aspects of imaging and photography. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
R. Raskar

MAS.532 Mathematical Methods in Imaging
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-7
______
Surveys the landscape of imaging techniques and develops skills for conducting imaging research. Reviews technical and social aspects of the evolving camera culture and considers its role in transforming social interactions, reshaping businesses, and influencing communities worldwide. Explores innovative protocols for sharing and consumption of visual media, as well as novel hardware and software tools based on advanced lenses, digital illumination, modern sensors, and emerging image-analysis algorithms. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
R. Raskar

MAS.552[J] City Science
______

Graduate (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 4.557[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on innovative propositions for shaping the cities of tomorrow, responding to emerging trends, technologies, and ecological imperatives. Students take part in "what-if?" scenarios to tackle real-world challenges. Through collaborative, project-based learning in small teams, students are mentored by researchers from the City Science group. Projects focus on the application of these ideas to case study cities and may include travel. Invited guests from academia and industry participate. Repeatable for credit with permission of instructor.
Staff

MAS.600 Human 2.0
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 0-9-0
______
Covers principles underlying current and future technologies for cognitive, emotional and physical augmentation. Focuses on using anatomical, biomechanical, neuromechanical, biochemical and neurological models of the human body to guide the designs of augmentation technology for persons with either unusual or normal physiologies that wish to extend their cognitive, emotion, social or physical capability to new levels. Topics include robotic exoskeletons and powered orthoses, external limb prostheses, neural implant technology, social-emotional prostheses, and cognitive prostheses. Requires student presentations, critiques of class readings, and a final project including a publication-quality paper. Enrollment limited.
Staff

MAS.630 Advanced Seminar: Affective Computing and Ethics
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-10
Add to schedule 9/6 meets in e14-633. Lecture: W10-12 (E15-341)
______
Instructs students on how to develop artificial intelligence technologies that help people measure and communicate emotion, that respectfully read and that intelligently respond to emotion, and that have internal mechanisms inspired by the useful roles emotions play in humans.  Students will also discuss ethical questions that arise with the use of emotion-AI technologies and how to prevent misuse.  Topics vary from year to year, and may include the interaction of emotion with cognition and perception; the communication of human emotion via face, voice, physiology, and behavior; construction of computers, agents, and robots having skills of emotional intelligence; the role of emotion in decision-making and learning; and ethical uses of affective technologies for education, autism, health, and market research applications. Weekly reading, discussion, and a term project required. Enrollment limited.
R. W. Picard
No textbook information available

MAS.660[J] Cybersecurity
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 17.448[J], IDS.350[J])
(Subject meets with 17.447[J], IDS.050[J], MAS.460[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Focuses on the complexity of cybersecurity in a changing world. Examines national and international aspects of overall cyber ecology. Explores sources and consequences of cyber threats and different types of damages. Considers impacts for and of various aspects of cybersecurity in diverse geostrategic, political, business and economic contexts. Addresses national and international policy responses as well as formal and informal strategies and mechanisms for responding to cyber insecurity and enhancing conditions of cybersecurity. Students taking graduate version expected to pursue subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.
N. Choucri, S. Madnick, A. Pentland

MAS.664[J] AI for Impact: Solving Societal-Scale Problems
______

Graduate (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
(Same subject as 15.376[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
______
Seminar promotes internal and external entrepreneurship, based on artificial intelligence (AI) technologies, to increase understanding of how digital innovations grow into societal change. Cases illustrate examples of both successful and failed businesses, as well as difficulties in deploying and diffusing products. Explores a range of business models and opportunities enabled by emerging AI innovations. Students craft a business analysis for one of the featured technology innovations. Past analyses have become the basis for research publications, and new ventures. Particular focus on AI and big data, mobile, and the use of personal data.
R. Raskar, P. Agrawal, S. Karaman

MAS.665[J] Global Ventures
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 15.375[J], EC.731[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: R10-12 (E14-633)
______
Seminar on founding, financing, and building entrepreneurial ventures in developing nations. Challenges students to craft enduring and economically viable solutions to the problems faced by these countries. Cases illustrate examples of both successful and failed businesses, and the difficulties in deploying and diffusing products and services through entrepreneurial action. Explores a range of established and emerging business models, as well as new business opportunities enabled by innovations emerging from MIT labs and beyond. Students develop a business plan executive summary suitable for submission in the MIT $100K Entrepreneurship Competition's Accelerate Contest or MIT IDEAS.
R. Raskar
No textbook information available

MAS.690 Independent Study in Media Arts and Sciences
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Opportunity for independent study under regular supervision by a faculty member. Registration subject to prior arrangement of subject matter and supervision by staff.
S. Shubart
No required or recommended textbooks

MAS.712 Learning Creative Learning
______

Graduate (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9 [P/D/F]
______
An introduction to the design of technologies, activities, and communities to support young people in creative learning experiences. Through readings, activities, and group discussions, explores the four P's of creative learning: projects, passion, peers, and play. Draws on examples from the Lifelong Kindergarten group at the MIT Media Lab, including the Scratch programming language and online community. Special focus on how to engage learners from many different backgrounds, with many different interests.
Staff

MAS.740 Black Mobility and Safety: From Birth to Walking in the US
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-6
______
One of two related subjects which explore physical, mental, socio-economic, political, and other issues related to mobility and safety for Black Americans through words, images, and sounds that reference social science and anti-racist research. Topics include birth, breathing, sleeping, eating, and walking while Black. Weekly meetings include private group discussions on assigned materials, public lectures from guests ranging from designers and urban planners to activists and social scientists, and private individual presentations for the group. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 10.
Staff

MAS.741 Black Mobility and Safety: From Loving to Learning in the US
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
______
One of two related subjects which explore physical, mental, socio-economic, political, and other issues related to mobility and safety for Black Americans through words, images, and sounds that reference social science and anti-racist research. Topics include learning, voting, driving, working, and loving while Black. Weekly meetings include private group discussions on assigned materials, public lectures from guests ranging from designers and urban planners to activists and social scientists, and private individual presentations for the group. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
E. Ijeoma

MAS.750 Human-Robot Interaction
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-7
______
In-depth exploration of the leading research, design principles, and technical challenges in human-robot interaction (HRI), with an emphasis on socially interactive robots. Topics include mixed-initiative interaction, multi-modal interfaces, face-to-face communication, human-robot teamwork, social learning, aspects of social cognition, and long-term interaction. Applications of these topics to the development of personal robots for health, education, elder care, domestic assistance, and other domains will be surveyed. Requires student presentations, critiques of class readings, student projects, and a final project including a publication quality paper.
C. Breazeal

MAS.771 Autism Theory and Technology
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-10
______
Illuminates current theories about autism together with challenges faced by people on the autism spectrum. Theories in communicating, interacting socially, managing cognitive and affective overload, and achieving independent lifestyles are covered. In parallel, the course presents state-of-the-art technologies being developed for helping improve both theoretical understanding and practical outcomes. Participants expected to meet and interact with people on the autism spectrum. Weekly reading, discussion, and a term project required. Enrollment limited.
Staff

MAS.772 AI for Mental Health
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units arranged
______
Provides instruction about behaviors and technologies that promote good mental health and foster resilience to stress and anxiety. Covers AI and smart technologies used in diagnosing, monitoring, and treating mental disorders. Students develop a project of their choosing on the topic, which may include novel technology design and evaluation, human subjects studies, machine learning and data analysis, or other investigations that propose and evaluate new ways to use AI for improving mental health. Enrollment limited; preference to MAS and other MIT students in their final year.
Staff

MAS.790 Independent Study in Media Arts and Sciences
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Opportunity for independent study under regular supervision by a faculty member. Registration subject to prior arrangement of subject matter and supervision by staff.
S. Shubart
No required or recommended textbooks

MAS.808 Decoders 2.0: Microfabricated Devices
______

Graduate (Fall) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
Add to schedule Lecture: W9-12 (E14-466)
______
Explores various microfabricated device layouts and their impacts on the world through guest lectures. Follows with literature review wherein students compose a summary paper based on representative papers published by the guest lecturers. As a final project, students write and publish on the class website a comprehensive perspective article based on guest lectures. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor. Limited to 10; preference to Media Arts and Sciences students.
C. Dagdeviren
No textbook information available

MAS.809 Decoders 1.9: Introduction to Microfabrication
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-6-3
______
Lectures along with cleanroom lab sessions (in Conformable Decoders' YellowBox) provide exposure to cleanroom processes and microfabrication techniques. Builds practical experience with all five components of the microfabrication techniques, including cleaning, deposition, patterning, etching, and testing. Working in small teams, students complete a midterm project in which they create a video of a microfabrication process demonstrated in the cleanroom. As a final project, students identify a problem that would be tackled with a collective device fabricated in the cleanroom in following semester. Students work throughout the term to develop a class booklet of microfabrication terms. Limited to 10 students, no listeners.
C. Dagdeviren

MAS.810 Decoders 1.8: Project Realization in Cleanroom
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: MAS.809 and permission of instructor
Units: 3-6-3
______
Builds on the combination of knowledge and skills learned in D1.0 and D1.7, respectively to guide students to develop their own mechanically adaptive (i.e., stretchable & flexible) piezoelectric systems. Students write an article about their research findings that will be published on the course website by the end of term. Instructs how to do literature review, to compose clear and concise sentences to describe findings, and to write a perspective article in a collective manner. Limited to 10; no listeners.
Staff

MAS.825[J] Musical Aesthetics and Media Technology
______

Graduate (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 21M.580[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-3-6
______
In-depth exploration of contemporary concepts in music and media. Studies recent music that uses advanced technology, and the artistic motivations and concerns implied by the new media. Practical experience with computer music technology, including MIDI and post-MIDI systems. Special emphasis on the interactive systems for professionals as well as amateurs. Midterm paper and term project required.
T. Machover

MAS.826[J] Projects in Media and Music
______

Graduate (Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 21M.581[J])
Prereq: MAS.825
Units: 3-3-6
______
Current computer music concepts and practice. Project-based work on research or production projects using the Media Lab's computer music, interactive, and media resources. Requires significant studio work and a term project. Projects based on class interests and skills, and may be individually or group-based. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.
T. Machover

MAS.834 Tangible Interfaces
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-3-6
Add to schedule Lecture: T1-4 (E15-341)
______
Explores design issues surrounding tangible user interfaces, a new form of human-computer interaction. Tangible user interfaces seek to realize seamless interfaces between humans, digital information, and the physical environment by giving physical form to digital information and computation, making bits directly manipulable with hands and perceptible at the periphery of human awareness. In the design studio environment, students explore experimental tangible interface designs, theories, applications, and underlying technologies, using concept sketches, posters, physical mockups, and working prototypes.
H. Ishii
No textbook information available

MAS.836 Sensor Technologies for Interactive Environments
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-3-6
______
A broad introduction to a host of sensor technologies, illustrated by applications drawn from human-computer interfaces and ubiquitous computing. After extensively reviewing electronics for sensor signal conditioning, the lectures cover the principles and operation of a variety of sensor architectures and modalities, including pressure, strain, displacement, proximity, thermal, electric and magnetic field, optical, acoustic, RF, inertial, and bioelectric. Simple sensor processing algorithms and wired and wireless network standards are also discussed. Students are required to complete written assignments, a set of laboratories, and a final project.
Staff

MAS.837 Principles of Electronic Music Interfaces
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Explores the ways in which electronic music is controlled and performed. A solid historical perspective is presented, tracing the development of various families of electronic musical controllers and instruments from their genesis in the late 1800s onwards. Design principles and engineering detail are also given for various current and classic controllers. Evolving issues in the control of computer music for live performance and interactive installations are discussed, including computer mapping of sensor signals and transduced gesture onto sound, music, and other media. Weekly reading assignments are given, and a final project or paper is required.
J. Paradiso

MAS.838[J] Prototyping our Sci-Fi Space Future: Designing & Deploying Projects for Zero Gravity Flights
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 16.88[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-2-8
Add to schedule Lecture: T1-3 (E15-359)
______
Instruction in project development, prototyping, and deployment readiness for parabolic flights. Admitted student teams are offered flyer and project-deployment slots on the Space Exploration Initiative's spring parabolic flight, upon successful completion of the course in the fall and integration with the flight provider. Covers three main topic areas: 1) rapid prototyping and engineering skills to prepare projects for operation in microgravity; 2) logistics, training, and safety pre-approval steps to meet flight readiness requirements and pass a Technical Readiness Review (TRR); and 3) creative and technical lenses for the future of space exploration, examining the MIT Space Exploration Initiative's design and prototyping approach, and MIT parabolic flight research examples across Science, Engineering, Art, and Design, and across departments. Enrollment limited; admission by application.
C. Paige, A. Ekblaw, J. Hoffman
No textbook information available

MAS.839[J] Operating in the Lunar Environment
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
(Same subject as 16.839[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-2-8
______
Explores in detail the design and engineering challenges posed by operating in the lunar environment. Students work in teams to design a payload to address strategic objectives associated with NASA's Artemis program, aiming to enable near-term sustainable settlements on the lunar surface. Lectures and associated recitations explore varying mission goals and operating environments, from lunar-class launch, to orbiters, landers, rovers, and habitats. Guest lecturers include prominent engineers, scientists, industry players, and policymakers with direct experience in lunar mission design and development. Enrollment limited; admission by application.
J. Hoffman, A. Ekblaw

MAS.841 Evolution: Natural and Directed
______

Graduate (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Covers topics in molecular evolution, including mutation, recombination, evolvability, sexual reproduction and substitutes, experimental and directed evolution, genomic conflict, and gene drive. Features discussion-based critical analyses of the primary literature. At the end of the term, students prepare short research proposals emphasizing research strategy, experimental design, presentation, and writing. They also write a short grant proposal or manuscript intended for publication.
Staff

MAS.842 Safeguarding the Future
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Subject meets with MAS.342)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
______
Leading experts guide discussions of how to safeguard the world against the greatest threats to our future. Topics range from the overt perils of pandemic and nuclear proliferation to the underlying coordination failures responsible for climate change, and from technological stagnation to transformative AI. Draws on the history of invention and science communication to explore which technologies are most likely to shape the future and how inventors and developers can influence outcomes, with the goal of determining how to accomplish as much good as possible. Emphasizes science writing and communication. Students write three op-eds on key issues and participate in a group project aiming to coordinate effective action. Students taking the graduate version complete additional work.
K. Esvelt, M. Specter

MAS.858[J] Asking How Space Enabled Designs Advance Justice and Development
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 16.857[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule Lecture: M9-12 (E14-493)
______
Examines theoretical and practical challenges of applying complex technology, such as space systems, to advance justice and development within human society. Proposes and critiques a concept of justice and development based on attainment of the US Sustainable Development Goals. Analyzes text by historians and economists around global patterns of uneven technology access. Teaches systems engineering tools to analyze the context, stakeholders, functions and forms of complex systems that impact society. Presents six space technologies used for specific Sustainable Development Goal. Students read several text, discuss key themes, write reflective responses, and write a research proposal on a topic of their choice. Part of two-class series on space technology and sustainable development. Limited to 15.
D. Wood
No textbook information available

MAS.859[J] Space Technology for the Development Leader
______

Graduate (Spring)
(Same subject as 16.859[J])
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-3
______
Follow on to MAS.858. Introduces intersections between space technology and sustainable development by examining technical, policy and social aspects of seven space technologies: satellite earth observation; satellite communication; satellite positioning; human space flight and micro gravity research; space technology transfer; fundamental scientific space research; and small satellites. Lectures introduce the UN Sustainable Development Goals and show linkages to seven space technologies from the perspective of development practitioners. Students read scholarly papers, write weekly responses, give presentations, and write a research paper.
D. Wood

MAS.862 The Physics of Information Technology
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Self-contained introduction to the governing equations for devices that collect, store, manipulate, transmit and present information. Provides an understanding of how operational device principles work, their uses, the limits on their performance, and how they might be improved. Students review the foundations of thermodynamics and noise, electromagnetics, and the quantum description of materials, and then study their application in areas such as semiconductor logic, magnetic storage, wireless and optical communications, and quantum information and computation.
N. Gershenfeld

MAS.863[J] How to Make (Almost) Anything
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 4.140[J], 6.9020[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-9-6
URL: https://fab.cba.mit.edu/classes/MAS.863/
Add to schedule Lecture: W1-4 (E14-633) Recitation: R EVE (5-7 PM) (E14-633) +final
______
Provides a practical hands-on introduction to digital fabrication, including CAD/CAM/CAE, NC machining, 3-D printing and scanning, molding and casting, composites, laser and waterjet cutting, PCB design and fabrication; sensors and actuators; mixed-signal instrumentation, embedded processing, and wired and wireless communications. Develops an understanding of these capabilities through projects using them individually and jointly to create functional systems.
N. Gershenfeld
No textbook information available

MAS.864 The Nature of Mathematical Modeling
______

Not offered academic year 2025-2026Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Surveys the range of levels of description for mathematical modeling, including analytical solutions and approximations for difference and differential equations; finite difference, finite element, and discrete element numerical models; stochastic processes, nonlinear function fitting, constrained optimization, and machine learning architectures. Emphasis is on how these methods relate, and on their efficient practical implementation.
N. Gershenfeld

MAS.865 Rapid-Prototyping of Rapid-Prototyping Machines: How to Make Something that Makes (Almost) Anything
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: MAS.863 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-9-0
______
Studies rapid-prototyping machines and covers the theory and practice of digital fabrication processes. Weekly lectures supported by readings from research literature. Students work on machine development projects throughout the term.
N. Gershenfeld

MAS.881[J] Principles of Neuroengineering
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 9.422[J], 20.452[J])
(Subject meets with 20.352)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Covers how to innovate technologies for brain analysis and engineering, for accelerating the basic understanding of the brain, and leading to new therapeutic insight and inventions. Focuses on using physical, chemical and biological principles to understand technology design criteria governing ability to observe and alter brain structure and function. Topics include optogenetics, noninvasive brain imaging and stimulation, nanotechnologies, stem cells and tissue engineering, and advanced molecular and structural imaging technologies. Includes design projects. Designed for students with engineering maturity who are ready for design. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
E. S. Boyden, III

MAS.883[J] Revolutionary Ventures: How to Invent and Deploy Transformative Technologies
______

Graduate (Fall)
(Same subject as 9.455[J], 15.128[J], 20.454[J])
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 2-0-7
Add to schedule Lecture: R2-4 (E14-633)
______
Seminar on envisioning and building ideas and organizations to accelerate engineering revolutions. Focuses on emerging technology domains, such as neurotechnology, imaging, cryotechnology, gerontechnology, and bio-and-nano fabrication. Draws on historical examples as well as live case studies of existing or emerging organizations, including labs, institutes, startups, and companies. Goals range from accelerating basic science to developing transformative products or therapeutics. Each class is devoted to a specific area, often with invited speakers, exploring issues from the deeply technical through the strategic. Individually or in small groups, students prototype new ventures aimed at inventing and deploying revolutionary technologies.
E. Boyden, J. Bonsen, J. Jacobson
No textbook information available

MAS.885 How To Grow (Almost) Anything
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
______
Teaches skills at the cutting edge of bioengineering and synthetic biology. Taught in three major modules: synthetic biology bootcamp, biofabrication and imaging, and genome engineering. Guest lecturers provide expertise in their respective domains and wet lab skills development. Topics include bio design, next generation synthesis, bio production, protein design, synthetic minimal cells, engineering the gut microbiome, 3D bio printing & biofabrication, expansion microscopy, and DNA nanostructures. Students should have experience or background in at least one of the following areas: synthetic biology, molecular, cell, or micro-biology, digital fabrication, design, or art. Limited to 15.
J. Jacobson, D. Kong

MAS.890 Independent Study in Media Arts and Sciences
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Opportunity for independent study under regular supervision by a faculty member. Registration subject to prior arrangement of subject matter and supervision by staff.
S. Shubart
No required or recommended textbooks

General

MAS.910 Research in Media Technology
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Research for Media Arts and Sciences students, where the assigned research is approved for academic credit by the department.
S. Shubart
No required or recommended textbooks

MAS.912 Teaching in Media Arts and Sciences
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Laboratory, tutorial, or classroom teaching under the supervision of a Media Arts and Sciences faculty member. Students selected by interview. Enrollment limited by availability of suitable teaching assignments.
S. Shubart
No required or recommended textbooks

MAS.914 Practical Experience in Media Arts and Sciences
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 0-1-0 [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
For Media Arts and Sciences masters students participating in curriculum-related off-campus professional internship experiences. Before enrolling, students must have an employment offer from a company or organization and approval from their advisor. Subject to departmental approval. Upon completion of the activity the student must submit a write-up of the experience, approved by the MIT advisor. Consult the MAS Office for details on procedures and restrictions.
S. Shubart
No required or recommended textbooks

MAS.915 Practical Experience in Media Arts and Sciences
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 0-1-0 [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
For Media Arts and Sciences doctoral students participating in curriculum-related off-campus professional internship experiences. Before enrolling, students must have an employment offer from a company or organization and approval from their advisor. Subject to departmental approval. Upon completion of the activity the student must submit a write-up of the experience, approved by the MIT advisor. Consult the MAS Office for details on procedures and restrictions.
S. Shubart
No required or recommended textbooks

MAS.921 Proseminar in Media Arts and Sciences
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9 [P/D/F]
Add to schedule Lecture: R1-3 (E15-341)
______
Designed specifically for new doctoral students in the Media Arts and Sciences (MAS) program. Explores intellectual foundations of MAS, unifying themes connecting MAS research, and working practices of MAS researchers. Restricted to MAS doctoral students.
J. Paradiso
No textbook information available

MAS.940 Preparation for SM Thesis I
______

Graduate (Spring)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 1-0-2 [P/D/F]
______
For first-year master's students in the MAS program. Features faculty-led discussions on best practices for conducting and evaluating research in diverse disciplines, ways of assessing the consequences of new technologies, and strategies for mitigating unintended outcomes. Working in small groups, students share and critique research ideas to catalyze and refine projects and collaborations. By the end of the course, students will have identified potential committee members to help guide their thesis research.
K. Esvelt, C. Breazeal

MAS.941 Preparation for SM Thesis II
______

Graduate (Fall)
Prereq: MAS.940 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6 [P/D/F]
Add to schedule Lecture: W4-5.30 (E15-341)
______
Guides students in the selection of thesis topic, definition of method of approach, and preparation for Crit Day and thesis proposal.
K. Esvelt
No textbook information available

MAS.945 Media Arts and Sciences General Exam
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 0-12-0 [P/D/F]
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Required subject for Media Arts and Sciences doctoral students working on the general exam, from preparation of the proposal through completion of the oral and written components of the exam.
S. Shubart
No required or recommended textbooks

MAS.950 Preparation for Ph.D. Thesis
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Selects thesis subject, defines method of approach, and prepares preliminary thesis outline. Independent study, supplemented by frequent individual conferences with staff members. Restricted to doctoral candidates.
S. Shubart
No required or recommended textbooks

MAS.S10 Special Subject in Media Technology
______

Undergrad (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
URL: https://mit-cml.github.io/gen-ai-fall-2023.github.io/
______
Supplementary work in areas not covered by the regular curriculum. Registration subject to prior arrangement.
Fall: H. Abelson, R. Davis, C. Breazeal
Spring: MAS Staff

MAS.S60-MAS.S64 Special Subject in Media Technology
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Add to schedule MAS.S60: Lecture: T1-3 (34-302)
Add to schedule MAS.S61: Lecture: R1-3 (E15-466)
Add to schedule MAS.S62: Lecture: M2-5 (E14-493)
Add to schedule MAS.S63: Lecture: M EVE (4-6 PM) (E15-359)
Add to schedule MAS.S64: Lecture: F2-4 (E15-359)
______
Supplementary work in areas not covered by the regular curriculum. Registration subject to prior arrangement.
Z. Lieberman
MAS.S60: No textbook information available
MAS.S61: No textbook information available
MAS.S62: No textbook information available
MAS.S63: No textbook information available
MAS.S64: No textbook information available

MAS.S65-MAS.S69 Special Subject in Media Technology
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Add to schedule MAS.S65: TBA.
Add to schedule MAS.S66: Lecture: W2-5 (E15-359)
Add to schedule MAS.S67: TBA.
Add to schedule MAS.S68: TBA.
______
Supplementary work in areas not covered by the regular curriculum. Registration subject to prior arrangement.
Staff
MAS.S65: No textbook information available
MAS.S66: No textbook information available
MAS.S67: No textbook information available
MAS.S68: No textbook information available

MAS.S70 Special Subject in Media Technology
______

Graduate (IAP) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged [P/D/F]
______
Supplementary work in areas not covered by the regular curriculum. Registration subject to prior arrangement.
Staff

MAS.S71 Special Subject in Media Technology
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit; first half of term
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Supplementary work in areas not covered by the regular curriculum. Registration subject to prior arrangement.
Staff

MAS.S72 Special Subject in Media Technology
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit; second half of term
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Supplementary work in areas not covered by the regular curriculum. Registration subject to prior arrangement.
Staff

MAS.S73 Special Subject in Media Technology
______

Graduate (IAP) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: None
Units arranged [P/D/F]
______
Supplementary work in areas not covered by the regular curriculum. Registration subject to prior arrangement.
Staff

MAS.S74 Special Subject in Media Technology
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit; first half of term
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: None
Units arranged
______
Supplementary work in areas not covered by the regular curriculum. Registration subject to prior arrangement.
Staff

MAS.S75 Special Subject in Media Technology
______

Graduate (Fall, Spring) Can be repeated for credit; second half of term
Not offered regularly; consult department
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Supplementary work in areas not covered by the regular curriculum. Registration subject to prior arrangement.
Staff

MAS.S76 Special Subject in Media Arts and Sciences
______

Graduate (IAP) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
______
Supplementary work in areas not covered by the regular curriculum. Registration subject to prior arrangement.
Staff

MAS.S90 Special Subject in Media Arts and Sciences
______

Graduate (Fall) Can be repeated for credit; partial term
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Add to schedule Lecture: R3-5 (E15-341)
______
Supplementary work in areas not covered by the regular curriculum. Registration subject to prior arrangement.
J. Paradiso
No textbook information available

MAS.THG Graduate Thesis
______

Graduate (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Can be repeated for credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units arranged
Add to schedule TBA.
______
Program of research and writing of thesis; to be arranged by the student with supervising committee.
S. Shubart
No required or recommended textbooks


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